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December 15, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-15

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THE DAILY
NEW OF THE $WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

The,

ich igan

Daily

Phones:--Editorial 2414
f Business 960
TELEGRA:'PH SEIMCE BY u E
NEW YORK SUN
PRICE FIVE CENTS

VOL. XXVI. No. 62.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1915.

n

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GOO0 FELLOWS TO
AID MOVEMENT BY
8 ALE iOF LECTURE PASTEBOARDS
To BE COMPLETED
TODAY
ORGANIZED BODIES MAY MEET

COMEDY CLUB SEEKS TO STAGE OPER A
CAMPUSPLYHOUSE TRYOUTS TONIGHT,

MARKHAM PLEASESI
AUDL0NE BY TALK

Societies Askel to Tiirn
Trees in For
Ho spital

Christmas

* HAVE YOU BOUGHT YOUR
TICKET FOR THE GOOD FEL-
LOW TRAVELO(UES IN THE
* HIGH SCHOOL TONIGRTl IF
* NOT, GET ONE TOl)AY,
* SUME IN EITHER WAHR'S,
* IEEIIAN'S OR ILUSTON
SBR(OS, THEY ARE 10 CENTS.
* * * * * * * * * * *

*
.*
*
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*
*
*
*
*

Fonuds Front"The Professor's Love
Story" to Hell Build Pro-
posed Theatre
A campus theatre to house student
dramatic productions, is the project
connected with the Comedy club play,
"The Professor's Love Story," which
will be staged at the Whitney theatre
next Saturday night.
Student dramatic activities at Mich-
igan have been weakened, say the club
leaders, by the lack of facilities on the
campus to, provide for scenic produc-
tions. It is impossible to stage a play
requiring the use of drops and lifts,
in Hill auditorium.
"A campus theatre for Michigan is
a thing greatly to be desired," was
the statement made last night by Prof.
Louis A. Strauss, chairman of the fac-
ulty committee on student affairs.
"The project has my approval and
support."
The Union Opera, the Mimes, the
Jratorical association play, and the
Junior Girls' Play, as well as the
Comedy club, would derive great im-
mnediate benefit from such a campus
theatre as is proposed. Union Opera
ind musical club officials have already
given their hearty endorsement to the
plan. The proposed campus play
house, according to the sponsors for
she movement, is designed to enable
student dramatic undertakings to be
produced at the most suitable times
and in a place conveniently accessible.
RHETORIC INSTRUCTORS
MEET UNVRIYMEN

nIUPes
MANY PARTS TO BE ASSIGNED
Initial cast tryouts for the 1916
Union Opera will be held in the Alpha
Nu rooms on the fourth floor of Uni-
versity hall, at 7:00 o'clock tonight.
Due to the fact that this year's opera
offers exceptional opportunity for in-
terpreters of female roles, and an un-
usual demand for the typical American
young man type, it is estimated that
a large number will be on hand for
the first tryout.
Those who try out tonight will be
judged principally on their stage
presence and their ability to sing and
dance. Parts will be assigned to those
who show signs of talent, and shortly
after Christmas a general tryout will
be held, at which time the men can
give their parts. The committee in
charge intends to assign at least three
or four men for each part in the cast.
Theodore Harrison and Earl V.
Moore, of the School of Music, and
Prof. J. R. Brumm of the rhetoric de-
partment, will act as members of the
judging committee, to be assisted by
George McMahon, '16, and Theron D.
Weaver, '16E.
DETAILDBRESON FOR
RECLL IS WITHHELD

At 8:00 o'clock tonight in the high
school auditorium, Regent Junius E
Beal and Prof. John R. Allen will de-
liver travelogues on Russia and Tur-
key, respectively,,under the auspices
of the local chapter of the Sons of the
American Revolution. The officials
of the S. A. R. have contributed sev-
eral hundred of the tickets to the
Good Fellow fund. They are only 10
cents, and if you haven't already
bought one, secure one, sure, today
in either of the State street book
stores, or in Huston Bros.
L a communication received by the
Cood Fellow Editor yesterday, several
of the student societies in the local
churches have offered to cooperate
with the Good Fellows and distribute
their Christmas cheer through the
medium of the campus organization.
It is likely that a meeting of all or-
ganized bodies on the campus who ar(
u=deitaking the Christmas relief wort
will be called for some time tomor-
row.
At the ┬░meeting of the federation of
student pastors held yesterday a res
olution promising hearty support o
the Good Fellow movement was pass-
ed, and all the members present prom.
ised the support of their organizations
in the 'furtherance of the work.
Mrs. Charles A. Vernou, 920 Bald-
win avenue, in a communication tc
the Good Fellows yesterday, said that
she had charge of the Christmas enter-
tainment for the 65 children in the
university hospital. To insure the
success of the undertaking this year,
she requests that all men or womer.
on the campus who are able to do so
send her money or gifts for the hos-
pital "kiddies." She, also request:
that the Christmas trees which have
been left over from fraternity an(
other society parties be sent direct tc
the university hospital, addressed tc
her so that the celebration for the
children may be as elaborate as pos-
sible. It is also her earnest sugges-
tion and desire that all organized
bodies preserve the toys which they
hav e had in their celebrations, and
send the same to her. Her tel-
ephone is 1435, and any individuals or
organizations who may desire further
information on the matter are re-
ouested to get into immediate com-
munication with her.
A number of contributions in the
form of money were received today.
and requests on the part of several
campus organizations for children to
provide a Christmas for, were filled
by the Good Fellows.
There are only six days left before
the Good Fellows leave for home, and
wiere are still many needy cases to
be taken care of. All men and wo-
men, faculty included, on the campus
who have not done something in sup-
port of the Good Fellows, are asked
to get in touch with the Good Fellow
Editor at once.

OpPOrtunity for Interpreters
miale Character

of Fe. I Poet

Quotes Own Works; Gives
planmation of Prposeof
Poetry

Ex.

Second Faculty Night of Year Held I German Embassy Considers Decision

for West Hall
Faculty
Faculty members from the rhetoric
lepartment and all students interested
ni that line of work will meet in an
informal "get together" tonight from
.30 to 9:00 o'clock at the Michigan
Jnion clubhouse. This will be the
second faculty night of the year and a
'arge attendance is expected.
Offering the student an opportunity
) having an informal talk with the
big men of his department and bene-
'itting his own life from contact with
men of greater experience than he, the
aculty night presents a strong appeal
to the young undergraduate. The
?opularity of such meetings last year
ittests to their value and the commit-
tee in charge hopes that the students
will avail themselves of the oppor-
tunity.
To each meeting a different group
of faculty men and students is in-
vited. The first meeting was for the
members of the history, fine arts, and
English departments, and different de-
)artments will be invited every week
>r two until all the departments have
participated.
Tonight's gathering will be entirely
informal. No special music or
speeches have been arranged, and the
evening will be given over to allowing
the student to form as many acquaint-
ances as possible.
Clevelanders to Engage Special Car
Residents of Cleveland and those
who pass through that city on their
way home for the holidays will be
offered the privilege of a special car
for the journey. The car will leave
at 1:50 Tuesday afternoon on the Ann
Arbor road. Those desiring places in
the car should apply to Kirk Millhoff
at the Michigan Union desk today.
Republicans Decide on Chicago
Washington, Dec. 14.-The Repub-
lican National committee this evening
decided to hold the next Republican
National convention in Chicago. The
convention will assemble on June 7.

of Unfriendly
Nature
Washington, Dec. 14.-The state de-
partment today formally refused to
offer detailed reasons for the recall of
Captains Boy-Ed and von Papen by'
the German government. This mes-
sage was sent both to Count Bern-
storff and to Berlin, and was com-
mented upon at the German embassy
here, as being "very unfriendly."
Secretary Lansing is immovable on
the ground that mere significations by
this government that the two attaches.
are "persona non grata," is sufficient
reason for the immediate removal.
Serious discussion has been in
progress about demanding the re-
moval of the German ambassador,
Bernstorff, and analysts of the situa-
tion in the east state that the strain
between Germany and the United
States is at its most tense stage since
the genesis of the conflict.
Austrians Present Alibi
London, Dec. 14.-Definite asser-
tions have reached here from Aus-
tria, that the Vienna government was
fully prepared to meet the demands
of the United States, and that they
had prepared an elaborate alibi which
they will soon send to Washington.
The Austrians will contest the third
thesis of the note, and will protest
that the note goes too far.
The Austrian alibi consists of the
following points: (1) 'the officers
wirelessed that they sunk the Ancona
in self-defense; (2) the submarine
also sent out wireless for help imme-
diately before torpedoing the vessel;
(3) the submarine was soon after
sunk by the entente allies, and no
first-hand information is available.
The note will be evasive as the
Lusitania follow-up arrangements
were. Many officials in Vie ma are
strong for immediate de laration of
war, but the sentiment is likely to
prevail, through pressure from Ber-
lin, that war between Austria and the
United States must be avoided for the
present.

MAXIMS KEEP UP GOOD HUMOR
"Unless we add a touch of poetry to
theactual, we do not get the rounded
truth. Poetry makes no apologies; it
comes by divine right. It reveals what
no other ting can reveal. The reve-
lations of poetry are always true,
while the hypotheses of science con-
tinually pass out. Poetry will always
be true, on earth and in heaven, and
it will be true in eternity."
This is the explanation of poetry
given by Edwin Markham to an audi-
ence of several hundred in University
hall last night. Throughout the talk,
the audience was kept in a continual
state of good humor by the remarks
and maxims of the speaker, which in-
cluded the following:
"Genius is the power to take a hint."
"Silence is the best substitute for
wisdom."
"Wisdom consists in knowing what
to do next."
"The poet survivesbecause he has
made good" continued the author.
"le serves a purpose; he fills a need.
You are all poets. I seldom talk to
a man who does not in about five min-
utes pull a manuscript from his inside
pocket and tell me that he himself
has dabbled in poetry. All human at-
tainments may be divided into two
classes, represented by science and
art. The scientist is the investigator;
the artist is the revealer. What the
poet reveals he sees to be true in his
imagination; he does not experiment.
The old preachers used to divide their
sermon into several parts. First, they
gave a logical statement; and when
they .had exhausted logic, they always
turned to their audiences and said,
'Now let us open our books and sing.
And so, at the end of logic, we must
turn to poetry for the higher revela-
tion which logic can never give us,
but which is yet precious and essen-
tial to the soul. Poetry is the imag-
inative expression of the unfamiliar
beauty of the world-the beauty that
is the smile upon the fact of truth.
Poetry is the cry of the heart in the
presence of the wonder of life."
Mr. Markham then read his 'Lin-
coln," "Child of My Heart," "Poet
Lore," and "The Man With the Hoe."
He closed with a quatrain from his
latest book, "The Shoes of Happiness,'
entitled, "Outwitted:"
"He drew a circle that shut me out-
Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout.
But Jove and I had the wit to win:
We Cfrew a circle that shut him in."
NEW YORK MANAGING EDITOR
WILL TALK ON IOURNALISM
To Outline Preparation For News.
paper Work and Its
Opportunities
W. W. Harris, managing editor of
the New York Sun, will speak Thurs-
day afternoon, December 16, at 4:00
p. m., in room 202, West hall, on "Op-
portunities in Journalism."
The purpose of the lecture will be
to give intending journalists practical
help in entering their chosen field.
He will outline the kind of prepara-
tion best adapted for newspaper work,
tell how to get into the profession,
and, having gotten into it, how to re-
alize its opportunities. The lecture
will touch upon the work of editors
and editorial writing, on the duties of
a reporter, and in general on the or-
ganization of the forces of the news-
paper. Mr. Harris will dwell partic-
laurly on the work of gathering the
news of the present war.
Ellen Sargeant, '16, has been chosen
chairman of the spring pageant com-
mittee of the Women's League.

ALLIES KEEP GERMAS
SHUT IN: WANT PAYMENT
Premier Asquith I ells lommons That
Ministerial Salaries Will
Not Be Cut
London, Dec. 14.-The German mer-
cantile flag will not be permitted to
appear oil the high seas until Ger-
many has paid indemnity for every
vessel of the allies sunk by German
submarines or other vessels of war.
That is one of the peace terms which
England and her allies intend to fight
for, and for which they will keep on
fighting no matter how long the war
will last. The statement was mad:
today in a high governmental source,
and it was said that all of the allies
have practically pledged themselves
to this condition.
London, Dec. 14.-Premier Asquith,
sloaking in the House of Conmorr
today, said that he did not propos,
to 'recommend the reduction of min-
isterial salaries, and added t iat h-
would not consider it justified on the
grounds of economy and efficiency.
The army vote has been postpoed
u-idl nec wt ow in,%, to the imos-
sibility of obtaining complete detaiis
at present of the results of Ioev
D, rby's recruiting scheme.
The Rigl-t Hon. Harold J. Teanant,
under seceary o4 war, reply:n; 'o a
question in the House of Commons to-
,ay, said that Turkey had 650,000 men
in the field, and that the number mi"ht
be increased to one million.;
A white paper issued by the war
office today, and mentioned in the
Commons, announces that the esti-
nate for the year ending March 31,
1916, provides for one million addi-
tional men, bringing the total strengthf
of the army up to four million men.-
This number includes British troops
serving in India and also includes co-
lonials.-f
Firing Keeps Up Near Gorizia
Vienna, Dec. 14.-Part of Gorizia,
on the road to Saint Peter, is again1
under artillery fire. The Italian at-t
'acks, during continued activities in
Giudicaria, have been repulsed.
British Steamer Goes Under 1
London, Dec. 14-The British steam-
ship Orteric has been sunk and two
nembers of the crew killed. Two
ethers were wounded. The Orteric was
of 6,535 tons.

GERMANIC &LLIES
ANDENTENTEBOTH
COERGtNG GREECE
ANGLO-FRENCH COM1DIENCIN0 A
IILQCIKADE OF KINGDOM'S
PORTS TO FORCE TERMS
DUI.GAR WEDGE GAINS VICIORY
Entire Town Near Serb Border Fired
From Teutonic Bomibard-
luent
Athncis, Dec: 14.-Simultaneous with
reports of Bulgarian victories in
eastern Montenegro and north of ea-
lorili. the t crmnarn allis served no-
tice en the Greek government that
they intended to "pursue the Anglo-
French into the sea." The Teutons
Ctreai ;n instant invasion of Greece,
l:relvs.; 'h, kingdom disarms or ex-
pel ;ihe expeditionaries. At the same
time, the entente has begun a com-
n ~rcial embargo of all Greek ports,
in order to ecrce a satisfactory ex-
p<anrtion from the Greek government,
B ulga'r is Wedge Anglo-French
Lc don, 'Dec. 14.-A detailed ac-
co,at c f thi last ehase of the battle
on the sci'heastern corner of Serbia,
f-sned by the Bulgarian war office to-
day. s' cmet that while the British
stood the brunt of the Bulgar on-
slaught, west of Goriami just over the
Greek frontier, the French forces too
were badly cut up. It reported the
the disastrous retreat of the allies ,
from Serbian Macedonia was caused'
mainly by a Bulgarian wedge driven
between the British and French.
At the same time that the main Bul-
garian army swept down west of Lake
Gorian, another strong Bulgarian
force, coming down along the Nish-
Saloniki railway, battered the French
with ever-increasing force on their
position north of Gheztheli, and broke
the allies' line at the point where the
British and French were in contact.
This force formed the fatal wedge,
badly cutting up the French,
The meaning of the Bulgarian
and German statement, "the pursuit
continued," holds now the key to the
question whether the Bulgarians and
Germans or either intend to push the
drive over the boundary, thus making
northern Greece the battle ground.
Germans Devastate Russ Lands'
London, Dec. 14.-Desolation, like
that of Louvain, is reported wherever
Germans have spread over the Rus-
sian provinces of Kovno, Courlandl
and other parts of Russia. This was
under the direction of Marshal von
Hindenburg. Information has reachbed
the authorities here that more than
2,000,000 Russians end other natives
have been killed by the Germans, alid
that their homes and towns have been
utterly demolished. It is said that for
hundreds of miles not a house has
been left standing, and persons who
have escaped from the district tell
stories of barbarities perpetrated by
the German soldiers.

_WHAT'S GOING O
TODAY
[llustrated Travelogues, High school
auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Eastern Star, Masonic Temple, even-
ing.
Kentucky club, meets, Michigan Un-
ion, 7:30 o'clock.
Northwestern club Christmas dance,
Packard academy, 9:00 o'clock.
Opera cast tryouts, Alpha Nu rooms,
7:00 o'clock.
Fresh Mandolin club rehearsal, room
205, N. W., 7:00 o'clock.
Tau Beta Pi dinner, Union, 6:00
o'clock.
Senate Council meets, president's
room in U-Hall, 8:00 o'clock.
All-Fresh Glee club meeting, McMil-
lan hall, 7:00 o'clock.
X-Architects meet, 312 Eng. building,
4:45 o'clock.
Band meets in U-Hall, 7:00 o'clock.
Barristers luncheon, Delta Cafe, 12:15
o'clock.
Faculty night, Michigan Union, 7:30
o'clock.
Fresh Eng. assembly, 348 Eng. build-
ing, 11:00 o'clock.

Border Town In Flames
London, Dec. 14.-The following of-
ficial statement from the Anglo-French
headquarters at Saloniki was received
here today: "The whole town of
Ghezeheli, near the Greek border, is
in flames, following the Bulgarian
bombardment."

W. W.
4:00
Senior
Eng.
Junior
Eng.

TOMORROW
Harris speaks, room 202 W.
o'clock.
engineer assembly, room
building, 8:00 o'clock.
engineer assembly, room
building, 11:00 ,o'clock.

348,

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Ad. W. Ricer says:-
There are but - - -:- -:-
5

R"

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more shopping days before you
leave for your Christmas vaca-
tion.
Mr. Student, are you heeding
the holiday ndsf
Mr. Merchant, are you adver-
tisingf
* * * * * * * * *. **

Sophomore
348, Eng.
Senior law
o'clock.

engineer
building,
dance,

assembly, room-
10:00 o'clock.
Granger's, 9:00

Ih ma

15c

THE

GARGOYLE

C

THE SNAPPIEST THING OUT

:. PURE BLACK AND WHITE

FOR SALE EVERY WHERE

"I _ Y

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