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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 23, 1915 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIL f.

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COME ON

9I
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-gin"
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a; .

When you're out looking for your Winter
Oiercoatt, just pay this store a visit. We don't
ask you to favor us, but we do insist that you'll
regret slighting us.
There isn't a finer, smarter or complete
showing of Overcoats than ours in Town and
we'll show you prices that you can't beat any-
where.

It's time to get a good Scrap Book,
so well made that it will last all
your life. We have it.

Just Received Genuine
Hawaiian Ukuleles
Yep, unpacked the Hawaiian Bouncing Feas, or Ukuleles yes-
terday and have them all tuned up ready for your inspection.
They're blingers, boys, made of the real stuff, genuine Koa
wood, the native 1-Hawaiian wood you have heard so much about.
When you slide your fingers over the strings you get a sound
that is as sweet as a harp and as clear as a bell. You'll be delighted
when you have heard them and be glad that you put off buying when
you see them.
They are priced as high as two ten spots and as low as two fives.
SPECIAL OUTFIT
Genuine Ukulele, instruction book and case; a $15 value for
special price of $12.

$1075 up,

CALKINS'

PHARMACY

I

324 S. State Street

I

Wadhams & Co's Corner
MAIN STREET

! ..,
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.,49

Be
Attractively
Dressed
and gain the admiration of all
by having your next suit
Individually
CustomTailored
by
ARTHUR F, MARQUARDT
Campus Tailor
516 East William St. Phone 1422-J

f, 'GOT HIC"
ARROWR
FlNT FiTS CRAVAT KNOT
93PFCiY, 2 for 25c
c Ei. . P7A ODY 4 CO.. tiC., MAKERS

II
I

-

V AN'S
I Quality Shoe So

I

C OBBLING HERE

HE R E

SHOES PROPERLY REPAIRED
WHILE YQU HESITATE

I.nc ii ,v Shop.

1114 S. University

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a

ti

t uttion this
a Complete and
r i mentof

c

Rugs

b :tca nutil Thanks-
ii o 1 the irst Floor of
the 1' Ld i O Sore by

Here is YurAswer; in
WEBSTERS
EW INTERNATIONAL
ITHEMERPN AEBSTER -
Even as you read this publication you
likely question the raoanin of some_
eneword. Afriend a w " What makes
mortar hrden?" You seek the location
of Loch A'it rine or the pronunciation of L=
E jutsu. What is white coal? This NEW
CREA TION answers all kindsof ques-
tionsin Language, History Biography,
Fiction, Foreign Words, rades, Arts
Sand Sciences, witlh final authority.-
400,O00WordsandPhrases efined.
6000 Illustrations.'
SCost $400,000.
2700 Pages.
The only dictionary with
the new divided p~age,
characterized as "A
N troke of Genius."
Write for specimen pages,
illustrations, etc.
Mention ti ' '
-pblication i I+ Z xexz r r '< '
aand receive
E of pocket x/\ /~
MERRIAM \
Co., ~
springfield
Mass.

DISAGREES WITH HOBBS
E. 0. SNETHEN SAYS THAT U. S. IS
NOT IN ANY DANGER OF FOR-
EIGN INVASION.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
I would like to make public some of
the questions which arose at the For-
um and the answers to these questions
as I view them.
Professor Hobbs said that upon the
close of the war in Europe, Am rica
was likely to be invaded. He said the
German government had gone s far
as to have planned the best meth'd of
attack. In answer to this I say, there
is no war in sight, far less an invas-
ion into this country by European
forces. The war in Europe tolay is
fast exhausting all the forces of the
belligerent powers, and the end is not
yet. How many years the present war
will continue, no man can say, but it
is not at all probable that it will close
in the near future. After the war
clues cease, the nations will be so ex-
hausted and the fighting men will be
so tired of war, that they will not care
to enter another soon.
Another question that was 1 rought
up was that of patriotism. Pofessor
Hobbs said that he had spent several
y ars in Europe and had compared the
p-atriotism of those countries with that
of America, and that he felt ashamed
of the American spirit. He said that
European students felt the duty
they owed their country and were
anxious to serve her, that the Ameri-
can student should likewise be willing
to sacrifice his life for his state.
In answer to this, I would say that
I believe the war in Europe today is
largely due to this so-called "Patrinoi.
ism." Europe is war mad. If they
had held some of the saner views which
their cousins across the Atlantic had
held in regard to war, there would be
not war in Europe today. I believe in
the right kind of patriotism. I be-
ieve every student does owe something
to his state, but cannot he serve the
state in a far better way by using all
his time while in the University to get
the best possible education and then go
back home to his community and help
lift his neighbors to a higher plane of
living?
Patriotism can best be shown by
making your life work something
which will be useful to mankind, such
as healing the sick, championing the
wrongs of the distressed, relieving the
suffering of the poor and helping
some soul-sick brother to a better life.
I oppose compulsory military train-
ing in the university for another rea-
son. If Michigan would adopt this
plan, it would be setting an example
for other state institutions to do like-
wise. Michigan has so large an influ-
ence that her responsibility in this
matter is very great. If the state in-
stitutions throughout our land should
adopt this plan, we should soon have as
despicable a war regime built up in
this country as Germany has had. This
idea that preparedness for war causes
peace, exploded a few months ago
when military Europe broke out in
war. Germany, the best prepared of
all, was one of the first upon the scene.
David Starr Jordan says, "Prepared-
ness for war causes war. The result
in Europe today was caused by pre-
paredness."
I would like to close by giving Long-
fellow's idea, also by quoting from the
speech of Lord Roseberry of England
before the University of London on
November 16:

I-

camps and courts
Given to redeem the human mind from
error
There were no need of arsenals and
forts."
Lord Roseberry of England says, "I
know nothing more disheartening than
the announcement recently made that
the United States-the one great
country left in the world free from the
hideous, bloody, burden of war-is
planning toembark upon the build-
ing of a huge military system. It
means that the burden will continue
upon other nations and be increased
exactly in proportion that it is built
up in the United States. .I confess
that it is a disheartening prospect that
the United States, so remote from the
European conflict, should voluntarily
in these days take up the burden,
which after this war will be found to
have broken, or almost broken, our
backs."
After this conflict is over we will
be nearer than ever before the disarm-
ament of the whole world, the ideal
state. Shall the learned regents of
Michigan put one stone in the path of
this great Utopian movement of world-
wide peace?
E. 0. SNETHEN, '18L.
ORGANIZE "TEUTONS" ON CAMPUS
Problems of Germany in Present War
to be Discussed
Prof. Carl Huber, of the histology
department, and director of the ana-
tomical laboratory, has been elected
honorary member of The Teutons, a
new campus organization. The offi-
cers who have been elected are: Pres-
ident, Austin W. Heins, '17M, and vice-
presidentEugene F. Traub, '16. Prof.
J. A. C. Hildner, of the German de-
partment, made on informal talk on
German university life at the first
meeting.
The Teutons is different from the
Deutschtr Verein in that membership
is not limited to students of the liter-
ary department, and that instead of
considering German literature, the
club plans to discuss the social, polit-
ical, and economic problems of Ger-
many, and to compare German ideals
with American. The club will take
an entirely neutral attitude on the
present European war. Membership
will be limited to 30, and meetings
will be held every other week. The
next meeting will be held at 6:45
o'clock Wednesday evening.
FRED W. BUTZEL, '97, TO SPEAK
AT MENORAH METING SUNDAY
Fred M. Butzel, '97, a prominent
Detroit lawyer and president of the
Limited Jewish Charities of that city
will address the members of the Men-
orah society at 8:00 o'clock Sunday
evening in Newberry hall. Mr. But-
zel's subject will be, "Some Tenden-
cies in the Social Work of the Jews."
Abraham J. Levin, '16, president of
the society has announced that the
following speakers will appear be-
fore the society in the near future:
Prof. Edward Chauncey Baldwin of
the English department of the Uni-
versity of Illinois, who will speak on
"Job" on December 12; Henry Hur-
witz, organizer of the Intercollegiate
Menorah association, and Prof. Julian
Morgenstern of the Hebrew Union Col-
lege of Cincinnati, Ohio.
Martin guitars, mandolins, ukeleles
and all musical instruments at Schae-
berle & Son's Music House, 110 South
Main street. oct8tf

For THANKSGIVING

LUNCHES, CANDIES, HOT SUNDAES
AT THE
SUGAR BOWL
109 SOUTH MAIN STREET

'I'

Nothing can take the place of fresh,
home-made, delicious
Betsy Ross Cv%.ndies
The finest candies in Michigan regardless of
price.Boxed to your order, fresh from the case.
Put up in one, two, three or five pound boxes,
at 50c the pound. Delivered free.
359-M Telephone Your Order 359-M

I

"Were half the power
world with terror,
Were half the wealth

that fills this
bestowed on

WE MAKE OUR OWN CANDIES OUT OF
THE PUREST AND BEST MATERIALS

We have pure cream caramels fancy French
bonbons, Butter Cream Chocolates, all
kinds of fruit and nut chocolate creams, dipped
fruit and nuts, nougats, etc. Boxes securely
wrapped for mail or express shipment.

' < iH-.-

Yt are invd to inspect the
Ico'iiect:ion.
r 41,'
-r;

I

Alimendinger's Music Shop
122 E. Liberty St.

Guaranteed $1.00 Quality at 50c the pound
Money back if you're not satisfied.
Betsy Ross Candy Shop
600 E. LIBERTY ST. ANN ARBOR, MICH.

Ma'- mm-

r-

F
a -'[.. ' "

A DV ERTISING

-m- -- -1

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

DR. J. A. WESSINGER LECTURES.
BEFORE MICHIGAN DAMES CLUB
Dr. J. A. Wessinger lectured on
"State Health Laws Important to
Housekeepers" before the Michigan
Dames association in Newberry hall
last evening.
The organization is composed en-
tirely of students' wives and was
founded at Michigan in the spring of
1914, with branches in at least a dozen
other universities and colleges, Ohio
Wesleyan and Chicago university be-
ing notable examples.
The enrollment of the association
now numbers 100 members and meets
bi-monthly in Newberry hall. All stu-
dents' wives in the university are cor-
dially invited to join the club, and can
do so by communicating with Mrs.
Holton Lowe at the Bible Chair House.
STUDENT COUNCIL REFUSES
FRESHMAN "CONFISCATION DAY"
That "Confiscation Day" would not
take place was the decision handed
down by the Student Council in re-
sponse to an appeal from the sopho-
more engineers that a day be set
'aside upon which any freshman wear-
ing other than the prescribed cap or
toque would be liable to lose his head-
gear.
"It is the duty of all upperclassmen
to uphold campus traditions," said a
member of the council, "and the big-
gest of these traditions is that a
freshman should wear his cap or
toque. It is our opinion that such a
day would only tend to arouse hos-
tility between the two underclasses,
and that is a thing we wish to avoid."
Union Will Serve Turkey-Day Feast
Members of the Michigan Union who
are planning to eat their Thanksgiv-
ing turkey at the clubhouse this year
will be treated to a sumptuous repast
according to a menu announced by the
steward yesterday. Copies of this menu
will be mailed to the various fraterni-
ties, and house-clubs and to the life
members of the Union. The dinner
will be served from 1:00 to 3:00 o'clock
on Thursday.
Shirts made to order.-G. H. Wild
Company. State St. Tailors.
2255 2255 2255 2255

REIMANN TO ADDRESS BOYS
CONFERENCE AT KALAMAZOO
Lewis C. Reimann, '16, president of
the university Y. M. C. A., will speak
next Saturday evening at the big
meeting of the Thirteenth Annual Old-
er Boys' conference in Kalamazoo.
His topic on this occasion will be
"Character Building in Boys." His
remarks will be based upon his experi-
ence in the Michigan-Harvard foot-
ball game in 1914.
Reimann spoke at the conference
here last fall and during the winter
he appeared in Kalamazoo before a
city boys' meeting. He made such a
favorable impression upon members
of the program committee that he was
obtained as a speaker for one of the
most important meetings of this
.year's three-day conference.
INDOOR SPORT BEGINS TONIGHT
Fresh Lits Hold Team Organization
Meeting in Gymnasium To-
morrow Night.
Indoor baseball practice begins'to-
night at 7:00 o'clock in Waterman
gymnasium. This is a practically new
sport at Michigan and it is hoped that
a large number of candidates will turn
out to boost their class' chances for
numerals. Nine classes have signified
their intention of putting out a team.
'A special meeting of the candidates
for the fresh lit team will be held at
7:15 o'clock tomorrow night in Water-
man gymnasium. The class manager
desires all men who are- experienced
in the game as well as all men who
would like to try out for the team.to
be at this meeting.
LATIN-AMERICAN CLUB PLANS
TO DISCUSS TRADE PROBLEMS
Latin-American Students' club held
its regular meeting Friday night and
15 men were initiated into the club.
Informal talks were given by the pres-
ident, Jose M. Hernandez, assistant in
Spanish; A. M. Morales, '17, and M. A.
del Valle, '16E.
The club plans to discuss problems
incident to trade between the United
States and South America, ar d to con-
sider important political and social
problems of South American countries.
The organization will have speakers
on these subjects at its regular month-
ly meetings..

?I -

WAN TE1)D
WANTED - Position. Cook, all,
around man. Steady- winter job. In-,
quire Christ Rock, '221 S. Univ.
Nov.20-21-23
WANTED - Copis of the Michigan
Daily for the following dates:-Octo-
ber 22d and 23d!. Five cents a copy
will be paid if brought to the Daily
office. Nov.23
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Three fine 'office rooms,
suitable for a doctor or dentist; all
piped and wired; guarsinteed steam
heat. 1713-MOR, 1661-J.. .. K. Mal-

LOST

LOST-Will the person who took the
wrong grey raincoat at.the Whitney
theatre exchange it for their own?
Call 2220 and ask for Church.
nov21-23
LOST-On Friday afternon, Holland
fountain pen, jumbo size, with broken
cap. Lost somewhere on State stret,
business section. Call Tapping, 783.
Nov.23
LOST--A pair of amber lens nose
glasses. Finder pletse call Burr M.
Mitshell. 799-J. Reward. nov.23-24
FOR SALE
FOR SALE - Three Flonzaley Choral
Union tickets. Main floor. Center.
Call 420 Miller Ave. before 5 P. M.
today. nov.23
FOR SALE-Nearly new No. 5 L. C.,
Smith typewriter. $45. Evenson and
Hyde, 310 S. State. nov.23-24

.. . ..
. .r ..

I

colm.

nov16tf

It can accompany the most difficult music written,
as well as the simpler gems.
To Any One Learnint.
The pleasure derived from the Ukulele in a few
weeks' tuition far excels that of any other instrument.
WE ARE STATE AGENTS FOR THE GENUINE

pp

LOST
LOST-Four $1.00 bills 'between South
University Inn and Buston Bros.
Return to Michigan A atly; reward.
nov2l-23

Li

CRINNELL BROS. MUSIC HOUSE
116 S. Main St. COMPETENT INSTRUCTORS. UKULELES FROM $6.00 UP. Phone 1707

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