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November 28, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-28

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TE DAILY
NEWS THE $2.00 A I
NEWO"OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

The

Michigai1

wily

Phones :--Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL XXVI. No. 48. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1915. PRICE FIVE CENTS

PLAN N SEND REPRESENTATIES FROM
16 AMERIIC NTUNIVERSITIESONFORD
PEACEISSION TOEND GREATCONFLICT
with any foreign government or its
REBECCA SHELLY, '10, SECRETARY representatives, without the authori-
TO MME. SCHWIMMER, ANNOUNC- zation of the United States govern-
ES MILLIONAIRE'S PROJECT. ment, in any dispute or controversy
connected with the United States, is

TUESDAY'S VOTE TO
DECIDE MILITARY
DRILL QUESTION
TUN BO)Y ASKED TO VOTE
EITI! ER FOR OR AGAINST COYI.
FSORYE TRAINING.
FOURTEEN CHOSEN AS TELLERS

XPEIENC F ACADEMIC CALL TO
ARMS SODED BY DEAN LLOYD; CAN
AID U. S. WITHOUT TRAINING, HE SAYS

MICHIGAN ON LIST
Telegranus Will Be Received by Presi-
dents of Institutions Requesting
Them to Choose Delegates.
YOUNG PEOPLE TOBRING PEACE

IDo Not Expect Failure in'First Meet-
ing; Expedition Said to Be
Legal.
"One representative from each of
16 American universities and colleges
will be on the steamer Oscar 11, when
she leaves December 4 on her mission
of peace, if the presidents of these
institutions cooperate with Henry
Ford." Michigan will be among the
.16 colleges chosen.
This unexpected statement was made
by Miss Rebecca Shelly, '10, private
secretary to the Hungarian pacifist,
Mme. Rosika Schwimmer, at the New-
berry residence in Ann Arbor on Sat-
urday.
"Telegrams signed by Mr. Ford will
be received by the heads of the vari-
ous institutions chosen either on Mon-
day or Tuesday," she continue(I.
"These will embody a request that
the president, acting with the faculty
and ,he student organizations, choose
a delegate. A man accepting this po-
sition must be prominent, not only
through his personality, but also
through his scholastic ability."
Will Pay All Expenses.
"The representative chosen will be
regarded as the recipient of a travel-
ing scholarship. All his expenses will
be paid, of course, and he will be
expected to take an active interest in
all that may happen. Upon his return
to America, he must put in thesis form
what he has learned during his jour-
ney.
Older Citizens Too Conservative.
"The young people must be trusted
to bring about peace," declared Miss
Shelly. "The older citizens are tooI
conservative. They do not approve ofd
the cooperation of the younger ele-I
ment in this movement as a general
thing, but to me it seems that these
people who in 20 years will have
the welfare of this nation in hand,J
should have a place in this propa-
ganda.

liable to arrest.
"Since there is no official relatior
of the United States government t
this plan, we are not bound by thi
law. Why, if the law did cover suc
a case, Miss Addams would alread
be under indictment, for she has in-
terceded in the cause of peace again
and again."
RICHARDS SPEAKS
ATf U-HALLMEETING
Prominent Boston Pastor Takes for
Subject, "The Marks of
a MaIn"
TO BE ONE OF BEST SPEAKERS
Under the auspices of the Y. M. C.
A., James Austin Richards, pastor of
Mount Vernon church, Boston, will
speak in University hall this evening
at 6:30 o'clock. His subject will be
"The Marks of a Man."
That the lecture will be an interest-
ing one is shown by the following let-
ter received by W. H. Tinker, general
secretary of the "Y," in reply to re-
quests for information concerning the
personal history of the speaker. Mr.
Richards says:
"Dear Tink:-.
"Your requests are not the attack on
mi modesty they might be, for there
is nothing to report. I have a pic-
torial disguise which I will try to
mail you. As to my personal history
and characteristics--I was born some
time in the last century. I have the
usual number of fingers and toes. I
eat food and drink water, and wear
colars, shoes, etc.
"I fooled Harvard University enough
to induce them to give me a degree i'
1900, with the slight additions of cmi
laude, and honorable mention in philo-
sophy. The last was chiefly because
I did not know any.
"My chief official connection in Bos-
ton is to my family, and that is the
only interesting story I have. I am
the humble minister of Mount Vernoai
church. I am director of the Congre-
gational Education society, and have
for the last two years been trying to
find out what it is all about. My club
connections are somewhat numerous,
but none of them prominent, and al-
most all of them professional.
"I vote the Republican ticket when
the party is decent enough to let me,
and another ticket at other times. I
am not a suffragette. I am absolutely
neutral in the present war-not car-
ing a d--n who licks' the Germans.
I have run a Ford automobile 4,500
miles and have not killed anybody,
etc.; etc.
Faithfully yours,
"JIM."
Mr. Richards is one of the big speak-
ers, being brought here for the "Y"
series of Sunday night meetings. The
address will begin promptly at 6:30
o'clock and will close in time not to
conflict with regular church services.
RIDICULE FORD'S PEACE IDEA
London Papers Fire Shafts of Wit at
So-Called "Advertising
Scheme"
London, Nov. 27 - "An advertising
scheme,"'is the concise expression of
English opinion on Henry Ford's pro-
jected peace cruise. Ford's efforts to
end the war are not resented, but ridi-
culed, and the millionaire's sincerity
is doubted.
In bold headlines, The London Tele-

graph calls the proposed expedition
"Ford's Atlantic Joy Ride." "Ford
Cranks," reads a headline in the Lon-
don Sketch. A man high in official
life calls it "the silliest idea." "Ford
is simply an adroit advertiser," said
another. The Standard calls it a
"Pro-German Peace Cruise," and fol-
lows this' with the suggestion that
Bryan should be offered a job as first
mate.

With the announcement of the tell
ers by Francis T. Mack, '16E, all de.
tails are now completed for th
straw ballot that is to be taken or
the military training question froir
12:30 to 2:30 Tuesday noon.
Following are the men who will
act as tellers: Law building, Henry
Rummel, '16L, Grant L. Cook, '17L;
University hall, Russel Collins, '16
Farl E. Parlee '17, Harry Carlsoi,
-7, H. C. L. Jackson, '18; Engineer-
ing building, Thomas Soddy, '16E
Harry Buell, '16E, Maurice Nicho11,,
'17E, W.' Starrett Dinwiddie, '18E;
Library, Harold Smith, '16, Gerveys
Grylls, '17; Medical building, Wi-onr
M. Schafer, '16, Howard Muzzy, '17.
There will be two ballot boxes in
University hall, one in the Law build-
ing, one in the library, one in the
Medical building, and two in the En-
gineering buildng. Each person, when
balloting, will be asked to sign his
name to a separate sheet of paper in
order to prevent duplicating. Te
pharmacy students will find it to their
advantage to vote in the Medical ibui
ing. The women have been given a
special ballot box in the library.
'a he ballot will be headed "Military
Training Straw Ballot." The voter
will be asked to declare either "I
favor compulsory military training,"
or "I do not favor compulsory mii-
Lary training." It is not to be a ques-
tion of the student's attitude upon
voluntary training, but upon the pro-
1 al of the university senate which
will be acted upon by the regents DHX-
cember 1.
The question of compulsory military
i aining in colleges is receiving mch
attention at present, both upon the
crmpus and abroad. David Starr Jor-
Jan, when asked what he thought of
military sciences as taught in Ameri-
can universities, said: "I think it is
a poor substitute for gymnasium work
and is of absolutely no benefit." And
yet the old, classical, conservative col-
lege of Williams has recently started
military training. This is probably
the first successful attempt to solve
the question of preparedness in our
colleges.
In order to put the question in com-
pact form before the students, F. V.
Slocum, '15-'18L, who recently con-
tributed an article upon the subject,
will sum up in Tuesday morning's
Daily ali the arguments for the es-
tablishment of compulsory drill, and
in the same issue, Leland E. Crossman,
grad., will present the arguments
against the proposed plan.
RABBI SIMON SPEAKS TONIGHT
Jewish Students to Hear Lecturer of
Last Summer Session
"The Incomparable God," will be
the subject of a sermon to be deliver-
ed by Rabbi Abram Simon, of Wash-
ington, D. C., before the members of
the Jewish Students' Congregation at
6:45 o'clock tonight in Newberry
hall.
Rabbi Simon, who is prominent in
Washington civic affairs, is a member
of the board of directors of the Jewish
Chatauqua society and is also treas-
urer of the Central Conference of
American Rabbis. During the summer
session of college last year, Rabbi
4imon delivered a series of three
le'ctures on "The History of Jewish
Education."

JAN3WE AUSTIN RIARDS,
Pastor of the :Mount Vernon Church,
Roston, Who il Ileh Today's y"
Speaker at 6:30 lock in U-Hall.

F. V. Slocum and L. E. Crossman
Argue Question Further
in "Daiily:'

to

ALLIES COERCION
:MAY CAUSE GREEK
OPPOSITION INMAR
FRENCH TROOPS IN SERBIA FALL
S BACK AFTER SERB JUNCTION
E FAILS
ITALIANS GAIN IN ISONZO
German D~ash in Argonne Foiled in
Spite of Posonl Gas
Strategy
LONDON, Nov. 27.-A despatch from
Athens says the entente minister to-
day handed the Greeks a note demand-
ing the liberty of action of the Franco-
ism has given way to skepticism, and
Greek opposition may result. Aft-
er the receipt of the note, the premier
conferred with King Constantine and
then called a cabinet meeting.
The measures demanded by the en-
tente ministers are such as are re-
garded by the powers as indispens-
able for the security and freedom of
action of the allied troops.
French In Serbia Fall Back.
LONDON, Nov. 27.-The French
forces in southeastern Serbia, aban-
doning hope of making a junction with
the retreating Serbians, have given up
the west branch of the Cerna river
and have withdrawn to the right
bank. This means also the evacua-
tion of the position on the Rajec river,
a tributary flowing into the Cerna
from the west, north of Cronozo,
where the French forces have been
holding positions in the face of heavy
Bulgarian attacks, while waiting for
an expected junction with the Serb-
ians.
At the same time despatches from
agents announce that the Serbians
have retaken Krufezo, 16 miles west
of Prilet. The taking of Krufezo
seems to show that the Serbians are
still able to protect Monastir, 25 miles
to the south, and that they possibly
may be able to work east to Prilet.
Italians Sweep Peaks.
ROME, Nov. 27.-The official report
issued here today recounted Italian
successes on the Isonzo, and about
Gorizia. The Italians have, accord-
ing to the official statement, occupied
the entire zone of Monte Nero. It is
presumed that this means the reduc-
tion of all the formidable peaks
against which the army of General
Cadorna has been throwing its entire
strength for five months.
PARIS, Nov. 27.-The Germans, us-
ing suffocating gas, made an attack
in the Argonne yesterday, but were
completely repulsed. The attack was
begun with a wave of suffocating gases
followed by a second and third.
DETROIT, Nov. 27.-Announcement
was made today that Charles L. Freer
is to erect a million-dollar building in
the Smithsonian Institution which will
house the art collection he is to give
that institution. Mr. Freer is widely

FACULTY NIGHTS WILL
COMMENCE POl TUESDA1
Purpose of leetii ;) Further Ae
quaitance Behvw en Teachers
j and Sturdenits.
Faculty nights at the Union which
were so popular last year, are to take
a still more prominent place among
campus activities this year. Russell
Collins, '16, manager of Union faculty
nights, has announced that the first
gathering of faculty and students will
take place next Tuesday night, from
7:30 to 9:00 o'clock, at the Union club-
house. The faculty of the history, fine
arts and English departments have
been invited to-Tuesday's meeting.
The purpose of the meeting is to
give an opportunity for faculty and
students to mix. Before the meetings
were started, many members of the
faculty expressed a desire that there
be created some means by which they
could become more intimately ac-
quainted with their students.
Faculty nights will be held during
the winter at intervals of a week or
two and different departments will be
invited each time so that before
spring all departments will have par-
ticipated in the meetings. The meet-
ing are to be very informal.

s
i
.,
"
t
1
1
y
1
i

f
i

Doubts the Sincerity of Approbation
of Military Ex-
perts.
The following article by Prof. Al-
fred 11. Lloyd, dean of the Graduate
School-of the University of Michigan,
appeared on the editorial page of the
New York limes, on Friday, Nov. 26:

lNNlN'TS iATf MILITIRAIN ING IS
YZ "N(lT1(e'N* (FCENTRAL
COVE iN ME NT' ALONE
PRAISESATTITUDE
lnt Universi' Part Is Scientific and
Sliould Seek to Impart Vision,
He Avers.
DEMANDS GOVERNMENT ACTION

known as a collector. His Whistlers
and oriental antiques are especially,
noteworthy.
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J., Nov. 27.-
Five murders, and the wiping out of a
family and their farm hands, were dis-
covered this evening in the farm house
of Samuel Weitman, 50 years old. The
house lies off the German road near
here, about three miles outside of this
state.
Another farm hand, apparently the
man who had killed the others, was
found dead with a revolver. The
dead are Mr. and Mrs. Weitman, who
were shot as they slept, their son-in-
law, David Kidner, and his wife, Beat-
rice, also two workmen whose names
are not known.
Amsterdam, Nov. 27.-The French
soldier whose confession to the Ger-
man military authorities led to the
arrest of Miss Edith Cavell, the Eiig-
lish nurse whom the Germans recent-
ly executed at Brussels, committed
suicide Thursday by hanging himself
in a military prison, according to ad-
vices from the Belgian capital today.
Philadelphia, Nov. 27.-Carl M.
Schwab has been elected a member of
the board of trustees of Cornell Uni-
versity. This fact was announced to-
day by H. W. Peters, secretary of the
university, in a resume of the college
year before committees of the board
of directors of the associate alumni,
at Bellevue.
Rutherford, N. J., Nov. 27.-Stricken
with ascending myelitis caused by a
hard knock at football or some
other game, George N. Platt, 13-year
old son of Mr. and Mrs. George F.
Platt, died last night. There was no
outward marks to indicate where the
boy had suffered injury.

Venture Not Official.
"This first venture is, however, not
official; we are the pioneers of the
voice of the people. We are opening
the way to an official attempt at
peace later on. The conference for
which the Oscar II is headed will be
probably held in Stockholm not later
than Christmas.
"This move may be unsuccessful,"
continued Miss Shelly. ,"Miss Jane
Addams expressed it wonderfully well
when she said that she wanted peo-
ple on this ship who were big enough
to fail for the sake of opening the
way for others.
"I do not believe that this first meet-
ing will be a failure. It may not ac-
complish the ultimate goal of world
peace, but at least it will open the
eyes of many to the absolute neces-
sity of it. We will try to end this
military epoch. Eventually the gov-
ernments will be awakened by our
movement, and then the matter will
become official and bring - about the
desired result."
Vassar Only Woman's College.
Miss Shelly expressed an ardent
hope that Michigan would be repre-
sented on the ship, since it is one
upon the list which includes Harvard,
Yale, Cornell, Columbia, Virginia, Tu-
lane, and other prominent institu-;
tions. Vassar is the only woman's
college to be represented.
"Questions regarding the legality of,
such a move as sending the ship have
been raised," Miss Shelly continued.9
"To my mind they have little or no;
weight. The faw which covers this
matter says, in brief, that any citi--
zen of the United States who carries1
on verbal or written correspondence

All over this country the great ques-
tion of the hour, preparation, is under
heated discussion, and here and there
discussion has led already to positive
action of one sort or another. Bound
not to be behind in their zeal and pa-
triotism, perhaps even bent on taking
the lead in something big-"just for
once," as some of the promoters with
an almost tragic pathos have chosen
to put it-the colleges and universi-
ties are discussing and enacting pro
grams of military training for their
undergraduates, to all intents and pur-
poses making a stated anlount of
such training an additional require-
ment for the baccalaureate degree.
The Senate of one of the leading State
universities, for example, the Univer-
sity of Michigan, by a large majority
and with much enthusiasm has re-
cently voted to recommend to the
Board of Regents that "compulsory
military training be introduced into
the university."
Shows Fine Spirit
In this academic call to arms there
is certainly a fine spirit, giving prom-
ise of something more. It shows not
only good purpose and patriotism,but
also real vigor, for to theory and senti-
ment it adds real action, action, too,
which-apart from the question of the
particular auspices under which it
may be undertaken-the country in
general is awakening to feel to be
wise. However much the need of
preparation may be regretted, what-
ever shock and disappointment the
people's better ideals have to suffer in
these days of the great war abroad
and the real or imaginary danger at
home, the need itself, as a demand of
prudence, seems to be felt at least by
most of the people. Civilization may
be suffering a serious setback, but
political and social differences are dis-
appearing before the common call.
What Part Shall They Play
On the assumption-that the coun-
t>-y must prepare, that it must pre-
pare for quick and effective defense,
on this assumption accepted for the
moment without regard to any pos-
sible right to a hearing for those
who either doubt the present danger
or belong moderately or radically
to the minority that favor a policy
of peace--on this assumption there
are certain very pertinent questions
in regard to the proper part of the
country's higher educational institu-
tions in the demanded preparation
which simply force themselves on the
attention of every thoughtful Amer-
ican citizen.
Action by fine impulse, such as has
been taken by the Ann Arbor Facul-
ties and as is contemplated elsewhere,
always means well. But however
zealous and patriotic, it does not al-
ways make, to speak to the present
case, in the wisest way for "quick
and effective defense..
The Three Questions
Perhaps the first of the questions,
which one has to ask, is this: Grant-
ed, of course easily granted, that ini-
tiative and vigor even in big things
are quite desirable at educational
institutions, have they been lacking
in the past, as some are pleased now
to. represent? Then, secondly, this
question: Is inilitary training the way,
or a way, in which with initiative and
vigor these institutions can best serve
(Continued on Page 5)

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
EDWARD A. STEINER,
AUTHOR, LECTURER, EDUCATOR
SUBJECT:
THE CHALLENGE OF THE MERCN SPIRIT
T4NIHTMvethodist Church TON730T.
a7:0at 7:30

- pTODAY.
Cosmopolitan - club meeting, Unit-
arian church, 3:00 o'clock.
Polonia club meeting, McMillan hall,
2:00 o'clock.
F. M. Butzel speaks to Menorah so-
ciety, Newberry hall, 7:45 o'clock.
TOMORROW.
Prof. T. West speaks on "Structure
of Metals," room 165, Chemical build-
ing, 7:30 o'clock.
Rev. Loring, "Materialism and the
Way Out," Unitarian church, 10:30
o'clock.
James A. Richards speaks, "Y"
U-hall meeting, 6:30 o'clock.
Dr. J. W. Cochran speaks, Presby-
terian church, 7:30 o'clock.
E. A. Steiner speaks, Methodist
church, 7:30 o'clock.-

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