100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 05, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DAILY
$2.00
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

y ~

'an

r a:r
Daity

Phones :--Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 54.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENT

NEW LIBRARY TO
BE ONE OF FIEST
II ALt'-ilU1i'N lL9tAR STRUT.
SORI ESi j1i, REII, RO K
WORK TO BEIN NEXT SUMMER
To Have Seminary and Faculty Read-
ing Rooms; Capacity of Stacks
600,000 Volumes
Work on Michigan's new half-mil-
lion dollar Abrary will begin next
summer. The regents have appro-
priated $350,000, and this added to the
value of the old stacks, will make
the value of the new structure close
to $500,000.
The building will have an imposing
appearance. It is to consist of four
stories with six or seven stories of
stacks in the rear. It will be built
of red brick with Bedford limestone
trimmings and a red tile roof. -
The architect is Albert Kahn, of De-
troit, who also designed Hill audi-
torium, the engineering building, and
the new natural science building.
According to the new plans the
main reading room will be on the see-
ond floor and will extend across the
whole front of the building. It will
be 50 feet wide, 170 feet long, and 40
feet liigh, and will be capable of seat-
ing 375. A reading room 50 feet wide
and 72 feet long, is. to be provided on
the first floor for sophomores and
freshmen. The magazine room will
be on the second floor and will hold
four times the number of periodicals
which the present reading room holds.
In all, it is planned that the various
reading rooms can easily accommo-
date 1,000 students, thus making it
large enough for a ~uniersity of
14,000.
The new stacks will be erected at
right angles to the present ones, and
will be capable of holding 600,000 vol-
umes. .Sufficient provision has been
made for future increases in the size
of the building which will make it
possible to hold over a million vol-
umes. This will somewhat surpass the
present capacity of the Harvard li-
brary.
The binding rooms will occupy the
basement and will give that depart-
ment the much needed extra floor
space.
EIRE IN BANK mISABLES
TELEPHONE EXCHANE
Midnight Disaster Puts Several Thou-
sand Phones Out of Commission;
Great Lops Entailed
Several thousand subscribers will
be without telephone service for two
days at least, as a result of a disas-
trous fire in the basement of the State
Savings Bank building, which occur-
red at 12:18 o'clock this morning. On
reaching the scene of the conflagra-
tion, the local fire company discovered
that the basement was in flames. An
overheated furnace is reported to be
the cause of the fire,.
The bank building itself was injured
to no great extent, but several thou-
sand dollars' damage was done to the
telephone exchange located on the

third floor of the building. According
to a statement made by J. J. Kelly,
manager of the exchange, eight pairs
of tables situated in the basement
were destroyed.
Mr. Kelly got into communication
with Detroit at once, and was assured
that workmen would be dispatched im-
mediately. Owing to the fact that the
cables run up to the third floor
(Continued on. Page Six.)

ETROFF E[01100
-lea vs. Swer" ~I1 be SIlj'*Mt u2
S'-ii ItOen a
M1T~tOP i r, , T s ING
Under the auoiees of the "Y,"
)ames Schermerh ? : editor and pub-
isher of the Detrol, wi speak
in University hal e ght at 6:30
o'clock. His su<,Ject a this time will
be, "The P c :s. £ , Sword."
Mr. Schermerhorn is well known on
the campus, where he has appeared on
various occasions. He has a clever
power of narrative, which is not used
in a cheap way, but to illustrate the
point. The treatment of his theme is
always logical and forceful, while his
advice is broad and his thought virile.
The speaker grew up in Hudson,

1~'iil;A fSfl~~U~;; iiai 1ILIAON iD'OLLA 11 iAARY.--Albert 1(alii, A rclilect.

ATTACKST A TELL
.)E4LA)E LL(EliRE AD 'I 0 T
ANGELI UNIT OF DISCONTEN T
If Uned State Had Heeded Anigeips
Adriee it Would Now Be "Under
Heel of the Prussian."
Prof. Claude H. Van Tyne, of the his-
tory department, in an interview ltlst
night as to his opinion of Norman An-
gell, who lectured in University hall
Friday evening, gave out a series of
statements in which he regards the
noted pacifist as a theorist and a
dreamer, and his lecture a public
danger.
In the course of his statenonts,
which follow in full, he attacks the
method of answering questions which
Angell used at the close of his speech.
and by reference stated that the lec-
turer was ojuibbling and attempting to
sweep the audience to conclusion by
a "gust of sentiment." It is these his-
torical conclusions, wrongly conceived,
according to Professor Tan Tyne, that
has called forth this criticism of not
only that defect but also other effects
which he believes result from such a
lecture.
The statements given out by Profes-
sor Van Tyne are as follows:
"You ask my opinion of Norman
Angell, and I suppose I ought not to
give it, because I feel very intolerant
of a man who should be at home help-
ing to save his native land, but who
prefers to stay safely over here
spreading abroad ideas that may ruin
our country. Those who heard him
Friday night know that the report in
the Free Press this morning which, of
course his press agent gave out, doesn't
carry at all the message his real
speech did carry. On the subject of
preparedness, for example, every time
he said he was not opposed to that the
subtle innuendo, and the suggestion
which followed, showed that he was
decidedly opposed to preparedness.
Had his own country listened to his
advice and argument with which he
was so liberal for years before the l

PEAE AGOS" SCA II DEN EFFINGER TO
YF~lTSFORWARLANS0B UNION SPEAKER
IIenry Flord': Peace Ship Left Its Pier
- &P'day Afternoon Amid Will Talk on "Drift and Mastery" at
Mers 0' Throw Meeting at 3:00 r'clock rills
----After dO()n in Clubhouse

.._;New De:. 4.-Amid scenes ex-
traordinary, remarkal2e as to be ai-
mos ieyui oelief, Henry Ford's(
peace ship, Oscar II., steamed out
from its pier at Hoboken this after-
noon bearing a strange assorted com-
pany that has proclaimed that it will
stop the war.
The ship got away at 13 minutes
after 3:00 o'clock. A crowd of fully
12,000 that jammed the Scandinavian-
American line dock, boiled over with
cheerine-, weeming and laughing at
M. Ford whenever one or an-
other or his more or less celebrated
passengers came to the rail to make
a speech.
In all a careful count of the passeng-
er list shows that 142 sailed in the first,
and second cabins. At least a dozen
more came late and were not listed,
and probably 160 made up the party.
The probable actual peace delegates
did not exceed 50.
The last man to bid Ford good-bye
was former S retary of State Will-
iam Je'onngs Bryan. He stayed on
board the ship for half an hour.
Crowded close to the pier when the
ship sailed away were Mr. Bryan,
Mrs. Ford and Edsel Ford.
Among the crowd of college stu-
dents on board the ship was Lee Jos-
lyn, of Michigan. Students from all
corners of the United States were
gathered on board the ship.
FRESHMAN SPREAD A SUCCESS
I) cin., With Cirand March and
Payers, Featured Whole Program
The 35th Freshman Spread of the
university women went down into his-
tory as one of the most joyous occa-
sions ever given in honor of the fresh-
man class.
The grand march, led by Grace,
Raynsford and Helen Brown of the
class of 1918, and Hazel Beckwith and
Helen McAndrew, of the class of 1919,
was a distinct success.
COLLEGE NEWS-PAGE FOUR..
lndiEa ets N'e=Womet's .hormitory
Bloomington, Iff., Dec. 4.-- The re-

QUAi RTE TO SIN AT MEET
With John R. Effinger, Dean of the
College of Literature, Science, and the
Arts, as the speaker of the afternoon,
the weekly Sunday afternoon Union
meeting will be held at 3:00 o'clock
today at the clubhouse. Special music
by a quartet will be part of the pro-
gram.
Dean Effinger will take for his sub-
ject, "Drift and Mastery." The title,
taken from that of a book, should be
of interest to all college men.
The quartet for the occasion is to
N:
a
I)EAN J. R. EFFINGER,
of the Literary College, Principal
Speaker at the Union This Afternoon
be composed of S. H. Riggs, '18, Ray-
niond G. Day, '17E, C. B. Starring, '17E,
and C. I. Myers, '18.
The meeting will be an informal
gathering for all university men and
will last about an hour. These after-
noon meetings prove a popular as-
sembly and Dean Effinger will prob-
ably be greeted with a large audience.
SENTENCE KARL BUENZ
TO , S,_PENETARY
hlead of 1laniburg-American Line in
America Found Guilty of
Conspiracy
New York, Dec. 4-Karl Buenz, head
of the IHamburg-American line in
America, former minister of Mexico
this port for the Kaiser, was sentenced
(Continued on Page Six.)
UILD CT URE
.. Barbour, D. D.
ter Theological Seminary
JECT:
hnurchTO-NIGHT
t h U T~hat 4:30

HUERTA PLOT PUTS'
BOY-ED AND PAPEN
GUIDIANE lt li I FACTS AB('T
A LJiEG4E P LATTERS BEFORE
REALLIN(G THE3I
REIKSTAG TALKS OF PEACE
News From Bethmnan-Hollweg Awaited
by All Governments; Press
Wants War's Close
New York, Dec. 4.-Captain Franz
von Papen and Captain Boy-ed, two
attaches of the German embassy,
whose activities in naval and military
affairs have been displeasing to the
administration, directed the sending of
more than $12,000,000 to prepare for
a revolution in Mexico such that it
would put Victoriano Huerto back in
power and bring that country face. to
face with the United States. This was
learned today from the Mexican con-
sulate in this city.
The story involves Lieutenant Franz
Rincelef, the wealthy German who for
several months was leader of the Ger-
man propaganda in this country, and
Andrew Gneloy, a proinoter with in-
terests in Mexico, who acted as a sort
of scout for Rincelef. These two men-
prepared the way for the warlike work
that was done afterward by the two
German attaches. It also showed how
the Germans employed Mexican wo-
men to help in their plans, how they
paid thousands of dollars to American
women to aid in gaining information
and in finding Mexicans who would
sell their passports obtained from the
Mexican government to Germans.
Germans Demand Evidence
Washington, Dec. 4.-Germany will
not permit the cases against Captains
Boy-ed and von Papen to be closed
with the mere requirements by this
country for their recall. Germany will
nsist upon the statement of the evi-
dence upon which the United States
Lias taken its action.
Although no instructions have so
aar reached Washington from Berlin;
Lhere is good reason to believe that
Ihe German government will ask for
(Continued on Page Six.)
04TH CONGRESS OPENS
epresentative Kitchen Opposed to
Wilson's Preparedness
Plans

,JAMES SCILEIUIIEHORIN,
Who Will 1e the "" S-pcker Today
Mich., and was a newspaper reporter
for a number of years. In 1900 he
started the Detroit Times, which he.
has successfully issued until now it
is considered one of the cleanest pa-
pers in the state. He has been a
member of the state committee of the
Y. M. C. A. for over 15 years and he
has always been ready to assist in
the work with his time and voice.
A special program of musical num-
bers has been arranged for the "Y"
meeting this evening. F. W. Grover,
'18, of Michigan Union opera fame,
will sing. An orchestra will furnish
additional music for the services.
WILSON TOWED DECEMBE 1 8
No Invitations Issued to Ceremony of
President's Mirriage
Washington, Dec. 4. - President
Woodrow Wilson and Mrs. Edith Bol-
ling Galt will be united in marriage
on Saturday, December 18. The cere-
mony will be quiet, and will be held at
the bride-to-be's residence, 1308 North-
west Twentieth street, of this city.
This statement was announced offi-
cially at the White House today, just
before the President left for his cus-
tomary automobile ride with his
fiancee.

. . W.,_.__.... ry

i

HA'S GOING

I

war, it would now be ground under ;eats of the Iinversity of Indiana
the heel of the Prussian. I do not have approved plans for the erection
doubt his earnestness and good infen- of a new dormitory for women on the
tion, but he is a theorist willing to campus.
risk the fate of his nation on logic
more than dubious, and lessons drawn
from such facts in history as please
his peculiar taste. When bounds and W ESL
nations cease to be, and when human-
ity has been won from passion to rea-
son, when in a word the Golden Age ev. Clarence A
has come, we may safely listen to President of the Roches
such delightful dreamers, but in a SUB
country beset by dangers, insulted, al- i6
most ignored, and placed in the midst THE ASESI
of a world bathed in blood and rentE
with war,. we must use the lamp of TO-NIGHTi
(Continued on Page Six.) at 7:30 M thod

TODAY.
Union get-together, Michigan Union,
3:00 o'clock.
James Schermerhorn speaks at "Y" U-
hall meeting, 6:30 o'clock.
Dr. C. A. Barbour speaks, Methodist
church, 7:30 o'clock.
"The Devil: l's Rise and Fall," by
Rev. Loring, Unitarian church, 10:30
o'clock.
.-Hop .comittee meets, Union, at
4:30 o'clock.
TOMORROWY.
Micig anDamnes entertan
of out of town students, Newberry hall
at 7:30 o'clock:
Campaign smoker for Glee Club
concert, Delta Cafe, 8:00 o'clock.

Washington, Dec. 4.-The 64th Con-
gress will start off Monday with the
Democratic leaders at odds over the
question of national consent as to'
what measures shall be introduced to
raise revenues and funds to prepare
the army and navy against the time
of possible warfare.
In the House of Representatives,
Kitchen, a Democratic leader, is op-
posed to the national defensive pro-
gram of the administration. Notwith-
standing the popular demand for pre-
parAdness, there is a deep current of
sentiment against the appropriation
for the two military establishments. It
is notably true of the delegation from
the southern states.
Representative Doremus, of Michi-
gan, dropped the remark that the
cause of preparedness was especially
strong in Michigan.
Washington, Dec. 4.-As a result of
action taken today by the Democratic
caucus of the House of Representa-
tives the southern states are once
again in control of the lower branch of
Congress. Of - the 68 committees in
the House, southern members will oca
cupy 37 chairmanships. Twenty-one
were allotted to members from the
north and west.

You will
want to

jar °, .
(^'

rn I r

see the

co

CE&

Soon

R

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan