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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 19, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ii

fit'

I N

1

1W GYMmASUM

New Building Will Include Swimming
Pool, 5,400 Lockers and 55
Shower Baths
Plans for the enlarging of Water-]
mnan gymnasium have been completed
by Mr. James H. Marks, superintend-;
ent of buildings and grounds. The
condition of the annual budget forced
the regents to lay it aside for the
present, but as soon as the financial
rclnition of the university warrants,
the plans will be approved and work
will be begun upon the additions to
the building.
The new portion of the structure
' will be built of red brick with stone
trimmings and a slate roof. It will
be made as nearly fire-proof as pos-
silie, and the general appearance of
the building will be greatly improved.
The new main entrance will be on
the south side, directly across from
the medical building. There will be
a Broad flight of steps 'leading up to
the first floor, with a convenient en-
> trance to the locker rooms and swim-
ming pool immediately below.
According to the new plans, there
wil1 be 5,000 lockers and at least 55
shwer baths. The swimming pool will
be 75 feet long by 30 wide. It will be
xocated at the west end, while there
will be four handball courts at the
east end of the basement floor.
In addition to the offices of the di-
rector and physical trainer, the Ath-
letic association will have its head-
quarters in the building.
BOOK JOTK READING
FOR BETTER RELATIONS WITH
OUR LATIN-AMERICAN NEIGH-
.BORS.-By Robert Bacon. --Pub-
lished by the Carnegie Endowment
for International Peace.
One part of the work carried on by
the Carnegie Endowment for Inter-
national Peace is that of improving the
enmmercial relations of the United
States and the South American coun-
tri es. From time to time experts and
representative men from the United
States are sent to visit the countries
below the isthmus and work in the in-
terest of better mutual understanding.
This is the report of the latest trip
made for that purpose. The Honor-
able Robert Bacon, formerly Secretary
of State and Ambassador to France, is
th" author of this report, and the re-
sults of his visit, made in the summer
and fall of 1913, have been highly
beneficial. Since the. official visit of
Secretary Root in 1906 nothing has
been done that can boast of equal re-
sults in the way of cementing political
and commercial friendship between
the two continents.
Besides Mr. Bacon's interesting and
detailed account of the trip the vol-
,nie contains an explanatory inter-
view reprinted from the New York
Evening Post, an editorial from the
American Journal of International
Law, and seven appendices in which
are translations of the speeches made
by the visitors and their hosts as well
as of monographs published and dis-
tributed in Latin America.-L. S. T.
GOVERNMENT FINANCE IN THE
UNITED STATES. - By Professor
Plehn.
This book, written by a professor
in the University of California, is one
of the National Social Science series.
The first part is devoted to the de-
velopment of the idea that the expen-
ditures of the United States govern-
ment are gradually outrunning gov-
ernmental income; and that since the
sphere of governmental activities is
constantly on the increase, the ques-
tion of the raising of the money to

beep pace with governmental expendi-
ture is one of the utmost importance.
Dr. Pleuh suggests a state income
tax and a restricted use of the budget
system as a possible means of raising
the money. In view of the fact that
the author ws formerly opposed to
the incon tax in all its forms, it is
interesting to note the reasons that

Next Monday evening's grand opera
premiere at the Garrick theatre in
Detroit is rich in promise, and if the
reputation which has preceded the
San Carlos Grand Opera company be
sustained, the week will be rich in
results.
The opera event is without doubt
one of the most important musical
events of the season and judging from
the list of artists who will perform,
the tastes of all music lovers should
be satisfied. Some of the artists who
are to perform are as follows: Mmne.
Edvige Vaccari, Mary Kaestner, Man-
uel Salaer, Guiseppe Agostini, Angelo.
Antola, Alesandro Modesti and Mlle.
Margerita Pezzatini.
Among the operas to be produced
during the week are: "Aida," "Rigo-9
letto," "Pagliacci," and "Il Trovatore."
"September Morn," the musical
comedy which recently enjoyed such
marked success in Chicago, will play
at the Majestic theatre for three days,
commencing tomorrow night. The
play is one full of humor and quick
wit.
The music is of the catchy, snappy
kind that is sure to please. Among
the song hits are, "Everybody's Tango
Crazy," "In Berlin," and "The Sun
Shade Girl." The cast, which in-
cludes many cute chorus girls with
attractive voices, is exceptionally well-
balanced. Over 25 members of the
company take part in the play.
No more strange and thrilling story
was ever written than "The Family
Strain," adapted from "The Widow
Lerouge," which is shown at the Ma-
jestic theatre today. The plot of the
play deals with the murder of a
strange woman, the Widow Lerouge,
who is found dead one morning in her
home, from which certain papers have
been stolen.
A decidedly intricate detective story
is the outcome of this. It involves
many complications at first unfore-
seen and the final unravelling leads
to many surprising occurrences. The
play is produced so as to be intensely
interesting and the audience is con-
tinually held in suspense awaiting
the outcome of some exciting inci-
dent.

r*Lx.ms'rxC FEATvUIZEssCORPORATION 4
lWICIA &a BNDNLL.

Mr. and rs. Vernon Cast

Whom Everybody Knows
will be at

DEwrAYTi. MIC-D.

Nov. 29, 1915.

S. A. Mogn,
Arcade Amusement Co.,
An Arbor, M ichigan.
:Dear Sir:
Your letter at nand and would state that
our price for the six-reel picture, Mr. and Mrs.
Vernon Castle in "THE WHIRL OF LIFER is $75.00 a
day.
We want to state that we have an offer
from Ann Arbor for this picture, but I.have been
instructed to write you first regarding same.
This picture played to nearly 50,000
people at theMajestic Theatre, Detroit, and is a
knockout.
We have some open time in fecember and
request the favor of a prompt reply for the reasons
above stated.
Thanking you for your inquiry, we are
Yours very truly,
MAESTIC FEATURs CORP.
Rs"/O

Monday, December 20th
The"The WhSIX PARTS
An Interesting Play, Introducing All The Latest Popular Dances
S PE C IAL M U S IC
Also CHAPLIN in "SHANGHIED"
TWO PARTS
ADMISSION, 20 CENTS
Why Twenty Cents ? A great many people have the
idea that films cost the exhibitor about $5.00 a day. The let-
ter hereon explains the 20c. The features are really worth 25c to 50c

159 JEFFERSON AVENUE
'SCOND rIIA)O"
TrZL&pIRo-, MAIN. 28'

U I

FRONT VIEW OF WATERMAN GYMNASIUM AS IT WILL APPEAR AFTER REMODELLING

7 -f _ _' l ; t* -,
t/_ Sa '

--

I CITY NEWS

-I1

E

Slippery Sidewalks Cause Accident
Mrs. I. W. Byres, a State Grange
delegate from Iron Mountain, was the
victim of the perilous sidewalks when
she fell near the Allenel Hotel Fri-
day afternoon, breaking her leg just
below the knee.,
She was carried into the hotel
where she and her husband were
making their headquarters, and a
physician was called. He succeeded
in setting the broken member so that
they were able to proceed home that
evening.
Vagrants Flood City Jail
Chief of Police Frank Pardon was
busy yesterday afternoon rounding up]
vagrants who have been accumulat-
ing in the city during the past week.
He was especially busy in the vi-
cinity of the ice house, and succeeded
in picking up eight knights of the
road. When they were brought to the
police station, after leaving several
cans of steaming mulligan behind, it
developed that they we.re all, to the
man, on their way home to spend the
holidays. The chief not wishing to
break up the Christmas pilgrimage,
decided to allow them three hours to
get out of the city, or the alternative
of putting up at the city jail for 10
days.
New York Waiters to (ao On Strike
New York, Dec. 18.-Almost all of
the union workers employed south of
Fourteenth street have been ordered
to go out on strike tomorrow accord-
ing to an official of Local No. 1, of the
Hotel and Restaurant Employees In-
ternational Alliance and Bartenders'
International League of America.

GOOD TIME FOR ILLINOIS MEN
Entertainnment and Eats to Feature
Trip Rome in Special Car
Entertainment and eats will fea-
ture the good times that will be had
by Illinois men when they go home
in their special car on the Michigan
Central at 1:17 o'clock Tuesday. Roy
D. Lamond, '17, chairman of the en-
tertainment committee, has arranged
for mandolin, guitar and ukelele mu-
sic, and a number of vocal selections
will be rendered on the trip. An at-
tempt is being made to get a piano
inside the car. Humorous songs are
being arranged to liven the dead mo-
nents.
Doughnuts, smokes and cider will
be furnished in plenty and every ef-
fort is being made to rid the trip of
weariness. The committee appointed
to have charge of the refreshments is
as follows: E. K. Marshall, '17E,
chairman; H. C. Otis, '18, Norman
Ibsen, '18E, L. W. Page, '19E.
SENDS LETTER TO PRES. WILSON
OPPOSING MILITARY TRAINING
President A. W. Harris, of North-
western university, has recently sent
a letter to President Wilson in which
he opposes military training in col-
lege.
President Harris frankly stated that
military training in the college was
of no practical value unless the gov-
ernment made provision to use the
men. No preference was given to
college men in the Spanish-American
war, and they had to enlist as priv-
ates although there was a great need
for trained men.
According to President Harris, to
be effective, military training should
include a study of strategy, sanitation,
artillery and automobiles. It should

Student Operated on for Appendicitis
R. A. Yerington,'14E, was operated
on for appendicitis at the University
hospital yesterday morning. For a
while after the operation his condi-
tion was regarded as critical, but
early this morning he was reported to
be out of danger.
Clover Leaf Rns St. Louis Special
A Christmas train to St. Louis will
be run by the Clover Leaf. Reserva-
tions must be in by Monday morning.
For information call James C. Hayes,
telephone 799-M, or Moss W. Amis,
The Inn Keeper. A new booklet
by Mr. Lloyd C. Douglas, acceptable
holiday gift, published and for sale by
the James Foster House of Art. Price
15 cents. edtdec21

NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY HAS
$1,000,000 FOR BUILDINGS
Lincoln, Neb., Dec. 18.-A million
dollars for buildings under construc-
tion or authorized show that the Uni-
versity of Nebraska is making stren-
uous efforts to become "a greater uni-
versity." Over a mile of blueprints
for the new chemistry buildings at
Omaha indicates the scope of the work.
Go to C. H. Major & Co, for wall-
paper, paints, oils, varnishes, etc.
Phone 237. edtdec21
In future all cars stop at Goodyear's
Drug Store.'tt
Always see The Ann Arbor Press
for your printing if you want quality.
Press Bldg., aynard street. Plone
No.1 (*)yad teePhn

To Pick Rhodes Scholar December 30
'The Rhodes scholar from the state
of Michigan will be chosen by the
Board of Selection on December 30.
The board consists of five members:
President Harry B. Hutchins, Dean J.
R. Effinger, the chief justice of the
state supreme court, and the presi-
dents of Alma and Hope colleges.
Adelphli Picks Debating Candidates
At the preliminaries held in the
Adelphi House of Representatives last
night the following men were chosen
as Adelphi candidates for the Mid-
West debating teams: J. R. Simpson,
'18; I. Toplon, '17; 0. J. Watts, '18;
M. Daley, '16; F. Magruder, '18; Y.
R. Altsheler, '17; W. E. Olds, '16.
For papering, tinting or decorating
of any kind, go to C. H. Major & Co.,
203 E. Washington St. edtdec2l

GiftsatalPie
FOR HIM FOR HER
Stick Pins Ivory Goods
Cuff Buttons Leather Goods
RIManicure reSets
Signet Rings
Toilet Sets
Cigarette Cases Jewel Boxes
Tie Clasps Hand Bags
Watches Leather Novelties
CuGlassg
Watch Fobs and
Chains Brass & Copper Novelties
Bracelets
S1moker's SetsBar Pins
Tobacco Jars Pendants
Leather Goods Necklaces
HALLER JEWELRY COMPANY
STATE STREET JEWELERS

he assigns for this change of atti- About 8,000 waiters will answer the not be a military drill but a practical
tude. The chief one seems to be that call. training.
it has succeeded in Wisconsin, ands
that, as a tax, it is not at all diffi-' Arrest Clerk in Allies' Stronghold Ambassador's Appointment Confirmed
cult to administer.I I New York, Dec. 18.-The ramitica- J Washington, Dec. 18.-The Senate
Coming at a time wvhen the question tions of the German secret service led this afternoon confirmed the nomina-
of an adequate revenue for the vast today directly to the National City tion of Henry P. Fletcher to be the
increase proposed in the army and Bank. the banking institution in which new American ambassador to Mexico.
navy is assuming great proportions, is deposited the greater part of the
and in view of the increased atten- funds of the allies, set apart for the J-Hop Committee Holds Last Meeting.)
tion which is being paid to the inconm purchase of munitions of war. Fred- The J-Hob committee will hold its
tax. this book is extremely intleretilg. erick Schleindle, a clerk in the For-! last meeting before the Christmas holi-
ign department of the National i'ty days at 8::00 o'clock this afternoon at
Pood Printing-The Ann Arbor Press. Bank, was arrested. the Union.

1

FT CARDS FURNISHEDn F GIFT CARDS FURNISHED
rOFFLET'S Newsstand egezine ubscriplions R In s5GillsIIO EAST WASHINGTON

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