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November 27, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-27

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THE DAILY
$2.00
NEW OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

The

M1'ich igan

Daly

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY TH
NEW YORK SUN

A

VOL. XXVI. No. 47.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER, 27, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENT

______________ .i _________________________________--------------______

MEXICANS SHOOT
2 UNIT E STATES
SOLDIERSINGFIGHT
EIGHT FALL WOUNDED AND TWO
DEAD AFTER EXCHANGE
OF SHOTS. M
BELIEVE CARRANZA MEN GUILTY
Twenty Mexicans Fall When Ameri-
can Troopers Reply With
Shower of Lead.
Nogales, Nov. 26.-Mexican soldiers
to the number of at least 20 were
killed in Nogales, Sonora, today by fire
of American troopers. Two American
troopers were killed and eight injured.
Whether the dead are Villa or Car-
ranza men is not known but they are
believed to have been Carranza men.
Following the evacution of Nogales,
Sonora, this morning early, by the
Villa forces, some stragglers from the
Villa army remained in the town loot-
ing and shooting their rifles at inter-
vals. About noon shots began to fall
on the American side of the line and
one American trooper was wounded.
The American soldiers, on orders
from their commander, Col. W. H. Sade,
Twelfth Infantry, returned the fire,
and six Mexicans were shot to death.
Then followed a rapid exchange of
shots from both sides of the line.
Colonel Cargenas, commander 'of
the advance guard of the Carraza
forces, had a conference on the inter-
national border with Colonel Sade and
assured him that the Carranzistas con-
trolled the situation in the Sonora
town.
TICKETS FOR WRIGHT PARTY
AT UNION PLACED ON SALE
Tickets for the first Wright Saxo-
phon party of the year have been
placed on sale. The dance will be
given Friday night from 9:00 until
2:00 o'clock at the Union, and Wright's
first trio will furnish the music. The
Union dining room will be open to the
guests. Tickets at $2 may be reserved
now by calling 236.
French War Loan Rapidly Subscribed
Paris, Nov. 26.-Subscriptions to
the French government's "Loan of
Victory" are exceeding all expecta-
tions. It is estimated, in financial cir-
cles 'that yesterday's total in Paris
aloneexceeded $5,000,000,000.
Dispatches from Marseilles, Lyons
and other provincial centers say that
the banks, postoffices and tax collec-
tors' offices were thronged all day yes-
terday with applicants in answer to
the appeal of the government.
OPERA MUSIC COMPOSERS
WiLL MEET THIS MORNING
General Chairman Weaver and Earl V.
Moore to Explain What
Is Wanted.
Everyone who aspires to be the
writer of music for this year's Union
opera will be at the Union at 10:00
o'clock this morning when the lyrics
and scenarios which have been writ-
ten will be given out to prospective
music scribes. The writers of the lyr-
ics will be on hand to give suggestions
as to the writing of the music.
It is rumored that many talented

music writers will show up this year
and will make the opera as successful
in this direction as it was last year
and two years ago.
Earl V. Moore, of the school of mu-
sic, who did so much to make the Un-
ion operas such big successes, will be
at the Union to explain just what is
wanted and will give the new men the
benefit of his experience. Theron D.
Weaver, '16E, general chairman of the
opera, will also be there to give the
men a start.
No director has been secured for this
year's opera as yet but Weaver is mak-
ingstrenuousefforts to secure one who
will put on a good show. A great deal
depends upon the director and a good
one is sure to make a success of the
undertaking even with poor material.
With the material expected this year
and an extra good director, it is hoped
this year's opera will stand among the
best ever turned out at Michigan.

Nab Kissing Kid
As Girls Escape

"Bold, Bad Man"' Proves
14 Year Old Disciple
King Cupid

Amorous
of

PRESENT NO TI
FOR US TO M
MOVEFOR I
WILSON THINKS U. S.
TAKE NO STEP NOW,
INTIMATED

'IME
9IKE
PEACEi
SHOULD
IT IS

I

pr io . J. C.
eimtle

Tunior Engineers
Smoke at Uuion

Parker Speaks on "The
Art of Letting One's
Face Slip"

"Little Billy the Kisser's" amorous
career came to a disastrous halt
Thursday night, when a policeman
caught him dodging among the shad-
ows on Ingalls street, between Cath-
erine and Kingsley, in his search for
some one who looked fairly "kiss-
able."
"Little Billy," who is William Tem-
ple, aged 14, has been conducting a
strenuous kissing and hugging cam-
paign during the last two weeks against
the young women and girls passing in
the vicinity of State, Thayer and In-
galls streets, north of the campus.
His plan of attack has been to charge
from a strategic position behind a
tree and smother his victim with car-
esses before she was aware of the at-
tack. Seven young women and girls,
one of them a university student, had
complained to the police that he had
thus forced his attentions upon them
before he was captured.
Kissing is like military training;
under the proper ceiditions it is a
good thing, but a lot of people object
to it when it's compulsory, and that
is why "Little Billy" will probably
be committed to the Boy's Reforma-
tory at Lansing by Probate Judge
Murray, in accordance with the appli-
cation which Chief of Police Pardon
will submit when the boy's case
comes up.
TAKE STRAW VOTE
ON MILITARY PLAN
Purpose of Ballot to Ascertain What
Position Student Body Takes
en Question
URGE WOMEN TO PARTICIPATE
"Let the regents know the sentiment
of the campus on the proposed pli
of compulsory military training" is
the slogan of those in charge of the
straw ballot that is to be taken on thi
proposition Tuesday noon between the
hours of 12:30 and 2:30.
The committee, which is headed by
Francis E. Mack, '16E, realizes that
the interest shown in the ballot will
determine its effect upon the regents.
As the number of votes cast will be an
index to the interest, it is imperative
that every student should vote either
for or against the proposed plan.
The women of the university will
not only be permitted but urged to
vote. The ballot box in the library,
though open to everyone, will be es-
pecially for them. The other boxes
will be in the Engineering building,
University hall, and the Medicine and
Pharmacy buildings.
Since the action of the university
senate on November 8, the question
of compulsory military training has
occasioned a lively debate on the
campus. The first meeting of the
Michigan Union Forum was devoted
to a discussion of the proposition, and
The Daily has printed numerous con-
tributions on both sides of the ques-
tion. It was to ascertain exactly the
consensus of opinion that The Daily
decided to hold a straw ballot.
Mack will finish arranging the de-
tails of the ballot today, and will an-
nounce the names of the tellers to-
morrow.
PRES. HUTCHINS GOES EAST
Will Attend Marriage of Son, H. C..
Hutchins, '03
President Harry B. Hutchins left

yesterday for New York, where after
attending to some business affairs at
Columbia University, he is to attend
the wedding of his son, H. C. Hutchins,
'03, to Miss Ella Louise Adams tonight
at the home of the bride's father in
Brooklyn.
Mr. Harry C. Hutchins, the son,
graduated from the College of Engi-
neering in '03 and since that time has
been with the municipal engineering
department in New York city.
President Hutchins will stop at Ith-
aca, N. Y., on his way home to attend.
to some University matters at Cor-'
nell.

PEACE SHIP SAILS DEC. 8

Ford Thinks iMajority of Powers
Not Object to His
Conference

Will

Washington, Nov. 26.-Washington
was the scene today of several devel-
opments in the movement "to get the
boys out of the trenches by Christ-
mas," in which Henry Ford and the
Women's Peace party are collaborat-
ing.
For one thing it was intimated defi-
nitely that President Wilson does not
believe the time opportune for the
American government to make a new
peace move. Mr. Ford announced that
he has in his possession assurances
from officials of a majority of the im-
portant powers on each side of the
European war that they have no ob-
jection to the assembling of a peace
conference: He declined to give out
tie names of these officials.
Mr. Ford also announced that he
will spend as many millions as are
needed in carrying on a propaganda
against war preparedness in this coun-
try and a bureau will be opened for
this purpose in Washington under the
direction of Oswald Garrison Villard,
of the New York Evening Post.
The peace ship which was scheduled
to sail December 4 will not sail until
December 8.' It is regarded by Mr.
Ford as altogether probable that ex-
Secretary Bryan will accompany the
peace expedition.
JAIL SEEMS IMMINENT
FORDYNAMITERS' HEAD

With plenty of cider, cigars, cigar-
ettes and digestible doughnuts, topped
with excellent music, the junior engi-
neers held their first smoker of the
year at the Union last night. Prof.
J. C. Parker, head of the electrical en-
gineering department, gave a talk
on "The Gentle Art of Letting One's
Face Slip," and Prof. E. E. Ware, of
the chemical engineering department,
on "Bookworms," both talks loosen-
ing up faces considerably.
Dean J. DeButts, 'SE, and C. H.
Cottington, '19, gave a piano and ban-
jo number, and E. K. Marshall, '17E,
Raymond G. Day, '17E, H. B. Bassett,
'17E, and C. B. Starring, '17E, showed
promising talent as a quartet. The
class orchestra finished up the musi-
cal program.
PLAN FORMATIN
.OF LOCAL SiAEL
Installation of Student Branch of
Society to be Considered
Tuesday
IETROIT MEN ARE INTERESTED
The formation at Michigan of a
general student branch of the Society
of Automobile Engineers will be con-
sidered at a meeting next Tuesday
at 7:00 o'clock in the engineering
society rooms in the engineering1
building. An increasing demand on
the part of the student body and an)
active interest not only on the part1
of the Detroit branch but of the na-
tional society has resulted in this step
being taken toward the formation of
the branch. Providing that active in-1
terest and support is shown at the
meeting, plans will be made for ap-
plication to the society for the forma-
tion of the branch.
The branch, if it is formed, is plan-1
ned to be open to the campus in gen-
eral and the meetings and discussions1
will be of such a nature as will ad-
mit of this membership. Any studentI
on the campus or member of the fac-
ulty will be eligible. .
Such men as Secretary Conant of]
the Detroit branch, Mr. K. W. Zim-
merschied, chairman standards com-
mittee of the S. A. E.., and Mr. Rus-
sell Huff, chief engineer of the Dodge
Co., and president of the S. A. E.,
have all expressed themselves as ac-)
tively interested in the formation of
a student branch at Ann Arbor. )
The general society has a student)
branch at Cornell and it is reported
that it is one of the strongest societies
on the campus. Both Purdue and
Worcester Polytechnic are consider-
ing the formation of a like branch.
FRENCH MINISTER OF FINANCE
ASKS $1,613,000,000 IN BILLI
Situation Holds Nothing Disquieting;
Can View Future With)
Confidence
Paris, Nov. 26.-A bill appropriating
$1,643,000,000 for the first quarter of
1916 was introduced today in the
Chamber of Deputies by Alexander
Ricot, Minister of Finance. In ex-
planation of the bill, M. Ricot said,
"The financial situation has nothing
disquieting in it when it is consider-
ed that we have met all demands-
heavy as they have been in the 16
months of war-without imposing new
burdens of taxation and without ex-
tension of credit.
"The Bank of France for the first
time has just opened negotiations for
a loan which with the national de-
fense bill will assure resources for
the ensuing months. We can con-

template the future with perfect con-
fidence."

UNIVERSITY PRIFESSORS
REPRESENT MICHIGAN T
SECURITYLEAGUE MEET
Name Prof. Hobbs, Dr. de Naerede,
Prof. Bigelow and Prof.
Bradshaw Delegates
PLAN MONSTER MASS MEETNG
FOR ALL PRESENT ON SUNDAY
CHICAGO BRANCH ENTERTAINS
VISITING MEMB11S AT
LUNCHEON
The Ann Arbor branch of the Na-
tional Security League will be repre-
sented by four members of the Uni-
versity faculty at the general con-
clave of that organization held today
in the LaSalle hotel, Chicago.
Prof. William H. Hobbs, chairman
of the delegate committee, Dr. Charles
B. G. de Nancrede, and Professor S.
Lawrence Bigelow left Friday, while
Professor John W. Bradshaw started
Wednesday.
Two important matters are to be
considered by this society. A dis-
cussion of the wisest course to pursue
towards the goal of military prepar-
edness ranks first, while the question
of whether or not to affiliate or even
combine with two or three other or-
ganizations will be decided.
At present there are in America four
leagues for the better protection of
the country. The Navy League, first
to be founded, insists upon a larger
navy; the Army League, desires the
army increased, while the American
Defense. Society has similar aims to
that of the National Security League.
A monster mass meeting will be
held in Chicago on Sunday at which
the representatives of these various
organizations will be present, and in
case they can come to an agreement,
they plan to work together in the
future.
can come to an agreement, they plan
to work together in the future.
Following a morning and an after-
noon session, the Chicago branch of
the League will tender a banquet to
the delegates. The professors plan to
leave the city on Sunday.
KAISER REFUSES WAR'S BLAME?
Report Says German Cardinal Carries
Teuton Views on Struggle
to Pope Benedict.
Rome, Nov. 26.-Cardinal Hartmann,
archbishop of Cologne, arrived in
Rome yesterday from Milan.
Reports are current here that he
brings an important message from
Kaiser to Pope Benedict in which the
German view of the war situation is
presented and in which the emperor is
said to have disclaimed responsibility
for the conflict, alleging that Germany
was only interested in self-defense.
MENACED PRESIDENT WILSON;
POLICE HALT TRIP TO CAPITAL.
Cleveland, 0., Nov. 26.-William
Meyer, who gave his address as Bay
City, Mich., was held by the police last
night pending an investigation by se-
cret service men into threats he has
made to kill President Wilson. The
Washington authorities have been no-
tified.
Meyer says he was on his way to the
capital when he was arrested. ,

HEAD OF BRITISH',
IFORCES SEEKS AID..
ATTALIANFRONT.
SECRECY OF WAR LORD'S MOVES
SHROUD VISIT IN
MYSTERY
ITALIANS LAND IN ALBANIA
French Forces in Serbia Score Easy
Victory-Capture Town of
Brousnik
Rome, Nov. 26.-Lord Kitchener al-
rived here today from Naples after
conferring with Premier Salandra and
the Italian war ministers. He prob-
ably will go to the fighting front to
meet King Victor Emmanuel. Kitch-
ener's movements have been kept so
secret that there was no intimation
that he intended to visit Italy.
In view of the Allies' anxiety to se-
cure Italian aid in the Balkan cam-
paign, the greatest importance is at-
tached to his visit here.
British Lose Heavily Near Bagdad
London, Nov. 26.-Turkish troops re-
sisting the British in Mesopotamis
have fallen back to within 10 miles
of Bagdad, after a desperate battle in
which the British losses were heavy,
says an official report issued tonight.
Italy Lands Troops in Albania
Petrograd, Nov. 26.-Information re-
ceived here from excellent sources
says Italy has begun landing troops
at Azlona in Albania.
French Gain Victory In Serbia
Paris, Nov. 26.-A victory for the
French forces in Serbia in an offen-
sive movement undertaken on Tues-
day last is reported in a despatch
from Saloniki. The French are said
to have captured the., town of .Brous-
nik, west of Kricolak.
Artillery Active in Argonne
Paris, Nov. 26.-A marked increase
in the activities of the artillery in the
Argonne is reported in. tonight's offi-
cial statement. The French destroy-
ed a munition department in this re-
gion. The same district was the scene
today of a gain of ground about La-
sille Morte. Heavy losses are report-
ed from the Vosges.
German Spirit Low
London, ,Nov. 26.-German prisoners
captured along the central sector of
the battle line in Russia give testi-
mony, says a report from Petrograd,
to the low spirit and discouragement
which their comrades are facing in
their winter quarters on Russian soil.
The attacks of the Russians, they say,
from time to time drive the Germans
from well established and comfortable
trenches established by the invaders.
RUSSIANS FLEE TOWARD EAST
Empire Faces Serious Problem Since
Military Powers Control Poland
London, Nov. 26.-Reports from Rus-
sia indicate that the empire is facing
a serious problem in the tide of migra-
tion to the east caused by the military
occupation of Poland and western Rus-
sia and the attendant ravages. The
number of such refugees is estimated
at 13,000,000. Already the Russian
government has spent 6,500,000 rubles

in an effort to care for them. Through
this continued migration rebellion is
feared.
So great was the movement of these
unhappy people of the devastated re-
gions that at certain periods it became
necessary to give up all available rail-
way trains to transport them. Passage
was furnished free.
J. P. -Norgan Co. Gets $10,000,000.
New York, Nov. 26.-Ten million
dollars in gold arrived today aboard
the steamship Baltic. It was con-
signed to I. P. Morgan & Co.

Others Face Arrest Charged With
to Destroy Pacific Coast
Docks.

PlotI

San Francisco, Nov. 26.-B. C. Crow-
ley, formerly a special investigator in
the county district attorney's office,
was taken into custody today by offi-
cers of the department of justice who
charge him with sending money to
further the destruction by dynamite
of vessels bearing munitions of war
and the destruction by fire and dyna-
mite of docks on the Pacific coast.
Others, it is hinted, face arrest. The
docks destroyed were those of the Blue
Funnel line at Seattle, where $1,000,-
000 worth of merchandise was burned.
The complaint set forth that Crowley
sent three money orders to a man
named Garrett at Tacoma and Seattle
on May 9 for $250, and two on June 4
for $50 each.
Special mention was made of the ex-
plosion of a barge at Seattle which
contained dynamite to be shipped to
Vladivostock.
BALLOON NEAR BE3IDJI
BELIEVED TO BE FIELDING'S
Bemidji, Minn., Nov. 26.-Dr. Fred-
erick J. Fielding of San Antonio, Tex.,
believes the balloon found by hunters
in this vicinity recently belongs to
him. In a letter received here today
from Dr. Fielding he says:
"I won the international balloon race
from Chicago in 1908, landing near
West Shefford, Quebec, July 5, 895
miles from the starting point. In land-
ing through an error of my aids the
basket was torn loose, we were left
on the ground and the bag rose to a
lofty height and was apparently mak-
ing a bee-line for the Atlantic ocean."

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION STS.
SUNDAY, 10:30 A. M.
LEONARD A. BARRETT speaks
Theme-"FATIGUE AND EFFICIENCY or MORAL OVERSTRAIN."
University Bible Classes at Noon

TODAY
Michigan Union dance, 9:00 o'clock.
Fresh lit indoor baseball practice,
Waterman gym, 9:30 o'clock.
Ferris Institute club entertains
Ypsi club; Unitarian church, 7:30
o'clock.
Senior engineer indoor baseball
meeting, Waterman gym, 7:15 o'clock.
Social for Christian Endeavor, Mc-
Millan hall, 8: 00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Rev. Loring, "Materialism and the
Way Out," Unitarian church, 10:30
o'clock.
James A. Richards speaks, "Y"
U-hall meeting, 6:30 o'clock.
Dr. J. W. Cochran speaks, Presby-
terian church, 7:30 o'clock.
E. A. Steiner speaks, Methodist
church, 7:30 o'clock.

*
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* * * * * * * * * * *
Ad W. Riter says-
Thanksgiving Day has come
and gone; the Fall is well spent;
Christmas time will soon be
here, and with it an enlivenment
in all lines of bushiess.
Mr. Merchant: You must plan
your Christmas advertising now.
The Daily is at your service.
* * * * * * * * * * *

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