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December 02, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-02

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1

THE DAILY
$2.00
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

The

Michigan

Daily

1

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 980
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY
NEW YORK SUN

HlEj

s

V

mmm"MI

VOL XXVI. No. 51. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1915. PRICE FIVE CENTS

MILTARYTRANIN6'
I\MATTER REFERRED
;TONEVY COM MITTEE

SEND 2000 TO FI HT VILLA
Troops Granted Permis&ion to Pass
Through United States

UNION FUND GIVEN
'SNOW MEMORIAL,

FRATERNITY HOUSE ROBBED

Suim of $21 Taken Yesterdaty
Pilferers

bI

FOUR. MEMBERS OF COMMITTEE
TO MAKE INVESTIGATION; RE-
PORT AT NEXT SESSION.
PICK PLANS FOR NEW LIBRARY
Budget of $69,391.03 Approved by the
Board for Summer School
of,1916,
Compulsory military training at
Michigan will not be finally decided
oni at present, according to action tak-
en by the board of regents in referring
the matter to a committee of four at
their meeting yesterday, morning.
The new committee, composed of
Regents Hubbard of Houghton, Han-
chett of Grand Rapids, Bulkley of De-
troit, and Sawyer of Hillsdale, are to
make the investigations necessary for
a question of such import and report
for definite action at the next meet-
i4$
All of the regents expressed them-
selves individually as being in favor'
of the national program of military
preparedness, but the reason given
for their action was that they felt
that a matter of such importance to
the university as compulsory military,
training needed more thorough inves-
tigation than they could give it in
one meeting.
Pick Library Plans.
At the afternoon meeting of the
board, the final decision was made as
to the plans for the new library, and
instructions will be sent to Architect
Kahn to develop the specific plans for
the building pictured by the architects
sketch which was favored.
Approve Budget.
A budget of $69,391.53 for the sum-
mer school of 1916 was approved, thus
providing for a slight increase over
the work of this nature that was done
last year. New courses in Semetics,
under Professor Waterman, in Spanish
to meet the increased demand for
knowledge of this language in this
country; in English, a course in busi-
ness corresllondence for teachers and
in economics were added to the sum-
mer curriculum. Provision was made
for renewing the course in fine arts
under Prof. H. R. Cross, as well as ad-
ding to the instruction in American
history by the appointment of Prof.
H. E. Bolton of the University of Cali-
fornia. Work in library methods was
strengthened 'by the appointment of
Mr. A. S. Root of Oberlin as an addi-
tional non-resident lecturer, the main
work continuing to be under Dr. W.
W. Bishop.
Consider Plan of Olivett
Communications relative to inaug-
urating a five year engineering course
combining two years of work at Oli-
vet with three years of work at Michi-
gan were received. Steps have been
taken to adopt this scheme in accord-
ance with a plan inaugurated by the
adoption of the same co-operative
(Continued on Page 6)
"I BZAAR OPEN TO MEN
Annual Christmas Fete to Allow Men
for First Time; Women of
Faculty Contribute
For the first time in history men
will invade the sanctuary of a Y. W.
C. A. function. Cards have been sent
to the various fraternity houses invit-
ing the men to attend the annual
Christmas bazaar which will be held
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of
next week, where they can purchase
gifts for all the family for Christmas.
The women of Martha Cook Build-
ing are to have charge of the doll
booths. The Newberry women will be

represented by some activity the na-
ture of which, however, is a dark
secret. The women of the faculty will
contribute by giving candy and home
baked kgoods.
At the miscellaneous booth will be
an array of local views calendars,
Christmas booklets and cards and oth-
er novelties appropriate for gifts.
A Japanese tea room will be open
from 2:30 to 5:30 o'clock each after-
noon and tea, wafers and ice cream
will be served.
Freda Siegworth is in charge of the
work.

Douglas, Ariz., Dec. 1.-General
Obregon, Carranza's general in
charge of Sonora operations, today
entrained 2,000 of his forces at No-
gales, Sonora, for Aqua Prieta, oppo-
site this place, to operate against
Villa's forcesetsouth of here. The
troops were sent 'through the United
States by permission of the war de-
partment.
The 3,000 troops remaining at No-
gales under General Obregon are to
be used in operations against the Villa
forces in that section of Sonora. The
sudden return of part of his forces to
Aqua Prieta, adjoining Naco, however
indicate that Obregon believes General
Villa is coming back in this direction.
The Carranza commanders appear
not to know the definite whereabouts
of Villa- himself. The activity of the
Villa forces have so increased in the
last few days that Americans are
again fleeing from all of the mining
camps south of here.
e -
SENIOR LAWS APPOINT
ALL. CLASS COMMITTEES
Choose Men Who Will Take Care of
Banquet, Smoker, Finances, Class
Sing and Other Functions
Appointments to committees as giv-
en out by LeRoy J. Scanlon, president
of the, senior law class, are as fol-
lows:
Social committee-Chairman, John
Scott; A. J. Michelson; A. R. Johnson;
Paul Thompson; H. M. Reid.
Banquet committee - Chairman,
James Nichols; Lyle Clift; Thomas
McNamara; E. W. Finkle.
All-law smoker committee-Chair-
man, Walter E. Morse; Donald Stiver;
M. McLaren.
. Executive committee-Chairman, C.
B. Zewadski; W. W. Paisley; Chester
Morse.
Washington Birthday committee--
Chairman, Renville Wheat; Hugh Al-
lerton; C. B. Marks.
Picture committee-Chairman, W.
W. Brucher; W. Leslie Miller; W. M.
Skillman.
Auditing committee - Chairman,
Harry Parker; Carl Folks; D. W.
Welling; Louis Dunton.
Finance committee-Chairman, F. G.
Millard; H. D. Brown; George Cooper;
K. R. Ferguson.
Union dinner committee-Chairman,
C. A. Swainson; Perry Stevens; Clyde
Rowan; C.- P. Wapples.
Invitation committee - Chairman,
Warren Talcott; John Milaniphy; Wil-
liam Essery; Emerson Woolf; L. ID.
Cooper.
Cane committee-Chairman, Eugene
McCall; G. A. Barnes; F. M. McHale.
Cap and gown committee-- Chair-
man, G. S. Frary; Paul Eger; R. E.
Richardson..
Promenade committee- Chairman,
Lash Thomas; L. D.-Metzger; Herbert
Potter.
Class memorial committee-Chair
man, R. O. Brownell; W. T. Pierson;
J. F. Tallman; M. Weinberger.
Senior -sing-Chairman, P. A. Har-
tesveldt; M. R. Fitts; K. M. Stevens.
Reception committee-Chairman, Har-
ry Sutter; L. M. Brush; W. W. Schroe-
der; David Kennedy.
Class day committee-Chairman,
Harry Bell; Ray Mills; W. J. Good-
win; J. A. Blockwood.
CHARLES L. GOLDSTEIN, '17,
VICTOR IN CANDLE CONTEST
Charles L. Goldstein, '17, emerged
the victor in the candle contest at the
Zal-Gaz Grotto bazaar, last week in
Weinberg's Coliseum. Wilkinson's

second-hand store had offered a prize
to the one who could guess most ac-
curately the time that it would take
for a large two-foot candle to burn
out. Goldstein estimated that it
would take 55 hours, 38 minutes and
14 seconds for the candle to complete-
ly burn out. The exact time that it
took was 55 hours, 42 minutes and 4
seconds. Goldstein received a hand-
some leather travelling bag as a prize
for his good guess.
Gov. H. Johnson Contracts Bronchitis.
San Francisco, Dec. 1.-Gov. Hiram
W. Johnson is suffering from an acute
attack of bronchitis and is confined;
to his bed.

Sister of Late Athlete Donates
Union Project; Snow, Michi-
gau's Chief Athletic Hero

to

LEE JOSLYN WILL S9iL
[[N FO'S P[ECE SKIP,
OSCAR Ilb;LEAVES TODAY
Joslyn Required by Conditions of In-
vitation to Write Thesis
on Return

JI

BOYER CONTRIBUTES $25,000j

Announcement has just been made
of a contribution to the Michigan Un-
ion building fund by Mrs. H. H. San-
ger, dedicated to the memory of her
brother, the late Neil W. Snow, '02,
Michigan's most popular athletic hero.
Among the former Michigan athletes
none is mentioned at the Union head-
quarters as often as Neil Snow who
won more "M's" than any other man
who ever went to Michigan. A large
picture of Snow now occupies a prom-
inent place in the main room of the
Union.
Another important contribution to
the Union fund announced lately was
one for $2,500 cash, presented by Jo-
seph Boyer, president of the Bur-
;oughs Adding Machine Co.
Mr. Boyer is not an alumnus of
Michigan, but said in making his gift
that all citizens of Michigan should
do all in their power to assist the
present Union campaign, that being,
in his opinion, one of the most im-
portant undertakings ever begun by
the state university. ,
Detroit's contribution to the Union
fund is now almost $175,000, and of
that sum $25,000 has been contributed
by public spirited men, who have
never attended Michigan.
HOLD MAN FOR INVESTIGATION
AT PLANT OF DU PONT CO.
Penn's Grove, N. J., Dec. 1.-A man
with 65 feet of fuse wrapped around
his body was arrested here this after-
noon in the vicinity of the Carney's
Point plant of the DuPont Powder
company. The authorities are holding
him for investigation. It is believed
his arrest may throw some light on
the mystery surrounding the explosion
at the Hadley plant of the DuPont
Powder company yesterday afternoon..
SELECT PERSONNEL Of
FRESHM GLEE CLUB
Total of 31 Me Chosen for Both
Organizations After Series
of Try-Outs
P. A. Hartesvelt, '16L, vice-presi-
dent of the university musical clubs,
has chosen the following men as rep-
resentatives of the Freshman Glee
club at the second tryout held last
night.
The names of the men who were
chosen are: C. H. Cottington, first
tenor; George Llewellyn, first tenor;
George K. Forrester, first tenor; G.
Karl Bolinder, first tenor; Joseph
Rosenfeld, secondtenor; Erv. Howard,
second tenor; Paul Avery, second
tenor; Peter C. Greleaver, baritone;
Scott E. Lamb, baritone; Gaylord 0.
Russel, baritone; Terrence I. Quinn,
baritone; G. R. Byrue, second bass;
Alfred Beckowitz, second bass; John
H. Hanger, second bass; Don Yerkes,
second bass.
Final selection of members for the
freshman mandolin club made by
Oliver 0. Leininger, '16D, director, af-
ter the tryouts last night, are as fol-
lows:
First Mandolins-Eugene Steketee,
Austin Norton, Carl Gingrich, C. H.
Cottington, L. H. Mattern; second
mandolins, G. Peterson, Stanley To-
bias, R. F. Floreseman, C. B. Jamison,
Richard George, Merrit Bruch; first
violin, Robert Tanner; second violin,
C. G. Fuss; guitars, S. H. Wolfe, G.
W. Furlor, H. B. Hinchman.
DIXIE CLUB TO GIVE DANCE
AT PACKARD SATURDAY NIGHT
A dance will be given by the Dixie

club next Saturday evening at 9:00'
o'clock at Packard Academy. All
southerners are eligible to attend this
affair. Refreshments will be served
and Ike Fisher's orchestra will pro-
vide the music. Feature dances will
be part of the evening's novelties.
Tickets may be secured for the con-
sideration of $1.00, and can be re-
served by calling Owen J. Watts at
1166.

"Robbers entered the Chi Psi lodge
at .the corner of State and Monroe
st'reets yesterday and obtained for
their labors the sums of $15.00 and
$6.00 from two of the. men living in
the lodge.
The burglary occurred at 11:00
o'clock in the morning when the men
were just coming from classes. The
men when they went to lunch discov-
ered their losses and immediately noti-
fied the police. The police last night
reported that they had not discovered
who the burglars were.
STUDENT COUNCIL TO DISCUSS
MILITARY TRAINING TONIGHT
Discussion of the proposed military
training will be held at the regular
meeting of the student council in
University hall this evening. Some
routine work will also be disposed
of, and the question of fire escapes for
the renovated north wing of Univer-
sity hall is to be decided.
PROF, FRIDAY OUTLINES
UNIVERSITY FUNCTION
Says Expert and Cultural Taining is
Subordinate to That of
Personality
"The Function of the University in
a Democracy," was the subject of a
speech made by Prof. David Friday,
of the economics department, given
last night at the membership dinner
at the Union.
"How to organize a university to
carry out its function as a democracy,"
said Professor Friday, "is a pressing
problem. Democracy means opportu-
nity. It means the giving of every
man a chance. It is certain that
America is trying to succeed in this.
ideal. It is certain that endeavors are
being made to give the lower classes
a chance.
"The university is considered a
place where one gets expert training
in some vocational field. A man comes
to the university to get expert train-
ing in some particular line and by
means of it to raise himself from one
class to another. Expert training is
the function of the university; the ac-
quiring of a special line of knowledge
in a special field.
"But an entirely different function
of the university is quite as import-
ant. Cultural ideals, art, music, lit-
erature, are just as important a func-
tion of the university.
"It is the function of the university
to train men to idealize life; to make
one ideal, one pursuit in life greater
than any other. This is where the
university is weakest, where the stu-
dent body is weakest. A pig wollow-
ing in the mud is happy. It is not
the attainment of happiness that is
important. It is how we make our-
selves happy that counts.
"But the development of expert
training and artistic ability is sub-
ordinate to the development of our
personality. That after all, men is
what counts most with you. We may
develop it by copying after other per-
sonalities. Perhaps the greatest thing
in education is the meeting of inspir-
ing and magnetic personalities. There
is no such thing as the development
of personality without.deep and heart-
felt sympathy.
"It is the function of the university
to develop expert capacity, artistic
ability and personality. The attain-
ment of these ideals will be to develop
a higher type of personality than has

ever before been produced. When this
ideal has been attained it will be the
great movement toward universal ed-
ucation that put universities, public
and private, into every part of the
country that was the particular cause
of that type of personality."
SOPH LITS TO HOLD SMOKER
AT MICHIGAN UNION TONIGHT
Soph lits will hold their first smoker
of the year at 7:30 o'clock at the
Michigan Union tonight.
Prof. A. H. Lloyd will speak on mil-
itary training. The program will in-
clude music by "Ike" Fischer's orches-
tra,. and various songs and talks by
local talent.

POSSIBILITY
ALSO BE

THAT PARIS MAY
VISITED ON TRIP

SHIP TO LAND AT STOCKHOLM;
PARTY THEN GOES TO COPEN-
HAGEN AND THE HAGUE
Lee E. Joslyn, '17, of Detroit, leaves
today as the unofficial undergraduate
representative of the University of
Michigan on Henry Ford's peace ship,
Oscar II. Joslyn received the follow-
ing telegram from Mr. Ford last night:
"Mr. Ford wishes me to cordially
invite you to accompany him as his
guest on the steamer Oscar II, leaving,
New York City December 4. Ticket
to New York is being arranged and
should be called for at station. Apply
to chief clerk of local court for pass-
port application at once.
"Sincerely yours,
"LOUIS P. LOCHNER,
"Secretary to Henry Ford."
Saturday the steamer Oscar II.
starts on a six weeks' trip to Europe
in an attempt to band the neutral na-
tions together in a league to bring
the warring peoples to peace. Joslyn,
as the university unofficial represen-
tative, will be required by the condi-
tions upon which he was invited to
become a, member of this party, to
write upon his return, a thesis which
will eibody what he has learned of
existing conditions, and in what way
they have been improved by the work
of the peace mission.
From New York the ship will go
directly to Stockholm, Sweden, and
after a stop there will proceed to
Copenhagen, Denmark, and thence to
The Hague. There is a possibility
that Paris will also be visited before
the ship turns again towards America.
New York, Dec. 1.-Shortly after
their receipt of dispatches here say-
ing that Holland would forbid Henry,
Ford's peace party, which leaves on
Saturday aboard the Oscar Ii., from
using its soil as a peace forum, Mr.
Ford sent to Dr. Mougas, foreign min-
ister of the Netherlands, a cablegram
denying that his party intended to
force a strike among the fighting sol-
diers.
REV. L. C. DOUGLAS TO ADDRESS
MEN AT "Y" BIBLE SCHOOL
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas will give the
first of a series of three talks on
"Modern Interpretations of the Scrip-
tures," to be given before the Y. M.
C. A. school for studies in religion, in
his address tonight at 7:00 o'clock, on
the "Inspiration of the Scriptures," at
McMillan hall. The series is to be
completed before the Christmas vaca-
tion after which another series will
be commenced.
Groups for men in the freshman,
sophomore, junior and senior classes
in the literary, and engineering col-
leges will be organized in addition to
the five groups already underway.

AUTINEMPEROR
NAMES THREE NEW
CAINET MEMBERS.
ACCEPTS RESIGNATION UPON CON-
DITION THAT SERVICES COULD
STILL BE HAD
TEUTONS MARCHINTO ALBANIA
Russians Take Two New Positions;
Exchange Many Prisoners
Through Sweden
London, Dec. 1.-Emperor Francis
Joseph of Austria has accepted the
resignation of three of his ministers
and appointed successors. The re-
signing members are: Doctor Karl
Heinolt Dudynski, minister of the in-
tenior; Doctor Rudolf Fchester Head-
ler von Bonnett, minister of com-
merce, and Baron Sengelgon Main-
felds, minister of finance.
Their successors are respectively:
Prince Hohenloag Schillingfsuerst,
president of the supreme court of ac-
counts; Ritter von Leth, governor of
postal savings bank, and Herr von
Fitsmueller, director of the Credit
Amstalt.
The Austrian emperor's acceptance
of the three resignations is confirmed
by a telegraphic letter copied by the
Wider Zeitung. The letter states that
the emperor accepted the resignations
upon condition that the services of
the three retiring cabinet members be
at his disposal "when desired."
Teutons Enter Albania
Berlin, Dec. 1.-Teutonic. and Bul-
garian troops are crossing the Ser-
bian frontier today and pursuing the
fleeing Serbs southward through the
Albanian mountains. The Serbs are
making no further organized resist-
ance. The country is so broken that
opportunity for . ambushes are nu-
merous.
Russians Win Two Positions
Petrograd, Dec. 1.-After two days
of fighting the Turks were dislodged
from two fortified positions neaT the
village of Barkounes, in the Caucasus,
and were pursued by the Russians, ac-
cording to an official report issued to-
night.
Prisoners Exchanged Through Sweden
Stockholm, Dec. 1.-Since the ar-
rangements were made to exchange
incapacitated prisoners by way of'
Sweden, 4,400 Germa'ns and 7,550 Rus-
sians have been transferred 4y the
Swedish railway.
F. A. VANDERLIP SAYS THAT-
WAR PROFITS MAY STOP SOON
Claims That Europe Will be Unable
to Pay America for Her
Materials
New York, Dec. 1.-Frank A. Van-
derlip, president of the National City,
bank, told the American Society of
Woolen and Worsted Manufacturers at
the Waldorf today, that war profits
may stop before the war does, because
of the inability of Europe to pay us.
He frankly derided the notion that
just because the countries need ma-
terials they can buy them somehow or
other. He added that "business is
running in this country at full tilt
today and that our present problem is
to make ourselves independent of war
profits as soon as possible. That we
can do it if we try. There is enough
capital here to give every man a job

if only conditions can be brought
about to inspire enongh confidence in
its owners.
"Increased pay affords no relief to
millions if wasteful products con-
tinues. The only way to ameliorate
the conditions of the masses is to
bring about larger and cheaper pro-
ducts of things needed."

_

-A

WIIAT'S GOING ON

.I

TODAY.
Soph lits smoker, Michigan Union
,7:30 o'clock.
Faculty concert, Hill auditorium, 4:15
o'clock.
Fresh pharmic meeting, room 303,
Chem. building, 4:45 o'clock.
Phoenix club reception for Totem
club, Phoenix house, 8:00 o'clock.
Classical club meeting, room A, Me-
morial hall, 7:15 o'clock.
J-Lit indoor baseball practice, Wa-
terman gym, 7:00 o'clock.
Dr. E. Huntington speaks, Science
building auditorium, 4:15 and 8:00
o'clock.
Rev. Douglas speaks, "Y" Bible school,
McMillan hall, 7:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Exhibition shoot, Ferry Field, 3:00
o'clock.
Norman Angell speaks, U hall, 8:00
o'clock.
Beatrice Forbes Robertson Hale speaks
high school auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Wright Saxophone party, Union, 9:00
o'clock..

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PLAYING FAIR.
Ad W. Riter saysF:
Mr. Merchant:
If you are "playing fair"
with yourself you are consis-
tently displaying in THE MICH-
IGAN DAILY.
Mr. Student:
If YOU are "playing fair" with
yourself you are consistently
reading and heeding MICHIGAN
DAILY ads.
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