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December 18, 1915 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-18

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1DAILY

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VOL. X V N.-

PRICE FIVE CE]

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DEOEMBER 17, 1915.

ABYSSI'NIA' iENOS '
OFFER OF HELP TO
ENTENTEARMIES
EMP~ER4O Li iJENASSU QFFERN
ALLIES 2(0,4itit SOLDIERS
1F)t ANY IELl)
AUSTRIAN MARINE PLANS FAIL
Gernian 1atrol 'B at W %recked; Ru -
sii;t Occupy Persian City
of Ilnadan
London, Dec. 17._-Emperor Lidje-
nassu, of Abyssinia. :as offered the
allies 200,OG Abysinian soldiers for
any field where they may need them,
(quipped and ready for action.
This army can reach the Suez
Canal witcin four days, while it will
take five (ays to transport it to Meso-
potamia. Announcement of the Abys-
sinian ruler's offer was made today_
in the Frech chamber of (leputies by
Tierre Alyte, a member of the co-
lonial committee of. the chamber.
This is the first direct sign that the
entente power.s have officially taken
cognizance of the reported Turko-
German trip to the Suez Canal and
Egypt and the threat to carry the war
to the Orient. Furthermore it comes
upon the receipt of a proposal made
in the French Chamber yesterday
that the allies enlist Abyssinia in mil-
itary aid under guarantee of its in-
dependence.
Speculation concerning the role Ja-
pan will iday in the war in the Far
East, if it is carried through, is
again revived by the Abyssinian
offer. The suggestion was made in
Paris and here today that the Japa-
nese 'fleet may bring the Abyssinian
army to the front when they are
needed.
Trawlers Active In Adriatic
Rome, Dec. 17.-(Delayed.)-Be-
lated and incomplete reports of the
efforts of Austria-n submarines to pre-
vent the central transportation of the
Italian troops of Albania across the
Adriatic are now available.
The efforts were frustrated by the
precautions adopted by the allied
navy, including constant mine sweep-
ing operations carried on day and
night and constant patrolling by
trawlers or sea planes, thus securing
not only the safety of the convoy
troops but also the non-convoy trans-
portation of food stuffs to Montene-
gro and Albania.
The naval activities iof the allies
are being continued in the Adriatic
where it is. feared operations are ex-
pected.
1id Bodies of Officers

Engineers Plan COEYCLBT
iFavfStudentPRESENT PLAY AT
lIHITNEY TONI6HT

Expose Plo To.
Bowh ShipCanal
Other A ffaii's

MAMMOTH "RLNA TION REVUE" IN
INTERESTS OF C0SMOPOLITANISMll
WILL DIEMONSTIRATE POWERFUL sities in the production of like spec-
POSITION HELD IUNDER- talesi m future years.

S+'iiot' n,iler took first steps
tcwrad the holding of the third hi-
enM at gne ring exhibit when they
elected a general chairman o the ex-
hibi at their meeting last Thursday.
Plans are already under way which,
wh; wred out, promise to give a
big er, more elaborate exhibit than
ever before.
"W\e regard the engineering ex-
hibit valuable as affording students,'
faculty and visitrs an opportunity to
become acquainted with the engineer
by seeing many practical and inter-
esting applications of engineering,"
declared Dean Mortimer E. Cooley
when interviewed on the subject of
the exhibit yesterday. "It is inter-
esting and valuable to the students
themselves to organize and bring to
pass a rather large affair. The ex-
hibit is purely and wholly a student
affair. The faculty will act merely
as advisors. The heads of the pvari-
ous departments have been formed
into an advisory committee for this
purpose. This committee will act
only in the capacity of an advisor in
certain matters that may come up.
"The exhibit will be under the di-
rection this year, as usual, of the
senior and junior classes, although
sophomores ad freshmen will be
given ,an opportunity to help. We
plan to give an exhibit every two
years in order that each class of
juniors and seniors be given an op-
portunity to plan and make the ex-
hibit. The success of the exhibit de-
pends entirely on the students them-
selves and I think that we are going
to have a very successful one next
spring."
John F. Clark, general chairman
elected by the senior class, has al-
ready appointed some of his sub-
committees who will handle the work
in each department. The exhibits of
the departments, of civil, mechanical,
electrical, chemical and marine engi-
neering will be under the direction of
these sub-committees. The standing
committee, at its meeting Thursday
night, took favorable action on this
plan and assured the exhibit officers
of its interest and cooperation.
It is planned to give the exhibit on
Thursday and Friday of May Festival
week next spring. This arrangement
will afford a larger number of visit-
ors an opportunity to be present at
both affairs.
Chairman Clark has called a meet-
ing of the men he has appointed, for
5:00 o'clbck Monday evening. At this
time plans will be discussed and di-
rections given to the various commit-
tees. Sub-committees will be an-
nounced later when they have been
completely appointed.
PRESIDENT'S MRRIGE,
MAY E EVENING FF
bib sof (Ceemony Are Kept Secret;
Hone'ymIoon May 110
-Yarred
Washington, Dec. 17.-The under-
standing in Washington tonight was
that the wedding of President Wilson
to Mrs. Norman Galt tomorrow will
be an evening affair. The details of
the plans were guarded as closely on
the eve of the event as they were
weeks ago, but there seems to be very
little doubt among the President's
closest friends that the ceremony will
be performed in the home of Mrs.
Galt some time after 6:00 o'clock.
The President and his bride will
leave soon after the ceremony on
their honeymoon trip. Where that
will be is a secret that also has been
guarded closely, but there are indi-
cations that the happy period will be

passed in the South and that the
(Continued on Page Six)

19111 1 lLl I UIIIUII II

Now York, Dec. 1.

A 1)]6:. to blow

SENSAI'IO,1N OF'
ll" At i

PROVE

M}JRRISON WOOD IN STAR ROLE
P'y 1.P P{) ah, Helen Ely. huimphreys
Mriigst un. Leoii C iunighami
aid Others Coiprise Cast
Final dress rehearsal of the' Com-
edy club's play, "The Professor's
Love Story" was held at the Whitney
theatre last night, and the smooth-
ness of the evening's work augured
well for the success of the prbduc-
tion which will be staged tonight.
Everything went suspiciously well
until the scene where the professor
carries the heroine off the stage in a
supposedly dead faint. There the
stage director found fault with the
scene as played and the numerous re-
rehearsals of the incident furnished
amusement for the cast and small
audience, as well as more or less
hard work for the leading maa. This
was true to the old stage tradition
that a dress rehearsal that goes off
without a hitch, is a bad omen for1
the opening night and vice versa.
The audience tonight will be de-
lighted with the leading lady, Phyllis
Povah, '16, who takes the role of
Lucy White, the absent-minded pro-
fessor's secretary, with whom he fin-
ally finds himself in love. She will
have a hard race for honors with
Morrison Wood, '17, who plays the
leading part, and who is one of the
most finished actors the- campus has
produced in years.
The burring Scotch brogue of the
two Scotchmen, both of whom are
striving for the love of a bonnie las-l
sie of the same nationality, will fur-
nish part of the comedy in the play,
as will the dowager in her efforts
to marry the persecuted professor
against his will.
The excellent condition in which
the cast found itself the night before
the openingcan be credited almost
entirely to the untiring efforts of Ed-
ward Sachs, stage director of thel
club. He has spent several years on
the professional stage and is pre-
eminently qualified for the position.-
The prices for the production asl
announced last night, will range from
$1.50 to 25 cents. The play will start
at 8:00 o'clock. r

111) tile Wellancd e:nal, which rues
around the Niagara Falls on the Ca-
nadian side, is charged in connection
with the arrest of two promninen.tGer-
mans early tonight.
Thle arrests are to be a prelude to
a series o1' startling exposures of
German propaganda in this country
whici may link together a number of
events that have occurred in this
country..
The first man arrested was Paul
Koenig, head of the bureau of inves-
tigations of the Hamburg-American
line, and believed to be the head of
the German secret service in this
country. Koenig is well-to-do and
has been conspicuous in German cir-
cles.w He has taken out his first pa-
pers in connection with the plan to
become an American citizen.
The second man is Richard Emil
Levendecker, retailer of art goods at
347 Fifth avenue, and lives at 640
Morris avenue. le is a naturalized
American citizen. This arrest makes
the first instance where so-called
hyphenated Americans have beoi ar-
rested in connection with the German
propaganda.
These men will be charged under
sectioi 13 of the Foreign Criminal
Statutes, with planning a military en-
terprise against a country friendly
with the United States. The penalty
on conviction is three years' impris-
onment and $3,000 fine, or both.
"MENAECUMI" CAST SELECTED
Latin P ay to Be (Iv4n arch 30 by
Entire M~ale Cast
Selection of the cast of the Latin
play, "The Menaechmi," which is to
be presented in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall March 30, by the Classical club,
has been completed. There will be
an entire male cast, as it is the desire
of the club to keep as near as pos-
sible to the original presentation.
The cast chosen is as follows:
Menaechmus I, Henry G. Hoch, '19;
Menaechmu If, R. Clarence Hunter,
'17; Peniculus, George D. Wilner, '17;
Erotium, Lewis P. Waldo,'A'18; Cylin-
drus, MI. S. Tolochko, '19; lvessenio,
Ralph M. Carson, '17; Alatroma, John
1. Parker, '16; Senex, George Rob-
bertts, '16; Medicus, W. Gilman Dav-
idson, '19 Ancilla, Charles F. Wil-
ner, '19.
"The Menaechmi" will be presented
at the time the Classical Conference
convenes in Ann Arbor.

MARCH 1, DATE SET
Dr. Angell, lres. hutchins and Prom.
iient Faculty Men Sponsors
of Movement
TO REPRESENT ALL IATIONS
Stupendous Presentatitm il uts iI
Staged in Hill Aidiforiam

Men on Advisory Board
Success to this enterprise is fore-
shadowed by the list of men who have
accepted positions upon the advisory
board. The list includes the follow-
ing: President-Emeritus James B.
Angell, honorary president; President
Harry B. Hutchins, acting president;
Professor R. M. Wenley, Dean A. H.
Lloyd, Regent J. E. Beal, George Mil-
le., W. B. Shaw and Professor J. A.
(. Hildner, secretary.
Ever-y distinct nationality will find
he representation of its most 'salient
cha eteristics upon the stage of Hill
ainOl orium, according to the plans
nw under ' execution. A student

I I

Sweeping aside the restrictions of m fro u each nation will have charge of
tionality, the foreign students (' thet to r i
University of Michigan have combined ct which s to portray his coun-
to produce on March 7 one of tie iiiost mryThat such a condition is possible
t~o rodue onMarc oneo' :ystis niot a well known fact to university
stupendous spectacles in the history
of this institution with the der na-
on of furthering tihe cats.s Whenever it can be-done, the char-
politanoism and thg at ers will be chosen from the men
mopolites, "Abovf the particular country actually, en-
Sroied in the university, but in order
"The All-Nation hat the revue may lack nothing from
been called,isnot u a Ia o tme spectator's standpoint,. eminent
imro r-:sionals along desired lines will
conce~rtedl product'io _r1

,,

the powerful position held i-
ate circles by foreign unde r ates.
It is planned to mtake the movement
national in scope and t in perptr iate
the idea by intere ting' other univer-
MENSER IS WNE
IN PlgEACCONTEST
Carries Off First Honors With Speech
Entitled, "In the Name of
Humanity"I

I GORlE

). CASTO

IS SECOND

C. L. Menser, grad., won the honor
of representing the University of
Michigan in the state peace contest
when he carried off the local contest
held last evening in Hill auditorium.
G. D. Casto, grad., received second
honors.
Taking for his subject, 'In the
Name of Humanity," Menser made a
plea for America to accept the key-
note of the present age, service, and
lay down her national life, if need
be, for the ideal of internationalism
and world peace "in the name of hu-
nanity." The directness and earnest
appeal of the speaker won the ver-
dict for him. Menser was graduated
last spring from Heidelburg univer-
sity and is wokring for his master's
degree.
Casto's appeal was for the "En-
forcement of Peace." Public opinion
was shown to be the basis of a last-
ing peace since all law and govern-
ment are dependent upon it. A plan
(Continued on Page Six)
I WHAT'S GOINGON O

be engaged if the campus does not af-
ford mei of sufficient caliber.
Paviowa May Appear
,~he. Pavlowa, the notea Russian
Usnsr, has been, communicated with
an thle management is in hopes that
she will appear. In case, however,
this is found to be impossible, the
presence of other noted dancers has
been assured.
At least 150 people will take part in
the production, which is to be under
the direct supervision of Professor J.
R. Brumm, who, in collaboration with
Dr. H. S. Mallory, will write the ne-
cessary scenarios.
Musical and dancing numbers will
compose the greater part of the spec-
tacle, since it is through these chan-
nels that' the distinction between na-
tionalities is most easily drawn. Na-
tive songs played on. native instru-
ments, many of them wierd-sounding
and of peculiar shape, are to be made
use of, while the dancing numbers
vary from the wild dances of the Hun-
garian to the stately waltz in vogue
among the South Africans.
The directing board in full is: Pro-
fessor J. R. Brumm, executive direc-
tor; Dr. Breitenbach, advisory coun-
sel; Theodore Harrison, musical di-
rector; Dr. H. S. Mallory, scenario di-
rector; E. -R. Sylvester, '17, general
chairman.
The Staff Organization
The Staff organization is: William
] H. Fort, '16, general manager; Ed-
ward E. Mack, '17, promotion man-
ager; Kirk White, '17, advertising
manager; H. C. L. Jackson, '18, .pub-
licity manager; Frank I. Olmstead, '16,
club manager; J. Schmidt, '18D, stage
manager.
Rehearsals are alreaoy under way.
There have been three held so far and
every precaution is being used to make
each act catch the spirit of the na-
tion which it is to represent. In order
! that the success of the South African
number may be more forcefully-mark-
ed, music for the dances has been or-
(Continued on Page Six)
* * * * * * * * * * * *

London, Dec. 17.-The German pa-
trol boat Bunz has been wrecked on
the island of Langeland, in the Baltice
Sea. according to a Copenhagen dis-
patch to the Exchange Telegraph Co.
The bodes( of several German offi-
cers were found on the shore, the

.

dispatchi adds.
Ifanad au, Ven4er of Trade Route.
Petrograd, Dec. 17.--Russian troops
have occupied the Persian city of
Hanadan which lies 465 miles south-
west of Teheran, and is the center of
a trade route from Bagdad to Tadriz-'
istakan and Teheran.
TERRiFIC l)AMhAGE CAE!)D BY
TQRNADO IN SO{UTERN STATE
Meridian,tMiss., Dec. 17.-A tornado
that swept through Lauderdale and
Kemper counties destroyed the town
of Cullum today, killed at least 16
persons and injured 50. It is believed,
the death list will be doubled when
wire communication is restored and
complete reports are received. In
Meridian three persons were killed
and many injured. Five houses were
blown down at Dritoff, and 12 per-
sons were injured.

Scene from "The Professor's Love Story," at the Whitney Theatre, Tonight
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION STS.
SUNDAY, 10:30 A. M.
ADDRESS BY

TODAY
Comedy club play, Whitney theatre,
8:00 o'clock.
Chess club, 401 U-Hall, 6:15 o'clock.
Band meets for picture and election.
Rentschler's, 1:00 o'clock.
Tomorrow
Bishop Williams speaks, St. Andrew's
Episcopal church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. Loring speaks on "The Good
Side of Evil," Unitarian church.
Rev. Douglas, "Unto Us a Child is
Born," Congregational church,
10:30 o'clock.
Union get-together, 3:00 o'clock.
Bishop Williams speaks, Hill audi-
torium, 7:00 o'clock.

I

i
.

Ad. W. Liter says:-
There are but -.:- -:-

-:-

LEONARD

A. BARRETT

2-
more shopping days before you
leave for your Christmas vaca-
tion.
Mr. Student, are you heeding
the holidayads?
Mr. Merchant, are you adver-
tising?
* * * * * * * * * * *

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I

CHRISTMAS SERVICE
University Bible Glasses at Noon

*
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*

i..f.... ° " °°' 1

L

Tonight
Tonight

The Comedy Club Play
AT THE
HITNEY THEATRE

Tonight
Tonight

_

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