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November 30, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-30

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$2.0
r NEWS OF THE[E WORID AND
" THlE CAMPUS

The

Michigan

Daily

TE
K'N

VOL. XVI No. 49.

___

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1915

PRICE FIN

.. 5

DONAL SARBAUGH
GETS INYITATIUN
TO GO WITH FORD
JUNIOR LAW STUDENT ASKED TO
REPRESENT UNIVERSITY IN
PEACE ARGOSY
37 HAVE ACCEPTED PROPOSAL
Requested to Nominate Substitute, If
-lle Does Not Accompany
Expedition

_

VOTE !

WEDNESDAY TEIIEsBOARD OF REGENTS MEET TO
CONCIDERTHERESOLUTIONS CONCERNING MILITARY
TRAINING FOR THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN WHICH HAVE BEEN SENT UP TO THEM
BY THE FACULTY. IF THE REGENTS ACT IN'THE
AFFIRMATIVE ON THIS QUESTION IT WILL LARGELY
CHANGE THE COMPLEXION OF UNDERGRADUATE
LIFE.
THE FACULTY HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED
THEIR FOILMAL OPINION, BUT THE STUDENTS, WHO
ARE THE MOST VITALLY INTERESTED, HAVE TAKEN
NO COCERTED STAND ON EITHER SIDE OF THE
QUESTION. THAT' OUTLINES THE PURPOSE OF THIS
BALLOT.
THE QUESTION PUT TOr YOU CONCERNS ONLY THE
QUESTION OF COMPULSORY TRAINING. YOU ARE IN
FAVOR OF IT OR YOU ARE NOT. MARK YOUR CHOICE.
ANSWER ONE OF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS
WITH AN "X."
I DO FAVOR COMPULSORY MILITARY TRAINING-.
SD NOT FAVOR COMPULSORY MILITARY TRAIN-
ING

Doiald M. Sarbaugh, '17L, received
an Anvitation to go as Henry Ford's
gut on the steamer Oscar II. to the
foreign peace conference, by telegram
Vonday aft rnoon. The message read
as follows:
"Mr. Henry Ford asks leave to re-
quest that you will specify whether
you would consider joining his party
as his guest on his peace mission De-
cember 4. The trip will last about
six weeks. Only a small number can
be selected, if you would consider go-
ing, you are asked to wire your reply
furnishing details of your college
work and activity. If not, would you
wire collect at once any recommenda-
tion for a substitute, furnishing sim-
ilar details."
(Signed) LOUIS P. LOCHNER,
Secretary to Henry Ford..
"The message came as a complete
surprise to me," said Sarbaugh Mon-
day evening. "I have absolutely no
idea of the -way Mr. Ford ever came
to choose me for this honor.
"As yet I have come to no conclu-
sion in the matter, but have sent a
telegram requesting further details"
Coming as this message does just
after the statement that Mr. Ford in-
tended to invite undergraduates on hh
ship, it bears out fully the intention
of that peace advocate.
New -York, Nov. 29.-Thus far 37
persons have accepted Henry Ford's
invitation to sail on Saturday in the
peace ship, Oskar II., to clear the
trenches before Christmas. Today
part of the steerage was reserved for
the party in addition to the first and
second cabin which combined accom-
modated nearly 400.
Many friends of the Detroit million-
aire sent enscouraging messages, but
seemed very sorry that other matters
prevented their helping Mr. Ford stop
the war.
AKECHOICE FOR.
VRSITYQUARTET
Davis, Grover, Wilson and Hiett Meet
Final Approval of Theodore
Harrison
TO APPEAR ON DECEMBER 10TH
Theodore Harrison, head of the voice
department of the School of Music,
and director of the Glee glub, an-
nounced the final selections for the
Varsity quartet last night. The or-
ganization will be composed of Horace
L. Davis, '17, first tenor; Frank W.E
Grover, '18, second tenor; U. Stanley
Wilson, '16, baritone; and Stanley 3
Hiett, '16L, bass.
In the opinion of Mr. Harrison, the
Varsity quartet should represent the
best possible blending of voices. He
has not endeavored to decide upon the-
four best singers among the men bu
has picked out a quartet whose voices
blend together in the best possible
manner,
Thequartet will appear at the con-
cert of the combined musical clubs on
December 10.
Government Rests Conspiracy Case
New York, Nov. 29.-The govern-;
ment rested its case against the Ham-
burg-American line today. Four of
the five officials of the company are
being held. The counsel for the de-
fense wanted to know this afternoon
whether the accusation included Cap-
tain Boy-Ed, naval attache for the
Kaiser, who is also charged with con-
spiracy.
Former Prosecutor Dies

Reed City, Mich., Nov. 29.-B. N.-
Savidge, '79, late.prosecuting attorney
of Osceola county, died at his home
here this morning.

'~ V

STUDENT BODY TO
VOICE OPINION ON
MILITARY TRAINING
UNDER DIRECTION OF FRANCIS T.
MACK, 'IE DAILY HOLDS
STRAW BALLOT TODAY
VOTE BETWEEN12:30 AND 2:30
Committee Urges Every Man and Wfo-
man to Vote in Order to Aseer-
tain Feeling on Campus
The straw ballot upon the proposed
plan of compulsory military training,
conducted by The Daily, under the
direction of Francis T. Mack, '16E,
will be held between the hours of
12:30 and 2:30 today. Ballot boxes
will be distributed around the campus
and every attempt made to secure a
representative vote on the question.
Ever since the recommendation of
the university senate that the board
of regents adopt the plan of compul-
sory training, the campus has engaged
in a vigorous debate over the proposi-
tion. The Daily has been deluged
with contributions discussing the
question. Prof. A. H. Lloyd's recent
contribution to the New York Times
was occasioned by the proposal, and
the first Forum meeting was turned
over to an open debate upon the ques-
tion.
The committee has done everything'
possible to insure the success of the
ballot. "All we desire," said Chairman1
Mack; "is that every student in the
university votes one way upon the
proposed plan."
Ballot boxes will be found in Uni-
versity hall, the library, and the Med-
icine, Engineering, and Law buildings.
The one in the library is especially forl
the women of the university. The re-
sults will be presented to the board of
regents when they meet tomorrow to
take final action upon the proposition.
MUSICAL WRITERS
MEE[TFOR OPERA,

S. A. i E IN FVRO
593E.I yl uSTARTING BRANCH AT
SUNIVERSITY OFMICHIGAN

R , M t l l U~ s i l U U U i L
FAVORSMILITARY TRAININGRTOSSMAN OPPOSES PLAN
F. V. SLOCUM ADVOCATES IN'TRO- CITES ARGUMENTS TO PRO.VE

DUCTION OF SYSTEM I COL-
LEGES AND UNIVERSITIES y
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
There are, at present, many schenies
on foot for doing away with war, and
while most of us hope that this de-
sirable end will eventually be reach-
ed none of these plans have yet been
proved effective. The world is still
'in the condition where no nation can
afford to do away with military pre-
paration and feel secure from attack.
In any consideration of the question
of preparednessfi we should endeavor
to .look at the facts as we find them.
If means should be taken for prepara-
tion which are justified under present
conditions; but which will be found
unmecessary, later, due to new de-
velo'pments in the world politics; then
steps can be taken by the government
of this country to put itself in sym-
pathy with this change. If the board
of regents should pass a rule that
military drill be introduced into the
University and subsequently military
preparation should be found totally
unnecessary, this ruling would not
like the laws of the Medes and Per-
sians be unchangeable.
Can We Resist Foreign Aggression?
The question which arises is: Are
we prepared to resist foreign aggres-
sion, to maintain our principles of
government, and to keep the respect
of the world? We must not mistake
the question of preparedness as par-
tizan. The representative leaders of
the great parties, Mr. Taft, Mr.
Roosevelt, and Mr. Wilson are all in
favor of a greater amount of prepara-
tion.
The answer can only be no, when it
is remembered that there are six
world powers with sufficient offensive
strength to make the success of an
Anvasion possible. In the war of 1812
a foreign army of only five thousand
men was able to land and burn the
city of Washington, due solely to the
fact that our untrained militia would
not stand and fight trained soldiers.
In. the present war great quantities of
nriaterial and large armies are trans-
ixorted thousands of miles, in spite of
submarines. It is significant that in
the last naval maneuvers the attack-
ing party was successful.
Napoleon Made Force Pay
Surely there will be a temptation
to use force to acquire an advantage
if it seen that itcan be donenprofit-
obly. Napoleon carried on one war
after another for a period of more
than twenty years and many of those
wars, by forced contributions exacted
from the conquered country, -werej
made to pay for themselves. I wish
to make two quotations from the ar-
ticle entitled, "What is Worth Fight-
ng 'For?" in the last number of the
"Atlantic Monthly."
"Nor will it suffice to quote Plato,
and take comfort in the thought thatj
ideals are themselves eternal and in-
corruptable. For that which enemies
threaten and champions defend, is not
the ideal itself, but some earthly mor-
(Continued on Page 6)

MILITARY TRAINING SUPPORT-
ERS IN WRONG
To the Students of the University of
Michigan:
A study of the discussions on com-
pulsory military training which have
appeared in The Daily, reveals the
fact that two main points have receiv-
ed the consideration of its proponents
and, in addition to these, its opponents
have dealt with a third. It is asserted:
1. That compulsory military train-
ing will benefit the students.
2. That it will benefit the state.
Particularizing on the first point,
they tell us:
(a) That students will learn obedi-
ence to authority.
(b) That they will be "better-
groomed and better-mannered young
collegians."
(c) That they will derive great ben-
efit from the physical training in-
volved in the drill.
Concerning the benefit to the state,
they assert:
(a) That military training will pro-
vide the nation with a class of trained
men from, which "company officers"
for volunteers can be selected in case
of war.
Concerning voluntary training they
assert:
(a) That it has not -been "success-
ful."
In this entire argument the burden
of proof rests with the proponents of
this plan. Yet almost without excep-
tion, their assertions are unsupported
by proof. To be sure, we have the
personal opinions of Mr. Taft, as ex-
pressed off-hand to a reporter; we
have the opinion of the president of
Cornell (an ardent "preparedness"
,man); and statements, on student au-
thority, that compulsory training is
"successful" at Illinois, O. S. U., and
M. A C.
Notwithstanding this testimony, we
deny that Michigan men are inferior,
either in formal obedience or in gen-
eral deportment, to students of such
institutions as Cornell or M. A. C.
It seems apparent that statements to
this effect are unsupported, and in-
deed unsupportable, by one scintilla
of evidence.
We deny that the physical benefits
to be derived from military training,
according to the proposed plan, are
in any degree commensurate with the
expenditure of time and money de-
manded of the students. We assert,
moreover, that even from the point of
(Continued on Page 6)

Receive Constitution From Cornell
Organization; to be Read
and Considered
WILL DISCUSS PROBLEMS OF
INTEREST TO STUDENT BODY
PLAN TALKS OF INTEREST TO
MEN OF ALL DEPART-
M ENTS
The Society of Automobile Engi-
neers, one of the strongest engineering
societies in America, has already ex-
pressed itself as heartily in favor of
the plan to form a student branch at
Michigan. Letters were received yes-
terday by Prof. W. T. Fishleigh, head
of the automobile engineering depart-
ment, commending the students on
their action and extending the co-
operation of the general society.
At the meeting to be held at 7:00
o'clock tonight in the engineering so-
ciety rooms, in the engineering build-
ing, plans will be made for the formal
application for the formation of the
branch, providing that the interest and
support exhibited at the meeting jus-
tifies this action. The constitution of
the student branch at Cornell has
been received and will be read and
discussed. The general society has
also forwarded their constitution and
it will receive like discussion.
It is pointed out that every student
on the campus is eligible for member-
ship and that the meetings and dis-*
cussions will be of such a nature as
to interest every one. Round-table dis-
cussions of the "advantages and dis-
advantages of twin-sixes" with an en-
gineer of the company represented
leading the discussion, or "what is the
best car to buy?" are discussions,that
are aimed to interest the engineer, the
lit and the law.
ALL READY FOR UNION DINNER
Close to 200 Members Will Dine at
Club House Tomorrow
Members of the Union will be given
an opportunity of relief from their
regular board tomorrow by a steak
dinner to be held at the Union at 6:00
o'clock. Wallace F. Reed, '16, is
working hard to make the affair a
success and indications are that it will
be the most successful membership
dinner ever given by the Union.
Two hundred tickets for the dinner
at 50 cents, were put on sale last
week in charge of Alvin M. Bentley,
'16, and are nearly all sold.
Yost Makes Flying Trip to Michigan
Coach Fielding H. Yost showed up
yesterday, and will leave again this
morning for his home in the south.
He was expected to go there direct
from West Point, where he has been
helping to polish off the Army team.
It is rumored that he is secQuting for
prospects for the coming year.
D. S. Ward Dismissed from Hospital
Donald S. Ward, '19E, who was for
a time confined to the Homeopathic
hospital suffering with an attack of
frontal sinusitis, has been dismissed
from the care of the hospital.

GERMVANY RU SING"
GTO MEET ATTAC
IN BALKN REG ION'
LONDON DOES NOT THINK MEN OF
KAISER UNPREPARED FOR
ALLIED DRIVE
RIOTING IN BERLIN RUMORED
Italian Re-enforcements Hurled at
Strategic Bridge Near
Gorizia
London, Nov. 29.-Germany is rush-
ing preparations to meet all of the
real attacks that she has been ex-
pecting in the Balkans.
From all indications the Russian
army of 350,000 is about to strike in
Bulgaria and the army of King Fer-
dinand of Rumania will join the
Czar's troops. It is not believed here
that the Germans are unprepared.
They have taken advantage of the
inability of the Allies to act at once
and have put out of the way the form-
idable Serbian army which was rush-
ing to Rumania and the joining of
which ivith the Anglo-French forces
would have made the Bulgarian cam-
paign impossible.
Attacks at Gorizia Fall
Vienna (via London), Nov. 29.-
Fresh Italian re-enforcements have
been hurled at the strategic - bridge
at Gorizia. The new battle continues,
despite heavy losses for the foe.
Their attacks have failed.,.
. Germans Driven Back
Paris, Nov. 29.-The war office an-
nounces toight that the German for-
ces which occupied the territory north
of Labyrinth coming up yesterday,
have been driven back with consider--
able losses. Yesterday an aeroplane
was forced to run in front of the Ger-
man position near the Meuse but by
great luck was able to rise again and
sail back to the French lines.
Women Demand Husbands
London, Nov. 29.-Reuter's Amster-
dam correspondent says:
"The Telegraff has informed us on
good authority that serious rioting
took place last Saturday in Berlin in
which several women stood before
the Imperial capital and demanded
the return of their husbands from the
front and an improvement in food
conditions. The crowd was finally
dispersed by the police."
GERMANS SEEK TO COMMENCE
REVOLUTION AMONG HINDUSI
Report Says That Organization Works
to Make Trouble For
British Rule
New York, Nov. 29.-Germans are
reported to be fostering a movement
in this country to start a revolution
in India.
The organization comprises chiefly
natives of India who are highly edu-
cated, and a number of well educated
Americans. A few Germans have done
their utmost with money and encour-
agement to invite the Hindus to start
trouble in India by secret correspond-
ence with Asiatics here.
This organization is thought to have
been founded on the Pacific coast
where the Hindus have worked since
1913 with the aim of starting a revo-
lution in India in 1917 to commemo-

rate the diamond jubilee of the mutiny
of 1857.
The natives of India who are in this
country have taken extra steps, it is
said, to encourage the revolution here.
Thus far their efforts have been in
vain.
Prof. Aigler to Address Junior Laws
Junior laws will hold a smoker at
the Union at 7:30 o'clock tonight, at
which Prof. Ralph W. Aigler will be
the principal speaker. W. C. Achi will
render several ukelele numbers, fea-
turing native Hawaiian melodies.

First Meeting Attracts 28 Writers;
Music to Be Submitted by
December 13.
W. A. P. JOHN WRITES LYRICS
The Union Opera for 1916 is well
under way! When 28 musical writers
attended the first meeting held yes-
terday by the opera committee for
contributions, which is more than
ever attended a like meeting in all the
history of Union operas, it is a safe
guess that this year's opera will have
some of the best lyrics that have ever
been offered.
According to those in charge, more
interest is being shown this year by
student musical writers than there has
ever been before. W. A. P. John, '16,
author of the lyrics, was present at
the meeting and read the lyrics to
the men. The men who intend to
write music for the lyrics are to have
their work handed in to Theron D.
Weaver, '16E, by the evening of De-
cember 13.
TO APPOINT BROOKLYN MAN TO
ARCHBISHOPRIC OF CHICAGO
Washington, Nov. 29.-Announce-
ment was made tonight by the Papal.
Legation that at the next consistory
the Pope would appoint the Rt. Rev.
William Mundelein, Bishop of Brook-
lyn, Archbishop of Chicago. It was
also announced that Rev. Ferdinand
Droff art, of Covington, Ky., would be
appointed Bishop of Covington.

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

k

r

.1

Normal Concert Course
Ypsilanti, Wednesday, Dec. 1
8:00 P. M.
Philadelphia Orchestra-85 Musiciaps-Leopold Stokowski, Conductor
Vorstiel-"Die Meistersinger",..:.....................,.wagner
Waldweben-"Siegfried" W...... .............s.wagner
Piano Concerto in R Fl'at.*................iz
Mrs. Baskerville
Symphony, No. 4, in F .........................Tschaikowsky
Tickets at Box Office, $1.50
Interburban Special Leaves Ann Arbor at 7:05 P. M.

TODAY.
Straw vote on military plan, 12:30 to
2:30 o'clock.
Northwestern club meets, Union, 7:30
o'clock.
Fresh Lit indoor baseball practice, Wa-
terman gym., 7:15 o'clock.
Soph enginers indoor baseball prac-
tice, Waterman gym, 7:15 o'clock.
TOMORROW.
Public students' recital, School of Mu-
sic, 4:15 o'clock.
Fresh mandolin tryouts, 205 N. W.,
8:00 o'clock.
Alpha Nu meets, Alpha Nu rooms, 7:30
o'clock.
Adelphi meets, Adelphi rooms, 7:30
o'clock.
Dr. E. Huntington speaks, Science
building, 8:00 o'clock.
Catholic Study Club meets at K. of C.
parlors, 7:30, Wednesday evening.

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* * * * * * * * * *
Ad W. Riter says:-
Mr. Student: Are you mal
ing the best of the opportunitie
offered you by members of th
Advertisers' Club? Have yc
read the' ads this morning?
* * * * * * * * -* * *

1' '

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