100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HE DAILY
$2.50
NEIVS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

The

igan

Daily

Phones:-Editorial 2
Business
TELEGRAPH SERVICE 1
"NEW YORK SUN

,Vol.XXVI. No. 6. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1915. PRICE FIVE

YOSTMEN BACKIN
FORM HAND kMOUNT
UNION 3

UNION cAMpAIGNERS ARE
CONFIDENT OF SECURING
AF MILLION BY OCT.15
Coinplee Reports of Half-Month's
Nation-Wide Campaign to be
in by That Time

TEAM ShOWS IMPROVEMENT
'UsSLE MITIf FAST OHIO
ELEVEN

IN

TOTAL

OF CONTRIBUTIONS UP
TO DATE NEARLY $250,000

BACKFIELD WORKS EFFECTIVELY
Who Will Prove Regular Pilot Still
Problem; Six Quarterbacks
Take Field
Exhibiting a brand of football vastly,
superior to that displayed last
Wednesday, Coach Yost's warriors
soundly trounced Mount Union yes-
terday afternoon. The final figures
were 36 to 0.
The mere score is really an insig-
nificant and minor detail in many re-
spects, for it wasn't simply an accu-
mulation of points that pleased the'
coach and Michigan followers, as
much as it was the gratifying im-
provement in every department. The
line mnwas opening much bigger holes
than it provided for the boys carry-
ing the ball last Wednesday, and all
of the backs plunged.through repeat-
edly for big gains. "Rummy" Roehm
handled the team in a decidedly cred-
itable manner during the time that
he was in, while Sharpe performed
well during the few minutes allotted
to him during the last half.
"Jack" Benton kept himself in the
limelight continually, and Maulbetsch
acted just'like the "Maullie" of yore,
which is - equivalent to writing vol-
umes. "Pat" Smith proved more or
less conclusively that he isn't a much
over-rated athlete, and "Pat's" rating
is rather high just at present.
Benton drew the center of the stage,
right off the reel. "Jack" kicked off,
and then hurried down the field and
nailed the man with the ball. When
"Rummy" Roehm picked a forward
pass out of the atmosphere a moment
later it was Michigan's ball. Benton
dropped back and neatly booted a goal
from placement from the 38-yard line,
and Michigan chalked up three points.
Michigan scored a touchdown short-
ly afterwards, when Bentor, and Maul-
Detsch collaborated and produced a
couple of beautiful dodging runs.
"Jack" intercepted a pass and rax
15 yards to the 37-yard line. "Maul-
lie" dodged, squirmed, twisted and
fought his way down to the one-yard
line in one of the prettiest runs of the
day. The team lined up, the "Dutch-
man" caught his breath, and then
ploughed over. Benton goaled.
Realizing that they were far out-
weighed, Mount Union resorted to the
aerial attack early in the game, and
it literally rained forward passes
when they had the ball. At one time
during the struggle they completed
three in a row, but a five-yard pen-
alty placed them one yard behind the
point from which they started.

SPRINGFIELD HOLDS MONSTER
MASS MEETING TO ROUSE
"PEP"'
Complete reports from all commit-
tees engaged in the Michigan Union's
nation-wide campaign for $1,000,000
will be received on Friday, when the
30-day canvass will be half over, and
those in charge of the work are con-
fident that by that time close to $500,-
000 will have been subscribed. An-
other report will be asked for on Oc-
tober 20, and daily reports will be
sent in during the closing week of the
campaign, when, the final effort will
be made to raise the huge sum.
While many committees have not
been heard from since the last figures
were given out, the most recent avail-'
able totals place the Union contribu-
tions at°$250,000, exclusive of student
subscriptions. Counting the money
received from students, the grand to-'
tal amounts to $350,000.
Sprg'field held a monster mass'
meeting last night, with representa-
tive alumni from central Illinois pres-
ent to keep the enthusiasm of all for-
mer Michigan men in that section of
the state stirred up, and with a large'
committee hard at work, the district
is sure to be heard from before the;
end of the month.
The local committees all over the
country are racking their brains to
devise new means to keep the Union
workers going at top speed, for, with
but four weeks in which to raise the
immense sum, those in charge of the'
campaign realize that it will take the1
united efforts of every one of the
3,000 men engaged in the work to
make the clubhouse a reality.
The Detroit committee has already
raised $102,000 of its $250,000 allot-
ment, and the workers in the state
metropolis are confident that they will
be able to turn in the remainder of'
the quarter of a million dollars by
October 30. The Detroit committee
has organized the work by classes,
with 16 committees appointed to work
among the alumni classes graduating
from 1890 to 1915.
TWO BIBLE STUDY CLASSES TO
START IN ,HARRIS HALL TODAY
"Comparative Religion" and "The
Bible as a Book of Life" are the sub-
jects of the two religio.us study classes
that will be inaugurated at 9:30
o'clock this morning in Harris hall.
The classes will be under the direc-
tion of Prof. Campbell 1onner, of the
Greek department, and Prof. Leroy
Waterman, of the department of Se-
mitics.

KAISER REPORTED
TO HAVE LEFT FOR
FRONT AT SERVIA
DISPATCH SHOWS GRAVITY OF
SITUATION IN THE
'BALKANS
GERMANS GAIN IN BELGRADE
FRENCH CLAIM TEUTONS ARE
USING DEADLY GASES AGAIN
IN CHAMPAGNE
Amsterdam, Oct. 9.-The gravity of
the situation in the Balkans was
shown by a report that Kaiser Wil-
helm left today for the Servian front.
A dispatch from Sofia today said
that Czar Ferdinand will act as com-
mander-in-chief of the Bulgarian ar-
mies in the Balkan strife. War Min-
ister Kehoff will serve as field com-
mander.
Germans Advance in Belgrade
Berlin, Oct. 9 (wireless via London)
-A dispatch says that the invading
German forces have succeeded in tak-
ing the greater part of Belgrade to-
day. Co-operating with them, the
Bulgarian army has destroyed most
of the railway connections between
Belgrade and Saloniki by blowing up
a large bridge at the latter city.
Germans Lose on Western Front
Paris, Oct. 9.---A statement given
out today by the French war office
announces that the Germans have lost
heavily in their attempt to regain the
ground lost in the Arras region about
Loos. Columns and mass formations
were tried by the Teutons, but only
at one point were they able to recover
any of the lost territory.
In the Champagne region the Ger-
mans are again using shells filled with
asphyxiating gases, the statement con-
tinued.
On the western border of the Ar-
gonne the activity of the French bat-
teries silenced the German cannonade
against the French trenches.
In Lorraine the Germans sent out a
number of strong reconnoitering
forces to attack the French troops in
the forest of Parroy, but were com-
pletely repulsed.
MACK ND KAN[ EE
TO FILLVACANT MUNION
VICE-PRESIDENT POSTS
Ne-t ly-Appointed iien Will Appear on
Board of Directors at Next
Meeting
UNIVERSITY 'WOMEN ALLOWED
BE'ITER CHOICE FOR TICKETS
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO
HOLD REGULAR SESSION ON
MONDAYS
Members of the Michigan Union
Board of Directors gathered in the
smaller banquet hall in the clubho'mse
yesterday noon for a luncheon, after
which they held an important busi-
ness meeting, the first of the univer-
sity year.

To fill two vacancies among the
Union departmental vfce-presidernts,
Francis F. Mack, '16E, was appointed
vice-president for the Colleges of En-
gineering and Architecture, and Frank
J. Kane, '16D, was named vice-presi-
dent of the combined departments,
which are the dental, pharnic and
homeopathie divisions of the univer-
sity. These newly-appointed teen wil
(Continued on Page Six)

PLAN HOUSE TO HOUSE
CANVSS TO INCR9ESE
MEMBERSHIPOF UNION
nearly 100 Committeemen Will Invade
Roolhing Districts on Wednesday
and Thursday Nights
FIVE VICE-PRESIDENTS 'TO
HELP GAULT AND BALLENTINE
TO POSTPONE FACULTY CAM-
PAIGN TILL CLOSE OF BUILD-
ING CANVASS
Several men spent several hours
each at the Union clubhouse yester-
day in assisting President Harry G.
Gault, '17L, and. Membership Chair-
man D. R. Ballentine, '16, to arrange
for the house-to-house canvass booked
for Wednesday and Thursday nights.
Late last night the membership totals
were boosted close to the 1,900 mark,
which falls more than 100 short of the
last year record at this date.
Approximately 100 committeemen
will serve in the house-to-house in-
vasion of the city's rooming districts,
and letters will be mailed out to these
men some time today or tomorrow.
The men in charge expect to carry
the figures well past the 3,000 mark
before 10:30 o'clock strikes Thursday
night. The traditional committee or-
ganization of 10 sub-chairmen with
their committees has been altered this
year, so that the five Union vice-presi-
dents will lead the work under Gault
and Ballentine.
The campaign among the faculty
has been tentatively postponed until
after the close of the building cam-
paign, but every male student on the
campus will be interviewed during
this week. The names of a portion
of the house-to-house committee are
as follows: Delos Smith, '17; James
Bulkley, '17; John Neumann, 17E;
Gordon Mack, '18; Harry Wasson, '18;
William S. Dinwiddie, '18A, and C. S.
Scribner, '18E.
BEG I NC ANVASS FOR
2;g000 'Y'MEMBERS
Tuesday's Banquet at Newberry Hall
Will Give Campaign
Send-off

*:
*
*:
:x
*.
*
*:
:r

UlNITED STATES AND LATIN-AMERICA
REPUBLICS SANCTION RECOGNITiON
'CARRAgNZA ASPRESIDENT Of ME;

Reports of Yesterday's Games
Cornell, 46; Williams, 6.
University of Pennsylvania, 3;
Penn State, 13.
Princeton, 3; Syracuse, 0.
Harvard, 29; Carl-Mle, 7.
Yale, 7; Lehigh, 6.
+I. A. C., 76; Alma, 12.
Marietta, 27; Otterbein, 0.
O. S. U., 14; Case, 0.
Army, 22; Gettysburg, 0.
Pittsburgh, 47; Navy, 12.
Dartmouth, 20; Tufts, 7.
Amherst, 7; Brown, 0.
Bucknell, 0; Swarthmore, 3.
W. & J., 57; Lafayette, 0.
Chicago, 7; Northwestern, 0.
Wisconsin, 85; Marquette, 0.
Purdue, 26; Beloit, 0.
Oberlin, 49; Wooster, 0.

* * * * * *

* * * *

a ANNOUNCEMENT NOT EXI
AT CAPITAL UNTIL LA'
DATE
*
* 'I WILLFI6HtT TO TRE END

CARRIGANS MAKE
SERIES 50-50 By
WINNING SECOND

FOSTER WINS HIS OWN GAME
BRINGING IN DECISIVE
TALLY'

BYl

PINNEY APPOINTED

CRAIRMAN

The star individual performer for
the visitors was Quarterback Geltz,
who was everywhere at once. The
Mount Union offensive was built
around this player, and justifiably so.
Gletz proved an adept at receiving
passes and no less proficient in throw-
ing the same.
Perhaps as spectacular bit of play
as was staged during the afternoon
was provided by Maulbetsch. Along
in the second half "Maullie" ran 61
yards for a r'ouchdown, and it seemed
as though about every man on the
Mount Union team had to be dodged
or bowled over by the German bullet
before he attained the final stripe.
Just to show that it wasn't an acci-
dent, he duplicated later in the game,
but was called back, since one 'of his
mates transgressed the rules and
(Continued on Page Three)
Lyman Howe at the 'Whitney
Picturesque Holland, quaint bridges,
interesting Belgium, architectunait
gems and statuary at the two Cali-
fornia expositions, a ride on a sub-
marine, a trip through the Panama
Canal and other delightful and in-
structive features will be presented
by Lyman Howe at the Whitney
October 19.

WHAT'S GIONG ON

"Largest as well as the oldest stu-
dents' Y. M. C. A. in the country."
This, according to the committee un-
der the direction of Henry Rummel,
'16L, will be the motto given to the 125
men who will gather at a banquet at
Newberry hall at 5:30 o'clock Tues-
day evening, at which time this year's
"Y" membership campaign for 2,000
members will be started.
All committees have been picked
and the necessary plans gone over
and determined upon. N. E. Pinney,
'16, has been secured to act as execu-
tive chairman of the campaign, while
William Klinestacker, '16D, will serve
as executive secretary. A ' special
committee under the direction of Wil-
lis D. Nance, '17, and Kemp S. Burge,
'17, has been organized to make a spe-
cial canvass of the fraternity men.
Last year's plan of campaign will
be followed out. The whole rooming
section has been mapped out and the
men will each be given one block to
canvass.
Former Student Leads in Examination
William Conke, '15P, . of Lincoln,
Illinois, stood highest in the recent
Illinois state civil service examina-
tions. While in the university Conke
was admitted to Aristolochite pharmic
honorary society.

RED SOX TALLY TEN SAFETIES
Victory Comes in Ninth, When Boston
Twirler Singles, Scoring1
Gardnerl
Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 9.-Carri-
gan's Red Sox made the count one and
one by nosing out a ninth-inning vic-t
tory over the Phillies in the second
game of the series for the baseballe
championship of the world. Foster
twirled the entire route for the bean-
eaters, letting the Quakers down witht
only three hits, and capped the day'st
work by hitting the single which re-t
sulted in scoring the winning run.
Hooper started things for his teamf
by drawing a walk in the. opening in-
ning. Speaker singled, sending Hoop-
er to third. Burns pegged to second,
where Niehoff caught Speaker in a
comatose condition and put the ball
on him. In the meantime Hooper had
started toward home, and would have
been an easy out, but Burns muffed
Niehoff's peg, allowing Hooper to
Score.
Maver, for the Phillies, had the Red
Sox swinging on his stuff in the next
two. stanzas, striking out five of Car-
rigan's men. Later Boston began to
hit Mayer more freely, but the Phil-
lies' pitcher ,kept out of the danger
zone right up to the ninth inning.
In the fifth Phifadelphia evened the
count by pushing Cravath across the
plate for their only score. "Gavvy"'
led off with a two-bagger, and checked
in when Luderus repeated wjth a dou-
ble past Speaker in center field.
Whitted, Niehoff and Burns went out
in rapid succession, leaving Luderus
to his fate on third.
(Continued on Page Three)
CANDIDATES FOR UNIVERSITY
SYMPHONY TO MEET THIS WEEK
University Symphony candidates
will meet at the school of music be-
tween 7:00 and 8:00 o'clock next
Wednesday and Thursday evenings.
This work is open to all advanced
musicians and everyone is asked to
bring with them a couple of familiar
pieces. The first rehearsal will be,
held at 2:30 o'clock next Sunday aft-
ernoon.
G'ives $00,000 for New Gymnasiumj
Exeter, N. H., Oct. 9.-Charles H.
Thompson today completed arrange-
ments for a gift to the Exeter acad-
emy of $100,000 for the erection of a
new gymnasium.

Unrecognized General Calls Move the
Worst Possible for Welfare "
of His Country
Washington, Oct. 9.-The United*
States and the Latin-American repub-
lics today officially sanctioned the
recognition of Carranza as provision-
al president of Mexico. A meetirgg
was held here today, but the general
opinion previous to the announcement
was that the recognition of Carranza
would not come until a later time.
.The reason assigned for the de-
cision made by the representatives
was that Carranza is the only man
in Mexico who possesses the essen-
tials necessary for recognition as
president. It was thought that he is
the only man in the country who
could restore and maintain peace.
Although the matter has not been
thoroughly discussed, Secretary of:
State Lansing said that the recogni-
tion of Carranza probably would mean
the institution of all possible discour-
agement to his opponents. The lay-.
ing of an embargo on arms to Mexico
is considered the most important aid,
that can be given to the Carranza
party.
It is more than likely that Amer-
ican bankers will be called upon in,.
the near future to supply funds for
putting Mexico on a firm financial
basis. This duty naturally falls to
the lot of the United States, as she
is one of the countries vitally inter-
ested in the settlement of affairs in
Mexico, and also because of the fact
that none of the European powers are
in any condition to lend money for
outside interests.
El Paso, Texas, Oct. 9.-"I will fight
to the end," announced General Villa
today when he heard of the recogni-
tion of Carranza as provisional presi-
dent by the United States and Latin-
American countries. He further said
that Carranza's recognition 'was the
worst possible move for the welfare
of Mexico.
TO STAGESANNUA
Under Classmen Begin Struggle With
Traditional Flag Rush and
Cane Spree
PLAN FOR "PEP"3 MASS MEETINGS
Underclassmen will fight their an-
nual fall battle Saturday morning on
Ferry field, according to members of
the student council who have the af-'
fair in charge. The fall games will
consist of the flag rush and the cane
spree as usual. R. S. Collins, '16, has
been appointed chairman of the event.
"Pep" mass meetings are being
planned for both of the underclasses
by Wilson Schaffer, '16. On Wednes-
day evening the class of 1918 will
gather in west physics lecture room
for its pre-contest session, and the
freshmen will meet there Thursday
evening. Talks will be made to the
underclassmen at their respective
meetings by prominent upperclassmen
and members of the student council
will be on hand to instruct the con-
testants in the rules to be observed
in the games.
Miss Covington Arrives in New York

New York, Oct. 9.-Miss Lucile Cov-
ington, who is suing the Rev. John
Wesley Hill, the president of the In-
ternational Peace Forum, for $100,000
damages for breach of promise ar-
rived here today. In an interview her
counsel stated that Miss Covington
had nothing further to say in regardA
to the suit.

TODAY
Prof. H. A. Quitmeyer, of Detroit,
speaks at the St. Paul's Evangelical
Lutheran church, .10:15 o'clock.
Rev. L. C. Douglas speaks on "The
Luxury of Being Unafraid," First
Congregational church, 1:30 o'clock.
Bishop H. C. Stuntz lectures on "The
Two Amreicas," First M. E. church,
7:30 p. m.
Sermon, "Are Sin, Disease and Death
Real?" First Church of Christ, Sci-
entist, 10:30.o'clock.
Rev. L. A. Barret speaks on "The Ne-
cessity for an Ideal," First Presby-
terian church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. W. C. Miller speaks on "A Sure
Answer," Trinity English Lutheran
rh eh, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. '. W. Knepper speaks on "In a
Strange Land," Church of Christ
. (Disciples), 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. F. B. Bachelor speaks on "Christ,
the Source of Wisdom and Knowl-
edge," First Baptist church, 1:30
o'clock.

WESLEYAN CUILD LECTURE
Bishop Homer C. Stuntz
OP BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA, RESIDENT BISHOP OF THE P1. E. CHURCH
FOR SOUTH AMERICA
"The Two Americas"
To-Night at 7:30, Methodist Church

TOMORROW
Master Masons' smoker,
Union, 7:30 o'clock.

Michigan1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan