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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 28, 1915 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rHE MICHIGAN DAILr.

...

_________________________________________r

The Fact Thati

I

4.a_ d,

are frequently worn for two and more seasons by most particular

men, is not men-
tioned as unusual,
but is significant
as characteristic
of the service and

satisfaction found
in tailoring
Suits and
Overcoats
$16.00 to $34.00

I i r ''"s '

T HIS season's style demands
form-fitting clothes. That
makes it absolutely necessary that
experts work on your suit from the
start. And of course, you require
all wool materials, in your choice
of shade, fabric, and cut.
You'll get just what you want
at The Big Store.

YOUR SUIT

FASHION PARK
ADLER-ROCHESTER
CLOTHCRAFT
$15 to, $35'

Ue.Stela-Moeb Co., 19i.
LINDENSCHMITT APFEL & CO., Main St.

]&oyaiTa3,il*ored
CLOTH ES
1$005.00
$lA~to -3
Call and Lbok over our Special at $22.00, any style
CAM U O308 So.
AMP US OOT ER Y state St.
THE E BERBACH ( SON COMPANY
Scientific Apparatus, Chemicals and Student Laboratory Supplies
for Biology, Histology, Bacteriology, Pathology, and Anatomy
THE EBERBACH (4. ON CO. 200-208 E. Liberty St.

r
No Drops
Needed in Oure
Eve Examination.
.My s p e c i a l t y is making
Drugless Eye Examinations-
determining scientifically and"
accurately the glasses your eyes
require.
Shop facilities enable me to
make your glasses, giving yous
quick service. E F SES
We grind lenses.

EMIL H. ARNOLD
Optometrist-Optician
with Arnold & Co., Jewelers, 220 S. Main St

The

Lindermuslin
Sale
now running is extraord4ary
in qualities, fashions, reduc-
tions and is very comprehen-
sive.

ILOiy rad Pize
lei hesiAwarcl)
.twen to ,ยข
D}ionlaries -
at the Panama-
Pacific ExposilioR
was gronfedfo
WEBSTER'S
NEW INTERNATIONAL
For Superiority of Educational Merit.
__This new creation answers with final a~u
thority all kinds of puzzling questions such
as "How is Przemysl pronounced?" "Where
isFlcmders?" "What is a continuous voyage5
"What is a howitzer?" "Whatiswhitecoal?"
and thousands of others.
More than 400,000 Vocabulary Terms. 30,000
Geographical Subjects. 12,000 Biographical
Entries. Over 6000 Illustrations. 2700 Pages.
The only dictionary with the divided page-a
stroke of genius. REGULAR and
INDIA -PAPER
EDITIONS.
Write for specs
- t men pags, it
lustrations ,etc
Free, a set of
et Maps if
yourname this_
ry' - rJ {paper.
MERRIAM CO.,
Sprinsfield, Mass.
Students, for the most safe, speedy,
reliable economical Parcel and Mes-
senger service, call 2028. nov3tf

EXPEDIENCY OF ACADEMIC
CALL TO ARMS SCORED
BY DEANLLOYD IN N.Y. TIMES
(Continued from Page T)
their country in time of need? And
thirdly: If such training be not the
best way and yet be undertaken, will
it interfere either with whatever may
be their special and more legitimate
service or with the success of the
training provided by other and more
fitting agencies, by the Federal Gov-
ernment, for example, or by the State
Governments? These three questions,
7b iously not easily kept apart, will
be considered here in order.
Answers the First
As to the first question, colleges and
universities are often charged with
inertia, conservatism, lack of vigor.
Professors have been dubbed "the
third sex" with anything but intent
of flattery. Students have been said
after graduation to need several years
for convalescence before they can be
of real use in actual life. Such crit-
icisms, however, while often having
point, are in general either justly ap-
plicable only in exceptional cases or
inspired by some serious misconcep-
tion, being made under some wholly
wrong or some much distorted notion
of what a university's normal and
legitimate purpose it. Thus a univer-
sity's legitimate purpose certainly is
not to foster and propagate any given
religious creed or political platform or
the program of any of the vested in-
terests of society whatsoever; so that,
measured by such support, it may
well seem given to inactivity and gen-
eral debility. But of few institutions
can the condition be really so deplor-
able, for, as is matter of common ob-
servation, if the "practical" members
of society complain of the university's
inaction, they complain also with quite
as much vehemence of the univer-
sity's radicalism in economics, poli-
tics, and religion.
Bold in Thought
Slow in action, the university is
nevertheless bold in thought. Thus,
to suggest a simple sum of the whole
matter, being checked by progressive,
often radical, views from entering in-
to the ordinary routine of affairs, it is
also under restraint from fear of
ideas, so that it gets from all sides,
from conservatives and radicals alike,
the charge of academic idleness and
feebleness. Yet, in the meaning with
which this charge comes, no charge
were ever more unjust. To forget
the exceptions, the mistakes and the
lapses, back of the "academic idle-
ness" there is, demanding a candid
reckoning, the spirit of free investi-
gation and bold speculation. Remem-
bering this, and remembering, too,
what may be called the eventual ac-
tion-value of knowledge and vision,
who can say of the country's educa-
tional institutions that they have been
lacking in initiative and vigor?
Academic Idleness No Disease
Nor is it true that, in any serious
degree, academic idleness is a disease
requiring a long period of convales-
cence. Out in the world, away from
yard or campus, university men have
certainly given a most creditable ac-
count of themselves in all depart-
(Continued on Page 6)
In future all cars stop at Goodyear's
Drug Store. t
OVERCOATS
and rain coats from the House o
Kuppenheimer, on ;sale by N. F. Al"
Co., Main street. oct6eod-wed
i. pnemr nsaeb .F I~

a,

"THE LITTLE SCHOOLMASTER SAYS":
For the benefit of those who de-
sire the "latest wrinkle" in clothes
made from the newest designs in
fine woolens, I maintain a first-
class
CUSTOM TAILORING DEPARTMENT
in which all orders are satisfac-
torily filled by ED. V. PRICE &
CO., largest tailors in the world of
GOOD made-to-order clothes.
..My prices are astonishingly low..
-- -
i /

COME IN

Reule, Conlin & Fiegel
THE BIG STORE 200-202 Main Street

PAY $20 OR $25
Get your full money's worth
TOM CORBETT

116 E. Liberty

Young Men's Clothier

mas

If You Had a Mvillion But

POP. MAT.
WEDNESDAY'
Eest Seats $x
SAT. MAT.
a~c to $1.50

GRRICK
DETROIT

Week Nov. 29
NIGHTS
25C to $2

No use discussing that-there are so few people
who ever get to be rich as that-at the same
time you can wear a FITFORM suit and be as
well dressed as if you had a big lot of money.
You have the choice of a variety of FITFORM
models. You can get the one, two or three-
button coat. The advantage to you is that the
suit is a good looking one-whatever the model.
Some of the coats have the three buttons close
together. It gives a different style appearance.
No coat we have ever seen except FITFORM
gives the wearer so good an appearance as
when the top button of the coat is open. It
shows more of the vest.
FITFORI vests have lapels the same as the
coat-some with flaps-others with flaps and
tucks-all of them with the athletic cut--some
open a trifle in front at bottom-others pointed
-some cut out on the side but all as important
in appearance as the coat.
Plaids are in style-some large-some small-
pronounced or faint; plain colors, and then
you can have a stripe. Whatever pattern or
fabric FITFORM is in the lead.

Exclusive Local Dealer

309 S. Main

814 S. State1

The famous Wol. Martin
and Ami-french brands
are included complete..

OIr
I"'
''151 L0N0 MEN

(Second Floor)

I414

HEALTH SERVICE
WORK IS OUTLINE1I
(Continued from Page 4)
advised to have the defect remedied
at once.
If a contagious disease finds its
way into the Health Service, the one
suffering is at once sent to the Con-
tagious Hospital and there put under
strict surveillance, while others that
he has exposed are watched and told
to appear for an examination at the
first sign or symptom. This method
has proved very successful in a num-
ber of instances and has in all prob-
ability kept down several severe epi-
demics among the students.
During the year it is the aim of the
men in charge of the Health Service
to make an examination of all stu-
dents who suspect tuberculosis. Any
one coming to the offices with a com-
plaint suspicious of any lung trouble
is given an examination, and if any
sign is found he is referred for an X-
ray and a specimen of his sputum is
examined by a competent pathologist.
During the past week all fraternity
houses, men's clubs and other organ-
izations have been inspected by some
one under the direction of the Health
Service and all unsanitary findings
have been reported and advice given
as to the best way to maintain and
improve the health of occupants of
these organizations.
Each year just at the beginning of
the canoeing season lessons in the re-
suscitation of apparently drowned

OF COURSE YOU WILL BE IN LINE
THE BIG MUSICAL REVIEW, MADE FOR CHICAGO, BOUND HERE
BE SURE TO GET IN THE FRONT ROW, SEE. JUST A TIP
ENJOY THE MERRY WHIRL OF GIRLS, FRESH AND YOUTHFUL
FUNMAKERS, SONG, DANCE AND NOVELTY IN
"WITHIN THE LOOP"
2 ACTS AND 8 SCENES-34 MUSICAL NUMBERS
Idea by Joseph W. Herbert. Book by Dave Lewis and Ballard Macdonald.
Music by Harry Carroll.
125 Picked Principals and Chorus 125
Dave Lewis, Frances Kennedy, Anna Wheaton, Robert E. Keane, Harry Carroll,
Luella Gear, Eddie Coe, Bobby Watson, Gilbert Gregory, Henry Coote, Muriel Win-
dow, Mercedes Florenz, James Duffy.
Garrick Week of December 6
MAIL ORDERS NOW
The One Big Dramatie Sensation of this Generation
Written by GEO. V. HOBART
The Most Wonderful Play in America
The Story of Youth Going into the World, and the Temptations He Meets
Direct from 4 Months in New oYrk, and 3 months in Boston.
E X P E R I E N C E
NOTE THESE PRICES
For Best Seats, Evenings and Saturday Matinee, $zSo.
For Best Seats at Wednesday Matinee, $i.oo

WANTED
WANTED-To do tutoring in French
by native French teacher. Rates
moderate. 723 S. Thayer. Phone
1471-M. Nov.25-28. Dec.3-7
WANTED - A law student who has
some extra time and wishes to de-
vote it to work in a law office for
the benefit he can derive from the
work. Must be able to operate a
typewriter. Frank & Jones, Room
21, Ann Arbor Savings Bank block.
MISCELLANEOUS
Good board at private home. Lim-
ited number; five dollars per week.
Mrs. B. Markham, 1120 Oakland.
Phone 1561-M. nov.27-28

LOST
LOST-Gray sweater coat on South
Ferry field Thursday morning.
Finder please call H. D. K.-909.
nov27-28
LOST-Log slide rule. Name and ad-
dress inside case. Finder leave at
Daily office or address on case. Re-
ward. nov.28
FOR RENT
FOR RENT--Three fine office rooms,
suitable for a doctor or dentist; all
piped and wired; guaranteed steam
heat. 1713-MOR, 1661-J. J. K. Mal-
colm. nov16tf
FOR RENT-Large room, with dress-
ing room. All modern conveniences.
548 Church St. Phone 1594.

persons are given in hopes of being
able to lower the number of fatalities
which occur on the Huron river during
the spring and summer months.
The interest shown in the past and
the manner in which the men and
women of the university are endeav-
oring to carry out the plans and ad-
vice given to their representatives at
the meetings held by the Health. Serv-
ice officials show that the institution
has proved to be entirely a success
and a great aid to thetlarge number
of students who have at some time or
other become ill or injured while in
the university.

hOME BUILDING
BOOK PUBLISI
(Continued from Page 4)
cording to American ideas of light
comfort.
"The tenacity of old conditions
shown by the growing use of half
bered design. At the opposite
treme is the costly stone house, c
reminiscent of old European citif
Of far the greatest importanc
the builder and owner of today
the setting and outlook of the h
Americans have but -recently awa
ed to the beauty of their native
est trees, of large and small la
of the slight slope of a hillside or
more costly charm of a garden :
The landscape designer and the a
itecture work hand in hand, the b
taking its tone from the surrour
country as well as from the ow
personal taste. Gardens, orch
.terraces, sunken courts-all ar
much a part of the country hon
the porch or living-room.

wmm
mmm

-

m

Possibilities of The "Ukulele"

It can accompany the most difficult music written,
as well as the simpler gems.
To Any One Learning.
The pleasure derived from the Ukulele in a few
weeks' tuition far excels that of any other instrument.
WE ARE STATE AGENTS FOR THE GENUINE
GRINNELL BROS. MUSIC HOUSE
116 S. Main St. COMPETENT INSTRUCTORS. UKULELES FROM.$6.00 UP. Phone 1707

Martin guitars, mandolins, ukeleles
and all musical instruments at Schae-
berle & Son's Music House, 110 South
Main street. oct8tf

I
Al,

The McCain
two at tables.

House has places for
614 Monroe.
nov.28-30 dec.1

Portraits of merit. Make
pointment for a sitting at
studio. 619 E. Liberty St.
. Nov 28,

an ap~
Hoppe's
30, decl

v nov.28-3U

...
.

..........

..

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xA

imuxolhwm-

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