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December 07, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DAILY
$2.00
NEW OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

fie,

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Phones:-EditoriU 2414
TELEGRAPH SEERVICE BY 'fIE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI No. 55.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

______

CoMMITTEEWHICH
WIL 1UDGE OPERA
wilJR ,OMUSIC SELECTED
PROFESSOR STANLEY, MESSRS.
HARRISON AND MOORE
ARE NAMED
POSTER CONTESTANTS TO MEET
Cast Tryouts Will be Held at Early
Date; Prospects Asked to
Be Ready
Music for the 1916 Michigan Union
Opera will be judged by a committee
of three composed of Prof. A. A. Stan-
ley, Messrs. Theodore Harrison and
Earl Moore, of the School of Music.
This selection was made at a meet-
ing of the committee held yesterday.
As mentioned at an earlier date, the
f music for the show must be in the
hands of Theron D. Weaver, '16E, gen-.
eral chairman of this year's opera, by
Monday, December 13. Those who are
unable to write their music will have
an opportunity to play their composi-
tions before the committee.
it is also expected that unusual com-
petition will be shown in the contest'
for the opera poster, which will like-
wise be the design for the opera score.
Chairman Weaver requests that those
who are interested be present at a
meeting to be held at the Union at
7:00 o'clock Thursday evening. As
has been customary in previous years
a prize will be offered for the poster
selected from those contributed. The
amount of the prize will be specified.
at a later date.
Work on the opera has been pro-
gressing and the management hopes
to have a tryout for cast parts at an
early date. Those who took part in
the opera last year, as well as others
who intend to try out, are urged to
make some preparation for the tryout
so that the committee may be better
able to judge the ability of those try-
ing out.
ACCUSE SEERAL MORE
IN SHIP CONSPIRAY ASES
David Lamar, "Wolf of Wall Street,"
Suspected of Complicity liu
Rincelef Plot
New York, Dec. 6.-David Lamar,
"The Wolf of Wall Street," was named
today by United States District Attor-
ney Marshall as an aid of Franz Rince-
lef, lieutenant captain of the German
army, in the plan to prevent shiment
of munitions to the Allies.
Lamar is accused as being cashier
for Rincelef in financing the labor na-
tional peace council, one of whose
aims was to seek an embargo on the
export of arms and munitions.
That charge was made clear by Mr.
Marshall. Mr. Marshall's statement
is important because of what it dis-
(Continued on Page Six)
RUTH LENINER WRITES PLAT

_.

,_

DEANEFFINGER ADDRESSES FDRUm TO DISCUSS
SUNDAY UNION MEETING THF "flAillY" TYll

THOID FEVER CLAIMS
Vl LL, ES A.SAuER

"Drift and Mastery," Forms Subject
of Interesting Talk Before
Union Members
Taking his subject, "Drift and Mas-
tery, from the title of a recently pub-
lished book, Dean J. R. Effinger gave
one of the most interesting talks of
the year before members of the Mich-
igan Union Sunday afternoon.
The dean contrasted the condition
of affairs in regard to the manage-
ment of campus enterprises in 1836
with that of the present day, seeking
to show that the various activities
from being controlled by a favored
few, had come to be participated in
by all. Honesty in business affairs,
f
in athletics, and in all forms of acad-
emic endeavor was a topic on which
the dean dwelt upon at some length.
The early struggles for supremacy
between the fraterity and the non-..
fraternity men, and the bitter enmity
which had long existed between theni
was cited to show the work which
had been done toward the reconcilia-
tion of these factions.
Student self government, the dean
intimated, was one of the best of all
university institutions, were it but
given the proper support. Too many
men sought the office of student coun-
cilman for the honor of the office
alone, perhaps knowing little, and
caring less as to the duties thereby
imposed upon them. Time had been,
said the speaker, when the student
council and all its actions were ridi-
culed by nearly everyone, but the old,
order of things was gradually chang-
ing.
A plea for the faculty man was
made. Dean Effinger tried to show
that the faculty and the student had
many things in common, that there
was no one more friendly to the in-
terests of the student, nor more gen-
uinely human than the man behind the
desk. "The men of the faculty are not
opposing your various projects from
innate hostility toward you," he said.
"They are merely adopting a fatherly
attitude in matters in which their
wider experience should of right tri-
umph over the impetuosity of youth.
You would not call your fathers 'old
fools' or 'old fogies' should they op-
pose you in these same matters."
A well chosen quartet selection
closed the meeting.'
LENGTHY SESSION FOR
CONGRESS IS PREICTI1ON;
Legislators Start Out on Important
Work, Displaying Fine
Spirit
Washington, Dec. 6.-The sixty-
'ourth Congress got under way at7
noon today and before it was hardly1
an hour old, predictions were beingI
heard on all sides that the sessionI
would extend well into next summerc
and possibly into the fall.,
Champ Clark, in accepting his re-{
election as speaker, threw out thei
suggestion that the time was rapidlyt
approaching when, on account of the
necessary increase in legislation, thet
session of Congress would be length-t
ened.
Regardless of this foreboding the
legislators started on their work in
fine spirit.
The Democrats, though greatly re-
duced in numbers in the House, seem-
ed well satisfied with the world and
hopeful of success under the Wilson
leadership.
The Republicans on the other hand
with membership in the House in-2

-reased from 121 to 197, were in joy-
ful mood ready for the legislative fray;
which they believe is to culminate in
a Republican Congress and a Republi-
can president in 1916.1

Second iscussion Will Consider The
Micligan Daily's Success as
Official Publieation
GATHERING TO LAST ONE HOUR

S 'i 'hei f.i~Ab

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Forum Meeting

Mayor Charles A. Sauer passed
away yesterday morning at 3:30
o'clock, at St. Joseph's sanitarium.
where he had been confined with ty-
phoid fever for the last three weeks.
ie bad .aci in filing healtb for some
time, and was taken sick on November
13, with the disease which resulted in
his death.
Came to Ann Arbor in 1886
Mr. Sauer assumed the office of
mayor nearly six months ago, and up

HARRISON WILL DIRECT
GLEE CLUBIN CONTEST
Tutor Has Had Much Experience With
Choral Societies; Pleased
With Results
With the assurance that Theodore
Harrison, the director of the Glee club,
will personally direct from the stage
every number presented by that club
in the Novelty concert Friday evening
in Hill auditorium, the success of its
part of the concert is 'certain.
Mr. Harrison's experience in choral
work is noteworthy. He was for sev-
eral seasons a member of the Orpheus
club in Philadelphia. During that
time the club was conducted by Fritz

Subject--Michigan Daily.
Time--d:30.
Place --Michigan Union.
ha irrman-George Caron,

'17L.*

to that time he had never held any
Harry 1). Parker, '16L, announced political office of any kind. He was
last nightthat George C. Caron, '17L, born at Stratford, Conn., December 18,
will be the chairman of the Union 1866. When he was five years of age
Forun meoting which is to be held to- his parents moved to Saline, Michi-
night at 7:30 o'clock. The topic un- gan, where he resided until he was 20
der discussion will be, "Is The Mich- years old. He came to this city in
igan Daily Performing Its Function as 1886, where he engaged in the con-
the Official Student Publication of the tracting business. All of his energy
University ?"had been devoted to building up this
This year The Daily has changed i=5 business, and it has expanded until
policy to that of a metropolitan news- he was considered one of the foremost
paper and at the Forum tonight will men of the state in that line. He also
be ascertained whether this change is owned a lumber yard and planing mill
satisfactory to the student body as a in this city, and had similar interests
whole. As these meetings are of the in Detroit, which he acquired about
greatest importance in bringing the three and a half years ago.
campus together in closer union, and He is survived by his wife and four
as many reforms are carried out be- children: Nola, Laura, Karl, and
cause of them, everyone able to do so Waldo. His parents, Mr. and Mrs.
should attend. Adam Sauer, still live at Saline; two
The interest shown at the last sisters, Miss Barbara. Sauer of ,this
meeting was great. The subject dis- city, and Mrs. Katherine Vandamark
cussed was military training and the of Clinton, and two brothers, Adam
subject discussed gave great impetus an'd John A. Sauer, also live in this
to the discussion on the campus in re- city.
gard to the question. Prominent in' Lodges
He 'was a priominent member of the
Elks lodge and Knights of Pythias in
this city, the Fellowcraft club of De-
troit, amr the Sledge club of Toledo.
The body will ha in state from 12:00 to
3:O'RA.TN Hm .today at the family home
and thfuneralwill take place from
there _t :00 o'clock Wednesday af-
List to le Held Open for Those Who ternoon. The services will be con-
.Ard . ducted by the Rev. Cqurtland Miller,
Ila e N Already gnd; and the remains will be placed in the
Total Now 41 mausolein Bethleh em cemetery.
--- The l. earers will be Ross
D0E11;1 i1ONMC11 T11 lf1VEi AlP Granger' Titus Hutzel, Andrew Reule,
___ Samuel Heuse., John Feiner, and
Students of engineering who have Michael Fritz.

'III- 1h 171:4 ii i95QN
il~lof'the Vocal Ies~in
the School of Iluosic.

of

Scheel, Frank Damrosch, Horatio W.
Parker, and Arthur D. Woodruff. Mr.
Harrison also sang in the - Junger
Maennerchor, directed by Louis Koe-
nemenich, who is now conductor of
the New York Oratorio society.
Among other choruses which Mr.
Harrison sang in while in Germany,
the following are the most notewor-
thy: Lehrer Gesang Verein, at Mu-
nish; Bach Verein, at Heidelberg;
Sing Akademie, at Jena, and the
Strassburger Maennerchor, at Strass-
burg.
The rehearsal of the club last night
fully proved the worth of its director.
Every number was well-rendered and
the men are ready to stage their part
of the concert. Mr. Harrison declared,
"The club sings as well as any club I
ever listened to. I am surprised that
.he men should do so well."
Rehearsals will be held Wednesday
and Thursday evenings in Hill audi-
torium, and much may be expected
when the club makes its initial ap-
pearance on Friday night with Mr.
Harrison wielding the baton.
Pennsylvania Club Meets Today
The Pennsylvania cu will hold a
short business meeting at the Michi-
gan Union today at 4:15 o'clock.
The question of the advisability of
having a special car to Pittsburg will
be discussed along with other im-
portant matters. All students from
Pennsylvania are urged to be pres-
ent.
Plans are now being made for the
Mall between the Natural Science and
Chemistry buildings.

CER AN SOLDIER
SENT TO FRONTIER
AROUNDRUSTCHUK
COMPLETE ARMY DIVISION OR.
DERED TO MEET ROUMANIAN
CONCENTRATION
BRITISH SINK TURK DESTROYER
Germans Bombard Russian Trenches
in Dvinsk Region; Move
Back on Oise
Athens, Dec. 6.-The 105th German
division has been rushed to Rustchuk
presumably to meet the Roumanian
concentration near that point and to
repel the movement of Russian troops.
The Greek military authorities re-
ceived word today that Germany was
sending heavy artillery from the west-
ern front to Roumanian quarters.
China Friendly to England
New York, Dec. 6.-The Munshe, a
Chinese weekly, has received a cable
from Shanghai dated December 4, say-
ing that the president of China has
made a secret proposition to England
asking for recognition of the moin-
archy and promise of the friendship
of China and of her assistance in re-
turn for the favor.
U-Boat Active
London, Dec. 6.-The Turkish tor-
pedo destroyed Arkissar, has been
sunk in the Sea of Marmora by a
British submarine, it was announced
in a British official statement this af-
ternoon. A supply steamer and four
sailing vessels were also destroyed by
the submarine on December 3 and 4.
Little Damage Done
Petrograd, Dec. 6.-Heavy bombard-
ment of Russian trenches by German
artillery in the Dvinsk region is re-
ported in an official statement. Little
damage was done.. The German at-
tack on. Rafalewha and Styr was
halted.
British Shell Teutons
Paris, Dec. 6-German troops moved
back somewhat on the northern front
today and on the Oise were shelled
violently by British artillery. Belgian
cannon shelled troops of German in-
fantry near Schoorbach.
Italian General Dead a
Rome, Dec. 6.-General Promi has
fallen in the fierce fighting before
Gorizia. His death is announced in an
official bulletin.
SWEEPING INQUIRY DIRECTED
TOWARD DEFENSE SOCIETIES
Representatihe Gardner of 'Massa-
chusetts Has Plan for Getting
at Truth.
.Washington, De'c. 6.-A sweeping
inquiry into the activities of the va-
rious defense organizations that have
been formed is proposed in a resolu-
tion offered in the house by Repre-
sentative Gardner of Massachusetts.
Mr. Gardner announced that he had
grown weary hearing that the defense
societies were backed by interested
munition makers and he intends to
give the Democratic house a chance
to get at the truth.
His resolution authorizes an ap-
pointment of a committee of five mem-
bers to inquire into the membership,
finances and activities of the Navy
league, Labor Peace council, the Na-
tion Security league and the Ameri-
tional Security league and the Ameri-

interested themselves in the forma-
tion of a student branch of the Soci-
ety of !automobile Engineers at Michi-
gan will meet tonight at 7:00 o'clock
sharp in the engineering society
rooms to discess final plans for the
formation of the society.
The list which is headed "I pledge
my active interest and support to a
student branch of the S. A. E. pro-
viding it is formed" was signed by the
26 men who were present at the last
meeting. Since that time the total
has risen to 41.
Since the last meeting, President
Brush, of the Brush Engineering cor-
poration, and chairman of the mem-
bership committee of the Detroit
branch of the S. A. E., has been in
communication with Prof. Filshleigh,
head of the automobile engineering
department and has made known the
interest which the Detroit branch is
taking in the movement in no un-
certain way. He has extended ti
those interested in the formation ox'
the student branch, such as may be
named by Prof. Fishleigh, an invita-
(Continued on Page Six)
Pennsy Suffers Front Strange Anomaly
Pennsylvania, unanie to land a suc-
cessful football coach for itself, had
more head coaches throughout the
country this past fall than any other
college, having 16 of its former stars
at the helm in different schools. Dart-
mouth is second with 15; Yale third,
with 14; and Michigan fourth, with 10.
The other leaders are: Princeton, 9;
Chicago, 9; Wisconsin, 8; Lafayette,
6; Colgate, 5; Harvard, 3; Illinois, 3;
Amherst, 3; Cornell, 2; Williams 2.

WORTHI FILES SUIT FOR
SIBE RSANST-NLICE
Alleges That He Was Assaulted by
Police and Held in Jail For
Two Hours
Alleging that he had been assaulted
and otherwise mistreated by certain
iembers of the city police force, Clar-
ence 'Worth, '15E, of Detroit, yesterday
flied.suit for $10,000 damages in the
circ-nit eturt thronch his attorney, N.
A. Cobb, of Battle Creek..he defend-
ants in the case as mentioned in the
filing aire: Chief of Police Frank Par-
don, Patrolmen William Blackburn,
Frank Kiel, Emanuel Stodt and Depu-
ty S.merLffs William H. Esslinger and
William. Eldert.
It will be remembered that Worth
was arrested in the so-called Majestic
riot a few weeks ago and later was ac-
qutted of the charge of disturbing the
pnace by a jury in the justice court of
William G. Doty.
In his complaint Worth alleges that
he was not only assaulted by the de-
fendants, but was forced to spend two
hours in the city jail and also expend
$100 in his own defense. For injuries'
as named in addition to the loss of his
good name, he asks for damages of
$10,000.
Minneapolis, TvIinn., Dec. G.-The
athletic eldsat the University of
:Minnesota is to be flooded for skating.

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

Committee

Has Difficulty iin Choosing
Successful Play

Ruth H. Lenzner, '17, is the author
of the Junior play which will be given
on Wednesday, March 28, in Sarah
Caswell Angell Hall by the juniors
in honor of the seniors.
The committee consisting of Dean
Jordan, Dr. Mallory, and Albertine
Loomis, '17, had difficulty in choosing
the successful play. Eight others were
submitted, all of which had excellent
plots, but their staging would have
been too elaborate. At least one of
these will probably be put on by
Masques or the Comedy club during
the year-

TODAY.
Union Forum, Michigan Union, 7:30
o'clock.
Pennsylvania club meeting, Union,
4:15 o'clock;
Comedy club meets, Union, 4:15
o'clock.
Football squad dinner, Union, 6:00
o'clock.
Fresh Engineer smoker, Union, 7:30
o'clock.
Sphinx dance, Packard academy, 9:00

o'clock.
Senior Dent dance,' Granger's acad-
emy, 9:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Senior Architects meet, room 312 of
new Eng. building, 5:00 o'clock.
Illinois club smoker, Michigan Union,
9:00 o'clock.

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Ad. W. Miter says:-
There are but twelve more
shopping days before you leave
for your Christmas vacation.
Mr. Student, are you heeding *
the holiday ads *
Mr. Merchant, are you adver- *
tising?
* * * * * * * * * *, * *

_ _

r

I

START

PL ANINMi

'7
, ,

The Time
is Friday
at +8:00 p.m.

THE PRICE IS JUST TWE T

W FORTE
Y-FIVE CENTS

The Place

:IU

is Hill

A ditorium

U

a

I

gains=

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