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December 21, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BUR THE .MICHIGAN DAILY

..--

LL MI1NISTER STARTS,
FUND FRINJURED A
"Big Bill" MacKinnon, Who Lost Both
Arms in Accident, Will Receive
Christmas Present
Through the efforts of Rev. Lloyd
C. Douglas, a considerable sum has
been raised to help "Big Bill' Mac-
Kinnon, who lost his arms in a corn
husker near Ypsilanti several days
ago.
The fund is in charge of the Times-
News, and yesterday two checks ar-
rived in the morning's mail to help
swell Bill's Christmas fund, James H.
Marks and Prof. Robert E. Bunker of
the Law school, being the contributors
of $10.00 each.
Fate was certainly unkind to Bill
for had he lost only one arm, it might
have been a comparatively easy mat-
ter to find a job, but with both arms
off at the elbow, his chances for
wor k are growing slimmer.
Rev. Douglas saw Bill yesterday at
the Homeopathic hospital, and he
states that his patience and courage
are most remarkable, and told him
that he was preaching a wonderful
sermon from his bed. Bill laughed
heartily and said, "Well, I don't see
hov it would help to complain. I'm
here; and they're off and people are
being very kind to me. I guess I
might as well make the best of it."
MAIE ADDITION TO LISTS O1
PAPERS AT MEMORIAL <IIALL
Following is a list of newspapers
and periodicals which have recently
been added to those taken for the
reading room ifi Alumni Memorial
hall: Louisville Courier-Journal, Lon-
don Illustrated News, Life, Scientific
American, Indianapolis News, St.
Louis Globe-Democrat, Cleveland Plain
Dealer, Kansas City Star, Minneapolis
Journal, Omaha Bee, Grand Rapids
Herald.
Prof. W. If. Hobbs to Attend Conclave
Prof. William H. Hobbs will visit
Washington, D. C., during the vaca-
tion for the purpose of reading a pa-
per before the second Pan-Scientific
Congress to be held there. While in
the city he will attend the meeting of
the Geological Society of America at
Washington, and also a conclave of
the Association of American Profes-
sors.

Prof. J. S. Reeves Criticizes Lack i-,
eign
of Interest in Current Events1 books

ranging from the numerous for-
newspapers to propagandist
and pamphlets.

That Average College Ilan Neglects Affairs of Interest 1o
plaint of Eminent Political Scientist; Says The
is Inadequate as News Source
-----0----

Nation is Com-.
Pahly

Portland. Ore., Dec. 20.--The Ore-
gen Agricultural college football team
which this year dereated the Michi-
gan Aggies and lost to Syracuse on
Syracuse's recent far-western trip, isl
to come east to play Syracuse in the
1916 season.

Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 20-.-Rowing
is the oldest major sport at Harvard
university. In 144 an eight-oared
boat was purchased by the senior
class. In 1852 the first raCe was won
from Yale. From this victory the
sport received great impetus, and.
has since become more and more
prominent.
2255 2253 2255 2255

DE AN COOLEY APPOINTED TO
ATTEN I SCIENTIFiC UONGRIESS
Dean M. Cooley has been appointed
as an additional representative of the
university at the meting of the Pan-
American Scientific congress in Wash-
ington, D. C., from Dec. 27 to Jan. 8.
We set glass. C. H. Major & Co.
Phone 237. edtdec2l

That the average undergraduate col-
lege .student does not read enough
good newspaper articles, and is con-
sequently to a large extent uninform-
ed concerning current events, is the
opinion of Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, of
the political science department. It
is due to this fact that university stu-
dents today show such a lack of in-s
formation about happenings, of both
great and little importance, that are
occurring.
Professor Reeves cited the case of
an examination similar to the one
which Mr. Phillip Bursley, of the ro-
mance lauguage department, gave to
his French classes to test their
knowledge of current events. In this
examination, in reply to the question,
"Who is von Bethmann-Hollweg?" Mr.
Bursley received the various answers;
that the German Chancellor is head
of the German army, ambassador to
America, German ministei of finance,
Iron Chancellor of Germany and lead-
er of the Reichstag. He found that
Saloniki is in Russia, Turkey and
Asia Minor at the same time. Again,
England is ruled by the Georges III
and VIII, Henry V, Edward III and
finally William the Conqueror.

Such a lack of knowledge as this,
Professor Reeves says, is due direct-,
ly to the failure of the college man, in
the rush and hurry of undergraduate i
life, to read good news .from good
newspapers. In regard to what are
good newspapers to read, Professor
Reeves expressed himself to the ef-
fect that the best news comes from
New York. Hie said that New York,
after all, is the real metropolis of the
country and its best newspapers pub-
lish more national and international
information tha i alny other papers in
this country.
Speaking of The Daily, Professor
Reeves said that the telegraph news
which the college organ is now pub-
lishing is a good thing only if it whets
the student's appetite for more for-
eign information. -e is of the opin-
ion that in many cases the reader of
this news is satisfied that he knows
enough about current events when he
has finished glancing through the
columns of The Daily. [ut, in his
opinion, this is not so. To get enough
good current news one should read
newspapers of worth and value, and
this is what the average college ran
today does not do.

Ask Ag1h
I v
00

MALL

jg''

1iTli1

"gp it, t .on

COLLECTED COLLEGE NEWS

tr 9 a o 0poll.
Afternoon and Evening
also NEW YEAR'S Afternoon and Evening
Fifteein Cents EA i7sn
No Skating Christmas Eve After 7:00 O'Cl

Philadelphia, Dec. 20.-Members of
the sophomore class of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania have been as
sessed $300 to pay for damage done
to dormitories preceding the Poster
tight.
Lincoln, Neb., Dec. 20.-Contracts to
the amount of $350,000 were let at a
meeting of the Board of Regents of the
University of Nebraska for a new
chemistry building and a hospital at
Omaha.
Bloomington, Ind., Dec. 20.-"Jum-
bo" Stiehm, who has for the last five
years developed remarkable football
and basketball teams at the Univer-
sity of Nebraska, is to be director of
intercollegiate sports at the Univer-

sity of Indiana next year.
Princeton, N. J., Dec."
ton defeated Cornell in t
basketball game of the I
ate League season by as
to 17 Friday night.

0.-Prince-
he opening
ntercollegi-
score of 19

Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 20.-The spe-
cial collection of available data on the
European war which the Harvard Li-
brary has been making, now con-
tains more than a thousand books
and documents besides the foreign
newspapers that the library has been
filing, and the collection being made
in Germany for Harvard. The collec-
tion consists of the official publica-
tions of the various belligerents, ac-?
counts of the war written from a non-
partisan standpoint, and a large
amount of distinctly prejudiced liter-

1w

8

'

HOT LUNCHES SERVED AT

ALL TIMES

.__.___o._--

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THE

CHIGAN

AILY

Extends to its Friends

Best Wishes

.for

A MERY VCHRISTMAS

AND

A PROSPEROUS NEW. YEAR

A

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., _ . .
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