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October 09, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

D

e

Michigan

Da

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9 1915.

SES MICHIGAN UNIONBEGINS
ERS PLANS IN PREPARATION
mT FOR FOOTBALL SMOKER

PHILLIES DEFEAT BOSTON IN FIRST.
ALEXANDER ALLOWS SOX{IlGHT IlTS

-s

CHIEF EXECUTIVE LAYS
ASIDE' ALL AREWHEN
IN COMPAN OF FIACE

111

I#

I'

-UPI

Important Part of Program Will be
Presentation of Sweaters to
Regulars and Scrubs
MAIN FLOOR OF WATERMAN GYM
MADE INTO AMPHITHEATRE
FULL LIST OF COMMITTEEMEN
WILL BE ANNOUNCED
SHORTLY

(By the New York Sun Service.)
Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 8.-Ability,
to hit in the pinches, the showing by
Grover Cleveland Alexander of brainy
pitching without extending himself,
and fielding which bordered on the
sensational, enabled the Phillies,
champions of the National league, to
take the first game of the world's se-
ries title from Boston, the American
league's representative.
It was a lack of these qualities for
the most part which spelled defeat for

Carrigan's men. They could not pro-
duce hits when most sorely needed,
taking little advantage of their many"
opportunities. Shore, who opposed
the men of Moran, blew iii the eighth
inning and alowed two runs to score.
Up to this time he had more than held
his own with the master, Alexander.
The game might not have been de-
cided in the eighth had not Scott,
shortstop of the Boston outfit, pulled
the "boner" which seems to character-
(Continued on Page Three)

L. E
L. T
L. C
C.
R. E
R. T

*
E. ..Stambaugh *
.Yost *
*
G Wahl *
...Thorpe *
...McLean*
....Marlowe .
.......M iller
3. ......Geltz
S.....Wilson
I. .....Hegarty *
3. ...... Lovell *
nyder, of Har- *
Kennedy, of ,
*
-Leigh Lynch,
*
2:30 o'clock.*
* * * * * *

with a
nt from
a week

Several big tobacco concerns have
been interviewed and have promised
large supplies of "fuel" for the annual
football smoker, booked for a day or
two after the final fall football battle.
Paul Thompson, '16L, is in complete
charge of the affair, which Is staged
under the direction of the Michigan
Union, and for the past week he has
been laying preliminary preparations
for the event. The main feature of
the program will be the presentation
of the "Ms" to the Varsity regulars
and the "Rs" to the reserves, a cus-
tom originated at the smoker two
years ago.
Bleachers will transform into an
amphitheatre the main floor of Water-
man gym, provided nothing interferes
with holding the event in that cus-
tomary place. Between 2,000 and
2,500 men will be accommodated.
Negotiations are now pending for se'
curing speakers of the caliber of
Judge Thompson, of New York state.
Coaches, the ex-captain, and captain-
elect of the gridiron squad, men
prominent on the campus and popular
professors will be called upon for
"pep" talks. The full program, to-
gether with the large number of com-
mitteemen needed to carry the pro-
ject through, will be published within
a week or 10 days.
UPHOLD MICINS HONR
REPRESENTATIVE STUDENTS ASK
UNDERCLASSMEN TO PRESERVE
PRESTIGE OF UNIVERSITY
'o the Student Body:'
Michigan has recently figured prom-
inently in the editorial, columns of
some 300 papers and magazines. The
university is. still being closely
atched, and for this reson it would
be especially harmful to have reports
of underclass rowdyism in Ann Arbor
circulated throughout the country.
Events of the last two nights show
a tendency toward this state of af-
fairs, and in an effort to head off
tioble an appeal is being made to
all undergraduates to put reason
above rowdyism. A single riot will
do more to 'injure Michigan's prestige
at this time than could be repaired
in another decade.
HARRY G.* GAULT, '15-'17L.
HAROLD SMITH, '16.
. WERNER SCHROEDER, '14-'16L.
FRANCIS F. McKINNEY, 16L.
(Continued on Page. Six)
,men will receive thorough trials at
the job.
The coach stated that it was his
intention to use all of his quarter-
backs this afternoon against Mt.
Union. This will almost mean a
steady procession of pilots on and off
the field, as he has seven that are
available. "Rummy" Roehm will
head the list, and he will be followed
by Zeiger, Bixler, Sharpe, Catlett, Cal-
vin and Johnson, before the game is
over. In just what order these gen-
tlemen will make their appearance is

OPEN HOUSE AT UNION
DRAWS RECORD THRONG
More Than 1,500 Students Gather at
First Big Social Event
of Year
Open House at the Union last night
proved a success when over 1,500
packed the Union hall and stacked
away 504 gallons of 'apple juice. Ed-
ward J. Crumpacker, '16E, chairman
of the Union program committee, was
toastmaster at the get-together gath-
ering. He first introduced Leroy Scan-
lon, '16L, who, with the help of the
piano, put the party in the highest of
spirits. #
When the freshmen, who had just
arrived from their meeting at Hill
auditorium, had removed their hats,
Chase Sikes, '16, led everyone in some
of the good old songs. After snappy
selections by "Ike" Fisher's orchestra,
Prof. J hn R. Allen, of the mechanical
engineering department, spoke "espe-
cially to the, freshmen." He told them
that one thing i:* particular to re-
member was that no man was ever
educated in college.
W. A. P. John, '16, editor of the
Gargoyle, was the next entertainer.
After bringing forth 89 laughs he
spoke seriously to the first year men,
concluding: "I know ,you will be
proud of Michigan, because there isn't
a thing in the world of which man can
be more proud."
The final speaker was Prof. Robert
Buhker of the Law school. He first
welcomed the newcomers "to Michi-
gan's past for the heritage it offers,
to her present for the opportunity it
affords, and to her future for its hope
and promise. You freshmen are the
beneficiaries of a rich heritage at
Michigan, and I beg of you to do all
in your power for her honor."
Dean D. Butts, '19, the "Dark Horse
Wonder" from the University of Chi-
cago, climaxed the program with an
unusual performance at the piano.
AUTOMOBILE LABORATORY TO
BE PREPARED FOR ENGINEERS
Display Cases Will be Constructed on
Which Parts of machines
Will be Shown
Faculty and students interested in
the automobile courses. given in the
engineering college have been grant-
ed the use of the old university boiler
and power house near the engineering
building for an automobile laboratory.
The front portion of the building will
be used for offices and the rear space
for testing rooms. When the plans
of the department are carried out, it
is expected that the engineering col-
lege will have one of the best college
laboratories in the country for auto-
mobile research.
The construction of the building is
such that it will lend itself easily to
adaptation for the laboratory pur-
poses. The old gallery running
around the large boiler room will
have an outside entrance on the south
side of the building and will be open

.. {

NNUALI CONVOCATION
TO COME ON OCT.
IN ILL AUITOIUM
Dean M. E. Cooley and President
Hutchins Speakers at Annual
Gathering
WILL DISMISS ALL CLASSES IN
UNIVERSITY AT 1:00 O'CLOCK
VARSITY BAND TO LEAD PROCES-
SION OF FACULTY AND STU-
DENTS AROUND CAMPUS
Convocation Day has been officially
set for Friday, October 15, according
to Prof. L. M. Gram, of the College
of Engineering, who has been desig-
nated by President Harry B. Hutchins
to have charge of the arrangements
for the affair.
Dean M. E. Cooley has been secured
'for the principal speaker on .the oc-
casion, while President Hutchins will
give a short address to the student
body. Several musical numbers are
being arranged for the festivities, un-
der the direction of Prof. A. A. Stan-
ley, of the school of music.
As customary, all classes in the
university will be dismissed at 3:00
o'clock, and immediately afterward
the various classes will assemble at
places on the campus to be designated
later by the arrangements committee.
Members of the faculties will also
meet at an appointed place, 'and,
headed by the Varsity band, will lead
the procession around the campus
before entering Hill. Auditorium.
Prof. H. C. Sadler, of the College of
Engineering, has been appointed to
make the necessary arrangements for
the faculty.
The program in Hill auditorium is
scheduled to start at 3:30 o'clock.
Student Volunteers Convene Tonight
Student Volunteers, Michigan stu-
dents who intend to take up some form
of missionary work in foreign coun-
tries, will convene for. their first
meeting of the year in Newberry hall
at 7:30 o'clock this evening. The
meeting will be in charge of Presi-
dent William McCandliss, Medic '18,
and several important policies for the
year's work will come up for consid-
erations.
to visitors. Cases will be built to
hold displays of, carburetors, mag-
netos, differentials and assembled mo-
tors, as well as drawings and speci-
fications of the various parts. All
kinds of automobile research will be
carried on in the building.
Superintendent J. H. Marks now
has his men at work removing former
fixtures from the building and pre-
paring for the alterations.

Rejuvenated Woodrow Wilson Ap-
pears in New York for First Time
With Mrs. Galt AL
PRESIDENT TO ATTEND DINNER
BEFORE RETURNING TO CAPITAL PRON
NATION'S HEAD SEEMS TO HAVE
BEEN RELIEVED OF CARES Vot
OF PAST YEAR A
(By the New York Sun Service.)
New York, Oct. 8.-It was a new (By
Woodrow Wilson who made his ap- Ber
pearance in New 'York today as he Zeitur
stepped along jauntily and politely Bulga
with the future first lady of the land, manif
Mrs. Norman Galt, whom he will mar- nounc
ry early in Deeember. The lines of on th
care which have been es)ecially Amo
prominent on the president's face dur- decisi
ing the stirring events of the past have
year seem to have been totally erased Bulga
by happiness. 'lied na
All cares of state, the Mexican sit- garia
uation and the war were forgotten. ian-Au
The lady was all smiles, and in ad- desire
dition to the president she was ac- Ano
companied by her mothey. garia
The party will be the guests of Col- of the
onel E. M. House at a dinner tonight, that I
after which the guests will be enter- standi
tained at a theater party.. The presi- her fa
dent will probably return to the cap- claims
ital tomorrow. faith
-- ' keep
Austri
TRIP TO POLE GIVEN' UP Bn
must
assert
Captain Amundsen, Discoverer of trians
South Pole, Abandons fronts
Quest
New York, Oct. 8.-Captain Amund- Ber
sen, discoverer of the south pole, it
was announced today, has abandoned sons'w
his plans for a trip to the north pole. portc
Instrumental in, causing the giving
up of the journey are said to be theat
European war and the recent damages ibiit
to the Panama canal, through which snth
he was to pass on the trip. o t
The journey to the north pole, which ish t
was to have lasted six years, was one
of the explorer's most cherished am-'ues, i
bitions. becomE
bit___s_ events
man e
IE small
FRESHMEN RECEI IL .
to ent
LESSON IN CSTOMSEngla

of

en he

ofd

of the Le-

1913, when he resigned only to
ppointed to the higher office of
cellor. On his severance with
activ)' work at the university, he
e an extended trip throughout
pe, where he desired to study
work in the interests of the
d's Peace movement. To this
Dr. Jordan visited every ruling
r, spoke on the world's peace
ment in each of the several
tries which are now at war, and
apted to make an especial study
ie Balkan States conflict.
ien war broke out, he had been
urope 20 months working in the
e movements, and being com-
d to abandon this work, was ap-
ed one of three persons to rep-
it the United States in looking
eople in Europe who were strand-
n account of the war. Coming
to the United States last Octo-
he was elected president of the
>nal' Education association, in
h capacity he has served for one
Jordan is said to have great
y to talk on a variety of subjects,
is peculiarly gifted in being able
ilk fluently five languages. He
big man physically, and during
regime as president of Leland
ford, built it into one of the more
inent universities of the coun-1
His methods are different from

Dean If. N. Bates, Harry Gault, '17L,
Besides Other Prominent Upper-
classmen Advise Yearlings
FLOCK TO UNION OPEN HOUSE
Michigan men of 1919, the ff'esbimen,
took their first course in Michigan
customs and traditions last night in
Hil auditorium. They learned, from
men who know, a part of what is to
be expected of them during their col-
lege career at the university, and
more than that, they received the cus-
tomary bits of advice and warning
with a genuine enthusiasm.
And still more, after the meeting
was over the whole, body of first year
men, 1,000 strong, put their newly-
learned preachings to practice, and
passed up the idea of a rush-party at
the campus vaudeville theater to at-
tend the monster Open House night
at the Michigan Union.
Francis T. Mack, '16E, was chair-
man of the freshman meeting, and
Dean Henry M.. Bates, head of the
Law school, who was the only fac-
ulty man on the program, headed the
list of speakers. Dean Bates asked
the freshmen to keep the reputation
of the university constantly at heart,
and he made it clear that no period
was ever niore delicate than the pres-
ent, when the university and her
Union campaign were receiving the
attention of the whole country to an
extent that has never been duplicated
by any other single institution.
Student speakers were present to
tell of Michigan institutions and cus-
toms. Louis C. Reimann, '16L, presi-
dent of the university Y. M. C. A.,
told of the work of that organization,
and Harry Gault, '15-'17L, president
(Continued on Page Six)

into Servia has been par
and captured. Reports f
dicate that the invaders 11
fered other heavy losses.
The Teutonic armies:
the Drina and Save river
the Danube, and have ta
tions on the Servign sid
vance lines of the oppos
were repelled.
Field Marshal Von Ma
the 400,000 student soldie
command have also tal
tions on Servian territo
making strenuous efforts
railroad connections b
grade and Saloniki.
A correspondent in 1i
that the Bulgarian army
part of Macedonia.
RECKLESS DRIVING N
RESULTS IN SERIb
As a result of reckles
almost might be called
negligent driving, a 'nur
dents narrowly escaped
a large touring car cras
other machine standing in
Majestic theater last nig
which caused the damage
surrounded by a crowd <
dents who claimed that t
tentionally backed into tl
rounding the other auton:
liceman was on hand, a
the license number of
which was 45.500. The n

London, Oc
today say tha

.'

WHAT'S GOING ON

E

. !

TODAY
Football, Michigan vs. Mt. Union,
Ferry Field, 2:30 o'clock.
Baptist reception, Guild hall, 8:00
o'clock.
Presbyterian reception, McMillan hall,
8:00 o'clock. 4
First Union dance, Michigan Union,;
9:00 o'clock.
Varsity Band meets at 1:30 o'clock in
front of University hall.
TOMORROW
Bishop H. C. Stuntz speaks on "The
Two Americas," Methodist church,,
7:30 o'clock.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION STS.

Leonard A. Barrett

SPEAKS Sunday Morning at 10:30'

Theme: "NECESSITY FOR AN IDEAL"

Students' Bible Classes At Noon

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