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December 14, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DAILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD'AND
THE CA-31PUS

ihe

I A igan

V9
,Dali

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPHI SERV ICE BY -T)
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXV. No. 61.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CE

- ,

CHARITY LEADERSI
SELECT FRIDAY AS
GOOD FELLOW DAY

Lansing r d icator EDWIN MAKHAM SPEAK
Accider tally Shot
Edward P. Cummings, '93, Is Injured
While Cleaning Shotgun HIS POEMS IIIVLETTERS
in Cellar.

JOVERY MiAN AND YV01IAN
THLE CAMPUS TO BE~
APPROACHED

ON.

MANY PROMISE TO ASSIST
Studcnt Groups, League House and
Local Orginizations Take Part
in Movement

**

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SEND IN THE COUPON
TODAY

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Good

Friday has been appointed

Fellow Day. At this day every man
and woman on the Michigan campus
will be approached in the interests of
the Good Fellow campaign, and dis-
tribution of the money and articles
received will be started. To thislend,
any local people who are willing to
contribute the use of their automo-
biles for next Friday afternoon, are
asked to communicate immediately
with the Good Fellow Editors, either
at The Daily office, or by calling 1132
or 1649.
Every day has seen a steady in-
crease in the number of boys and
girls and families to whom the Good
Fellows have promised a Christmas
visit, but there still remains much to
be done if every needy case is to be
taken care of.
A. number of house-clubs and fra-
ternities took action at their meetings
last night in aid of the movement,
and it is expected that definite an-
nouncement of tWk progress in the
campaign will be made tomorrow.
The sale of the tickets to the trav-
elogue lecture tomorrow evening ir'
the high school auditorium has pro-
gressed very well, according to the
report of the chairman in charge, and
it is expected that about $50.00 will
be realized from that source.
Several student groups have .volun-
teered to take care of an entire fam-
ily for a week; others have agreed to
take four, six or eight little boys and,
see that they have warm clothing and
at least one real Christmas toy. One
league house will see that the chil-
iren of the Day Nursery have a real
"honest-to-goodness" Christmas par-
ty, and another group of girls has
presented the nursery with a big doll
house.
The social service committee of the
Y. W. C. A. have offered to perform
their part as Good Fellows in a novel
way. For years, the Federated Chari-
ties have bought stockings for the
poor children's Christmas. These are
"really, truly" stockings guaranteed
to wear. One hundred and forty pairs
of these stockings have been pur-
chased, and university women, under
the direction of the chairman of the
social service work of the Y. W. C.
A., will fill each stocking with gifts.
These stockings will then be distrib-
uted under the auspices of the Asso-
ciated Charities and the Good Fel-
lows.

Lansing, Mich., Dec. 13.-Edward
P. Cummings, superintendent of pub-
lic schools of this city, and a man
well known in educational circles
throughout the state, accidentally shot
himself while cleaning a shotgun Sun-
day afternoon. The full charge of the
gun entered his body above his heart
and his life is dispared of. The acci-
dent occurred while Mr. Cummings
was cleaning a gun in the cellar in
company with his 12-year-old son.
Mr. Cummings is a graduate of the
University of Michigan of the class of
1893. He has been superintendent of
the Lansing public schools for 10
years and was president of the Michi-
gan State Teachers' association last
year.
BRUMIVISPEKSON
"COLLEGE BGIES;!
Gives Interesting Address Before
Freshman Literary Class
Assembly
"COLLEGE PLACE FOR STUDY"
Before a large audience Prof. John
R. Brumm yesterday addressed an
assembly of the freshman literary
class on the subect of "Some College
i3ogies" The speaker endeavored to
send home a number of the sterner
truths of life, and especially college
ife, under cover of anecdote and wit-
ticism. Professor Brumm has won a
reputation as a speaker and the
counds of applause that greeted the
important portions of his address
proved that the first yer men were
aware of his ability in that direction.
Following are excerpts from the ad-
dress:
Some College Bogeys
"A bogey, br bujgaboo, is an intang-
ible but altogether fearful something
which persistentlylurks just round
,he next corner, eager to engage the
luckless wayfarer in mortal combat.
It assumes many strange guises,
from the hobgoblins of nursery
rhymes to the obsession which per-
suades some of us that tAe world
would immediately cease to wag along
in its old familiar way if we were
suddenly to be eliminated from the
stage of action. Vigilance alone was
the price of safety. And in the course
of time Bluebeard and all his crim-
son hosts, reduced to thin nothing-
aess by virtue of our every wary de-
fensive, apparently gave over the
struggle, and the bogeys of our child-
hood were gone. But when we slip-
ped into the world of the brave
grown-ups we were assailed by new
oogeys. Some of these we soon came
to recognize as tragedies; old age,
the loss of health and friendship, the
pain of defeat and failure-bogies
hat strike terror to the hearts of
gray-headed boys. and girls. These
are the bogeys that cann t e easily
banished by closing the eyes and
thinking resolute thoughts.
The Faculty Bogey
"The first bogey is that which asu
over-active imagination finds person
ified in the faculty. This deep-seated
superstition that a college teacher
must necessarily have the instincts
of a Bluebeard, coupled with the en-
thusiasm of a crusader, is responsible
for an enormous waste of nervous
energy and a consequent loss of effi-
ciency, and even of self-respect.
The Bogey of Democracy
The second bogey is that which
masquerades under the name of "ste-
dent democracy." Almost any prac-
tice can gain credit if it can be made

to carry the label "democratic," and
(Continued on Page Six)

Speaker Considered Great Artist by
Prominent Writers of
Country
IECTUIR CALLED I Y MANY
'IUTICS "POET OF CENTURI"
EARLY LIFE IN CALIFORNIA WAS
A HARDSHIP; WAS FARMER
AND TEACHER
Edwin Markham, the poet, will
speak in University hall at 8:00
o'clock tonight on "Readings from the
Markham Poems with Running Comr-
'nest on Life and Letters." The
speaker is said to be a good enter-
tainer, and a large audience is ex-
pected to be present.
Ella Wheeler Wilcox considers Mr.
Markham "The Greatest Poet of the
Centuzry." The late Prof. William
(Continued on Page Six)
CROWD T CONERT
At Least ,00 People Attend Third
of Choral Union Series in
Hill Auditorium
ARTiST'S TECHNIQUE IMPRtESSIVE
At least 5,000 people were present
at the i hird of the Choral Union se-
ries of pre-festival concerts in Hil
auditori-.m last night when Mischa
Elman, world famous violinist, ap-
peared for his initial concert before
the music lovers of Ann Arbor. At
his first appearance on the stage, El-
man was applauded warmly.
His first number was the allegrc
movement of the Mendelssohn Con-
certo in E. minor. The artist was at
once lost to all the world but that
little one in which his imaginatioi.
dwelt. Technique is to Enana a key
to interpretation.
The beautiful cantatiti of th
"Faust" Fantasy evoked enthusiastic
applause. The artist acknowledged
graciouly with Sarasate's "Caprice
Basque, a charming encore number.
The "Orientale," of the famous Rus-
sian composer, Cesar Cui, fulfilled the
anticipation expressed in the title
The wizard of the bow gave evident
of his sympathy with the entente o
the composer.
The celebrated "Ave Maria," o
Schubert was the most appreciated o
the numbers on the program. The ar-
tist put his entire soul into the won-
derful harmonies, thirds and sixth
which have an appeal of themselves
but with Elman became heart throbs,
vital and ritiful, yet appealing to the
innate religious spirit in man.
The final program number, XPaga-
nini's "I Palpiti," was full of the
technicalities which demand the ut-
most of both artist and audience. El-
man came from this number bigger
than ever; he is a technician as well
as a dreamer of music.
This was to have finished the pro-
gram. Scarcely a person left his seat.
Elman was obliged to acknowledge
with two encores, Wieniawski's "Le-
gende," and Dvorak's "Humoresque."
The program of the concert follows:
Concerto, E Minor, Op. 64........
Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-47)
Allegro molto appassionato; an-
dante; allegro molto vivace
"Faust" Fantasy................
............Wieniawski (1835-1880)
"The Call of the Plains".........
.Goldmark (1872---)
"Orientale" ...Caesar Cui (1835- )
"Ave Maria" .....................
Schubert (1797-1828, Wilhelmj
(1843-1908)

I"La Chasse" ..a..Kreisler (175--)
"1 Palpiti"...... Paganini (1782-1844)

Hits Novel Point
J. M. Barrie's Play to Be Renderd at
Whitney Theater Saturday Night
Should Prove Interesting
Can a college professor be in love?
Certainly, but he probably won't
know it,
That, at any rate, is the answer giv-
en to this delicate question by the
Comedy Club play, "The Professor's
Love Story," which will be produced at
the Whitney theater next Saturday
night. The solution of the problem is
worked out in a distinctly modern set-
ting by J. M. Barrie, and has delighted
crowded houses during long runs in
New York, Chicago and London.
The play opens in the Professor's
study in ,London. Complications
emerge from the fact that the Profes-
sor's powers of concentration have
deserted him. Dr. Cousens, his friend
and physician, makes the startling dis-
covery that the professor is in love
with his pretty secretary, and that he
is blissfully unconscious of his mal-
ady and its cause.
Upon the aoctor's advice, the ab-
sent-minded professor runs away to
the country, accompanied, however,
by his charming secretary and pur-
sued by an aggressive dowager who
has decided to marry him. The secre-
tary, Miss Lucy, whose part is taken
by Phyllis Povah, '16, is persecuted
beyond endurance by the amorous
dowager.
Yielding to temptation in a moment
of desperation, she forestalls the dow-
ager in a ruse to elicit a proposal of
marriage and simulates a fainting fit,
which compels the Professor to clasp
ier in his arms. A proposal is not ac-
complished at this point, and still
further obstacles remain to provide
amusement before an end to the per-
plexity is reached.
As a novel method of advertising
he play, those in charge will dis-
tribute on the campus today 5,000
namphlets containing pictures taken
of scenes during rehearsals in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall.
rFCULTY MEMBERS
TO yMIEETTONIGHT
Students Invited to Attend Meeting
to Carry Out Purpose of
Gatherings
TNFORMALITY, PLANS KEYNOTE
Faculty members of the rhetoric
department and all students interest-
ed are invited to the second faculty
night of the year to be held tomor-
row night from 7:30 to 9:00 o'clock at
the Michigan Union clubhouse. In-
formality is the keynote of the Union
faculty-student meetings. There will
be no special program and no
speeches are to be made. The pur-
pose of the occasion is to offer an
opportunity for faculty and students
to get together.
All faculty members who have at-
tained these gatherings are enthusi-
astic in their support of the plan. Few
students realize the extent of the
benefit gained by the close contact
which may be had with some of the
big men of the university at these
functions. Professor Friday said in
a recent speech that the most im-
portant function of a university is the
development of a student's person-
ality, also stating that "perhaps the

greatest thing in education is the
meeting of inspiring and magnetic
personalities." Faculty nights offer
the students of this university an un-
paralleled opportunity to obtain this
association.
Faculty nights are to be continued
throughout the year at intervals of a
week or two. Different departments
will be invited to each meeting so
that before the end of the year all de-
partments will have participated.

ISSENTERS ON"PEAE
SHIP THRAE BREK
ON ILSON'S MESSAGE
Rev, Charles F. Aked, of San Fran.
Cisco, Leads Revolters; Judge
Lindsey and Others Stand Pat
FORD TRIES TO lEEP PEAC
McCL>URE, PUL'TSt1Ei, REF USNS
TO SIGN RIKSOLUTON;
CREAT ;S IORM
Aboard the Steamship Oscar II.,
(via Wireless, Steamship Noordam
and Cape Race, Newfoundland), Dec.
13.-The Rev. Charles F. Akedthrew
a wrench into the Ford peace ma-
chinery when he presented a resolu-
tion condemning President Wilson's
message on preparedness. There were
nine dissenters wo commended the
President and these nine headed by
Publisher S. S. McClure, may leave
the party at Christiana
Mr. Ford, who tried hard to keep
the parts of the missionary machine
assembled, and who was the first to'
sign the resolution, stated "this dec-
laration, since it is signed by the ma-_
jority, represents the sentiment of the
whole party. The minority must
stand with the majority. All are wel-
come."
,The declaration which Dr. Aked in-
troduced was proposed in secret by a?
committee composed of Miss Florence
Holbrook, the Chicago school teacher,
as chairman, Dr. Aked, Mrs. Joseph1
Fels, Rev. Deacon Lloyd Jones, and
Arthr L. Weatherly, secretary of the
Nebraskan Peach socicty.
Mr. McClre immediately refused te
sign it and a storm broke out in the
meeting. The others who refused
were Herman Bernstein, Senator
Helen Rin; Robinson of Denver,
Judge and Mrs. Ben Lindsey, Lars T.
Nelson, Governor Hanna of North
Dakota, Don E. Barry and H. N.
Wheeler.
MANY FEMALE ROLES IN OPERA
First Cast Tryouts to Fe Hld To-
morrow Eening'
Men who have any talent whatso-
ever in the portrayal of female char-
.cters are requested to appear at the
Michigan Union Opera cast tryouts to
be held in the Alpha Nu rooms at
7:00 o'clock tomorrow night. This
year's Opera calls for more female
roles than any heretofore, there be-
ing at least four important female
roles in the production. Men who
wish to tryout for roles are urged to
secure a costume of some sort.
The tryouts will be based mainly
on stage presence, singing and danc-
ing ability. The judging committee
will be composed of several faculty
members of the school of music, one
of the rhetoric department and sev-
eral members of the Opera commit-
tee.
WHAT'S GO4 ON
M. E. Adams speaks, Cercle Francais,
Tappan Hall, 5:00 o'clock.
Edwin Markham, U-hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Complimentary Concert, Hill audi-
torium, 8:30 o'clock.
TOMORROWI

Illustrated Travellogues, High School
auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Eastern Star, Masonic Temple, even-
ing.
Kentucky club, meets, Michigan Un-
ion, 7:30 o'clock.
Northwestern club Christmas dance,
Packard academy, 9:00 o'clock.
Opera cast tryouts, Alpha Nu rooms,'
7:00 o'clock.
Fresh Mandolin club rehearsal, room
205, N. W., 7:00 o'clock.

AU STROHUNMARY
MUST, REPLY TO
NOTE IN 2 WEEKS
PREDICT AUSTRIA'S REPLY WILL
BE FAVORABLE TO
DEMAND
ZWEIDINEK RUMOR UNSOUND
Austria Unable to Consider Charge
Until All Information Is
Secured
Washington, Dec. 13.-Austria will
not have more than two weeks longer
in which to comply with the demand
of the United States for satisfaction
in the Ancona controversy. Secretary
Lansing is understood to have so in-
formed Baron Zweidinek, charge
d'affaires of the Austrian embassy in
the course of a conference which he
had with him today.
The conference was sought by
Baron Zweidinek with the result that
the rumor was started in irrespon-
sible circles that the charge had re-
ceived instructions from his govern-
ment to demand his passpqrts. This
brought forth a categorical denial
from Secretary Lansing.
It is ' understood that Baron Zweid-
inek desired to know the secretary's
interpretation of the demand in the
American note that the reply from
Austria should be forthcoming
promptly. The Austrian government
is said to have asked on the' respon-
sibility of the charge who was with-
out any dispatches from his gover-
ment. The question probably was
prompted by Count von Bernstoff, the
German ambassador who conferred
with Baron Zweidinek prior to the
latter's conference with Mr. Lansing.
Following the intervxew a redic-
tion was freely made in responsible
diplomatic circle's that Austria will
comply with the American demands.
In this connection significance is at-
tached to the report from Vienna to
the effect that the Austrian govern-
"ment has found it impossible to 'get
into Communication with the com-
mander of the submarine which at-
tacked the Ancona The opinion was
expressed in diplomatic circles that
the commander will not be located.
The prediction was made that Aus-
tria's reply to the United States will
be that inasmuch as it has been im-
possible for her to get the command-
er's detailed version of the attack
Austria is not in position to consider
the charge in the American note tha
the submarine torpedoed the Ancons
while there were persons still or
board. It was contrary to the rules
issued by the Austrian government t
submarine commanders, therefore 411
is predicted that Austria will say tha
she cannot do otherwise than comp1
with the demand that the form of th
attack was "illegal and indispensi.
ble," make'reasonable reparation an
if the commander is subsequently lo
cated, punish him for the offense."
Gargoyle Will Appear at Noon Toda
The Michigan Gargoyle for th
month of December makes its appear
ance on the campus at noon today. Th
issue is said to possess the usual das
and-go generally attributed to th
publication, which qualities are, I
anything, added to by several snapp
and poignant editorials.
*

* Ad. W. ]titer says:-
* There are but -: - -: -
*
*6
* more shopping days before you
* leave for your Christmas vaca-
* tion.
* Mr. Student, are you heeding
the holiday ads?
* Mr. Merchant, are you adver-
* tising?
* * * * * * * * * * * *

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CHECK ONE
I live at No.-
street. I will be Santa Claus
to children. I will
provide a Christmas for one
family . I will give
clothes, books, or other useful
articles
Sign name here

* * * * * *

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.. l

S T. EVE.
DEC. 18th

THE

Co

EDY

CLUB

WILL GIVE

WHITNEY
THEATRE

"THE PROFESSOR'S LOVE STOY"

"A good, live, snappy, modern production."-Bacchus.

__________________________I

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