100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 12, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DAILY
$2.00
NEWS ?OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

TheL

f. -:

.
{! kM>-. Its i : i , ,
_ a Y "' '_,o '. .f!
, s
oY'.
'

I hones :-Editorial 2414
L IP'l SERYICE BY THE
TNEW YORK SU'N

VOL. XXVI. NO. 60.

ANN ARBOR, MiCIUTAN. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

..
. j

MSGHA ELMAN
HILL AUDITORIU
ItEAT VIOLINIST NOT MERELY
INSTRUMENT BUT INTERPRET-
JIR F UAIXN THOUGHT
iNES THREE VIEWS OF ART
Has Just Completed Nine New Com.
positions Empuasizing Musical
Beauties,
Mischa Elman, who appears in Hill
Auditorium tomorrow night at 8:00
o'clock, plays with all the fervor, with
al the passionate intensity of mean-
ing, which characterize the essentially
artistic temperament. He is nothing
but an artist. But to see the human
iinstruent before you; that instru-
rnent which is producing harmony
which would shame Orpheus of old
is sulficient to convince you that you
arein the presence of a master mu-
sician, not simply a violinist, but a
universal mind ready to interpret the
most subtle thought of the human
race.
You may be sure that a great mu-
sician like Elman has certain very
original thoughts upon the much-
hackneyed subject of art. He says:
"To hear a well-loved, well-remem-
bered piece is like having the warm
sun flash out from the clouds after a
shower.
"There is no tradition to the Art
of Music-it is simply what the artist
feels. Everything is dependent upon
the reading."
"Any violin virtuoso is the equal
technically of any . other. The dif-
ference is in the individual note im-
parted by the personality of the
player."
"The introduction of what I may
call modern feeling and expression
into classical works is something.
which must come and has come of
itself. For instance, undoubtedly' I
in common with all the other leading
virtuosi, play the Beethoven concerto
in quite a different style from the way
in which it was played in his own
day, but at the same time, if he could
hear it as it is played today, it is an
absolute certainty that a composer of
his immortal genius and catholicity
would approve of any rational differ-
ence in the reading which may exist.
"I have been asked very often to
teach. There was one instance in
which a lady telephoned day after
day to my summer home asking if
she might bring her son to study with
me. She was always politely put off
on one excuse or another, till finall
one day I told her, for the sake o'
ending the matter, that I was afraid
the fee, which would be necessary to
recompense me for my loss of tim
from other work, would probably be
more than she would care to pay. She
at once asked me to name my pricc
and I said $10 a lesson. You car
imagine my surprise when she ar-
rived promptly the next mornhig with
the boy and the fiddle case. Out of
(Continued on Page Six)

PROF.JOHN RK BRUMM 1
SPEAKS TOMORROW ON
ToPic-COLLEGE BO IES
Success in College Depends Upon
Getting Right Viewpoint
at Start
'FATIHERLY ADVICE" NOT TO
FIGURE IN ASSEMBLY ADDRESS
LARGE'ATTENDANCE NECESSARY
FOR CONTINUANCE OF
MEETINGS
When the first year literary stu-
dents assemble at 4:00 o'clock tomor-
row afternoon in the auditorium of
the Natural Science building, they will
not be greeted with the cut-and-dried
fatherly advice too often handed them.
In the person of Prof. John R. Brumm,
of the Rhetoric department, chief
;peaker of the day, 'they will come
face to face with a man capable of
sympathizing with them, and of un-
derstanding the complexity of the
problems which confront those enter-
ing a large university for the first{
time.-
"There is a perspective," said Pro-
?essor Brumm in an interview last
night, "which the student acquires
only after he has been at the univer-
sity for some length of time. Before
this he'is influenced by what others;
have told him, or by what he has;
read of college life. Had someone
given him the right point of view at
the very outset of his career, number-t
less mistakes might have been avoid-
ed, and futile experiments obviated. It
is my purpose to dissipate some of thes
bogies which lurk in the mind of thet
average freshman."
The assembly for literary freshmen
is a new thing, and its success dependst
ipon the way in which it is receivedt
by the majority of first year students.
A large attendance is urged by those
in charge of the affair and a real treat
is promised in the shape of an address
by one of the best known, and best7
liked members of the faculty.z
FRENCH STOP U. S. STEAMER
Cruiser Halts Vessel; Remove Two
Second-Class Passengers
New York, Dec. 11.-The steamship
San Juan, of the New York and Porto°
Rico line, flying the American flag,
was held up and searched by a French
-cruiser while the steamer was bound1
°rom New Orleans to San Juan, Portot
Rico, according to a message receivedt
by the line today. Two second-class
passengers were removed. The San
Iuan is the third vessel of this line
to have been held up within the past
qve days, the Coamo and Carolinat
having been searched, off Porto Rico,;
his week. The passengers removed
rom the San Juan were William
Dunthecodt and Sritsce Lothar, both£
paid to be residents of New Orleans.
The San Juan left New Orleans Sat-l
urday and arrived at San Juan early
today. .
Paris, Dec. 11.-An explosion de-3
stroyed the munition factory of the
Belgian government at Havre today.

'CREEKS T
BATTLE1 TEUIUNS
KING ON STANTiN'7;"b C Aii ET P
.11Y TDEFIA A 01 iirR 1,101
E 'IIR BAIT
ANL8O-FRENCH RELATE PIANS
Coiferehce a ariS Je teu to
peter Eitieute Hold in
Balkans
Rome, Dcc. 11.---Repors are cr-
sistently cCming in tait the dfCa V
battle of the retreat in southern Serbia
is about to be tought between thle
combined forces of Bulgaria and
Glermany, and the Anglo-French troops
which have now been partly driven
back behind the Cresiai bord r line.
Germans are said to ha' e b.n a.;,hrt-
ed on recia: isoi this mornin, i
the execution. of their moe-ster n-
circling movement. C roce is on e
verge of declarinu war.
Dispatches from Athens and Saloe-
iki assert that the Germans have
launched their mighty effort to dri ve
all the entente soldiers back upon
Saloniki.
Greek official circles state that King
Constantine and his government are
on the brink of declaring war, and
are fully expecting to do so within
several days. The chief hesitancy
seems to be whether the cabinet will
throw in the fate of Greece with the
central powers or Cn the entente side.
It is also possible that King Constan-
tine when forced into fighting, will
fight against both invaders separately
in an effort to oust them from his soil.
English and Fhench Confzr
London, Dec. 11.-The French and
British governments decided at the
conclusion today #of a twc--Gays' con-
ference at Paris upon the action to
be taken in the Balkans. The' en-
tente powers decided to withdraw
from the Serbian frontier, the forces
now engaged with the Bulgarians.
These forces are to retire iato winter
quarters to be establjished at Saoniki
and elsewhere, in pursuance with the
understanding with Greece. At the
samve time the decision was reached
according to a sem -oficial announce-
ment made in Paris after the close of
the cenferenee to ccetius the car-
paign in the Balkans and to take steps
at once to send sufficient troops to
Saloniki to insure the safety of the
expeditionary orce fpg;ti;, there.
The proposed offense will not be be-
gun until spring. The conference dis-
cussed the operations in the west and
on other fronts as well as the situa-
tion in the Balkans, and it may be
assumed that the Balkan orene wi:
be part of a general achenn. of cam-
paign to be inaugurated inall th
'heatres of war. The decision cf the
entente regarding the retention of tne
base at Saloniki for further operations
in the Balkans seems to have bee1
reached on their receipt of news fror
Athens that the Greek government
has acceded to the demands of the
allies in the matter of the positions
of the expeditionary forces o Greek
territory. The partial mobiliza Von of
the Greek army at Saloniki and other
questions at issue between Greece and
the allies were considered.

' lV 'ill Siieak at the nimon This
Afternoon.
, s
-oi'mier Baseball Captain, iNow Promi-
nejt in Politics, to T'1k at
,:0OClock Today
TO LECTURE ON CITIZENSIHP
"Ed" Shie lds, '94-'96L, will speak at
the Union this afternoon at 3:00 o'clock
on "A Standard of Citizenship." It
will be remembered that Shields was
one of the speakers that put the won-
derful spirit into the M. A. C. come-
back mass meeting last month.
Mr. Shields received the degree of
bachelor of arty in 1894 and in 1896
graduated from the law school
During his life in Ann Arbor he was
prominent in student activities, hav-
ing been captain of the baseball team
in 1915. He has always been an active
alumnus, and was one of the founders
of the "M" club, Mr. Shields is also
one of Michigan's eminent lawyers and
is prominent in the Democratic party
of this state.
TiOKET SELLERS APPOINTED
('onemey Club Names Committee of a
to handle Work
F ifteen sub-chairmen of the ticket-
2.1mg committee of the Comedy club
hc;e been appointed by General Chair-
cn_ William K. Niemann. These men
ill have charge of the distribution of
tickets for the next Comedy club play,
"The Professor's Love Story," which
will be given at the Whitney theatre
next Satnrday evening.
The following is a list of the men
~appointed:
Don Wilson, '18, Philip Wilson, '18E,
Ezra Lockwood, '18, H. L. Goodspeed,.
'18E, Stephen Pratt, '18E, C. E. Gorm-
sea, '18F, R. C. Gernanson, '18E, A.
V. Livingston, '28E, H. A. Knowlson,
' 8E, , T. Mosier, '18, Claire F.
Lymar, '19, H. Howe, '18, C. K. Patter-
son, 7, G. E. Dake, '18E, U. S. G.
Cherry, '18.
h eysteite C'hi to Engage Special Car
Members of the Keystone club ex-
pect to have a special car for all
Pennsylvania men. The car will leave
Ann Arbor at 7:30 o'clock on the even-
ing of December 21. Those interest-
ed should call T. C. Hill, 990-J.

A nnArries
It was made public yesterday that
"Jack" Benton, ex-'16, member of the
Varsity football and baseball teams,
was married to Miss Eleanor Coburn
Reed, of Ann Arbor, last Monday ev-
euing. The ceremony was perfo .
at the home of the bride's mother.
The couple have gone to Valparaiso,
Ind., for their honeymoon, and will
probably make their home in .Gary,
Ind., where the groom will assist his
father, who is dean of the commercial
department of Valparaiso university.
IEconomist and Autlinr Talks on "The
Ecintoinic Problem and Spir-
it oail Im p icatirr'
y ri. 1 E ON PROGRAM
John Spargo, of Chicago, economist
and author, will speak on, "The Eco-
nomic Problem and Its Spiritual Im-
plication," at the "Y" meeting in U-
ball this evening at 6:30 o'clock.
The speaker has visited Ann Arbor
before and he is recognized as an elo-
qunent and effective lecturer. He has
a wealth of knowledge upon the inter-
eational socialist and social movement
questions.
Mr. Spargo has been active in inter-
preting to educated men and women
'he ideals and achievements of the So-
cialist party. Besides delivering ad-
'resses in all parts of the country, he
has written many mooks on Socialism.
zesides se eral vocal solos, the mu-
sical program 'will include selections
by a trio, G. D. Jones, '16, violin;
Claire F. Lyman, '19, piano, and W. B.
Moore, 'I8E, cello. n
liinrs Aloi e Will be Prohibited From
Using Weed"
At a meting of the board of direct-
mrs of the Michigan Union last Wed-
n esday it was decided that minors
would not be allowed to smoke in the
clubhouse althiough, of course, other
members will be allowed to do so as
heretofore.
The law prohibiting the sale of cig-
arettes to minors will be strictly en-
forced at the Union desk and minors
are requested not to try to evade the
cigarette law.
imiau Electeda Harvard Captain
Joseph A. Oilman, of Honolulu, was
elected captain of the 1916 Harvard
football team at a meeting held yes-
terday of the eligible members of this
year's eleven.

TE~MPQRARY SUCCESSOR TO DR.
1W HBA TO BE DISMISSED
FOR FORGERY
IHARP ANCONA__,NOTE GIVEN
Text of Official American Missive
Said to Be Unusually
Emphatic
Washington, Dec. 11.-It became
known today that Baron Zwiedlmek,
temporary successor to former Aus-
trian ambassador, Dr. Dumba, stands
in peril of following his successor
home within a short time. This in-
formation was given out today, simul-
.,aneeusly with the announcement that
Ambassador Penield had Just deliver-
ed the rather sharply worded note on
the Ancona affair to the Austrian head-
quarters.
The full text of the American note
will be published Monday morning.
Rumors have escaped from official
circles that the. wording of the Amer-
ican note is unusually emphatic.
Federal officers have been s'ifting
evidence which has fairly poured into
rat government offices during the past
tour days to such an extent that Baron
Zwiedimek appears in an extremely
bad light. Several photographs are
now in the government's possession
which show letters with the ambas-
sador's signature written below state-
ments which prove the alleged for-
iery and wholesome misuse of the
\merican passports for Germans and
ustrians in the opening month of the
war.
The letters are addressed from Man-
chester, Mass., in August of 1914, to
"he consul-general at New York, In
these letters details were given of
forgery and misuse of the United
tates passports.
Even some of the most conserva-
e men in the state department ad-
mit that complete severance of diplo-
matic connections between Austria
and the United States may occur
shortly.
Naval Attaches to Have Safe Conduct
Washington, Dec. 11.-Requests are
heing sent out today by Secretary of
State Lansing both to the British and
the French governments, for the safe
transportation of the two Germ an
naval attaches Captains Boy-Ed and
von Papen, recently expelled from the
United States. This is in pursuance of
Kaiser Wilhelm's request that the two
officers return to Berlin.

r

WHT' GO 'N

ADDRESSES MENORAH TODAY I OR. ADAMS CERCLE SPEAKER

Prof. Edward C. Baldwin of Univer-
sity of Illinois, Speaks Tonight
Prof. Edward C. Baldwin, of the
University of Illinois, will speak on
"Job" at an open meeting of the
Menorah society in Newberry hall this
evening at 8:00 o'clock.
The speaker is an honorary member
of the Illinois Menorah society and
has been an activeworker in the or-
ganization.
Professor Baldwin's latest book,
"Our Debt to Israel," has placed him
among the foremost authors on Jew-
ish literature, ideals and culture.

;Literature of South France" Sub-
jeet of Talk on Tuesday.
Dr. Edward L. Adams of the engin-
eering college will deliver the second
lecture of the Cercle Francais series
next Tuesday afternoon at 5:00 o'clock
in the lecture room of Tappan hall.
The subject of the lecture will be
"The Literature of the South of
France." Dr. Adams will speak in
English because the literature which
he will discuss is written in the Pro-
vencal tongue.
All of the rest of the lectures will
be delivered in French.

STATE AND WASHiNGTON STREETS
ARTHUR W. STALKER, D. D., Minister
Morniog Subject: " Shame and Christianity, Today."
Evening: Miss Gertrude MacWhirk, Dramatic Reader.
Quactdtte. Ada Grace Johnson, Alice l3liton,
Odra Patton, Stanley Wilson.

TODAY w
Prof. E. C. Baldwin speaks to Menorah1
society, Newberry hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Dr. Joseph W. Cochran, Presbyterian
church, 7:30 o'clock.
Edmund C. Shields speaks, Union, 3:00
o'clock.
John Spargo speaks, "Y", U-hall, 6:30
o'clock.
TOMORROW
Mischa Elman, Hill auditorium, 8:00
o'clock.
Prof. J. R. Brumm speaks to fresh lit
assembly, Science building ^ audi-
torium, 4:00 o'clock.
Poetry club meets, 203 Tappan hall,
4:00 o'clock.
Cercle Francais meets, Cercle rooms,
18:30 o'clock.
Combined Social Service organization
meets, Methodist church, 7:00
o'clock.

Kentucky Club to Have Private Coach
Kentucky club authorities have com-
pleted arrangements for their usual
private car for the southerp journey
before the holidays.
The car will leave Ann Arbor Tues-
day, December 21, and will go straight
to Louisville. Low rates have been
secured and the privilege of the car
car will not' be restricted to members
of the club, as anyone will be allowed
to make the trip.
Reservations cari be secured by
'phoning J. Powell, 371, or Frank
Thompson, 18.
Manager W. F. Newton of the J-
Lit basketball team, requests those
interested to call 236.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
' Ad. W. Biter says:- *
* There are but -:- -:- -:- *
**
* *
* more shopping days before you *
* leavre fory our Christmas vc - *

*
*:
*:

tion.
Mr. Student, are you heeding
the holiday ads? -
Mr Merchant, are you adver-
tising?
* * * * * * * * * * *

. .. ;.

Do

Your

i
r
r
VZY

Love 0

Thme Comedy Chzb 'Play will Tell Youz

hitney

t
s:;-
;
r,'

, " ~i
r Y
r
j,

18

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan