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November 21, 1915 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-21

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THE DAILY
$2.00
OF THE WORLD"ANDI
THE CAMPUS

The

s
ri .
,tic.

ally

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY TII
NEW YORK SUIT

NEWS

V

VOL. XXVI. No. 42.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

SUNDAY,. NOVE1BE '21, 1915.

PRICE FIVE C

- _ - --------

FRESH DENTS IN
CHAMPIONSHIPIN
CLASH WITH LAWS
BROWN AN) WHITMARISH STAR
FOR :DENTAL ELEVEN IN DE-
CISIVE GAME
LINE-PLUNGING SPECTACULAR
Mason and Goetz Valuable Assets to
Wining Eleven; McCall and
Stevens Play Good dame
Fight and aggressi'reness won the
campus championshi) for the dents in
yesterday's final game in the inter-
class series. After. an evenly played
half, the laws weakened and the ivory
menders scored two touchdowns in the
second part of the game. To Brown,
the speedy left half, goes the credit
for both tallies, one resulting from
straight line plunging and the other
from an intercepted pass. Whitmarsh
kicked both goals, totaling 14 points
for the dents as against 0 for the se-
nior laws.
At the beginning of the game neither
team 'was able to gain on the other,
both lines holding strongly. The laws
had good interference, but the dents
had an'equally good defense. Mason
at left end for the dents and Goetz at
left guard seemed to encounter no dif-
ficulty in getting through the law line,
and several times they succeeded in
tackling the runner from behind, as
well as breaking up end plays. Whit-
marsh and Brown were also important
factors in the dent defense, success-
fully preventing the laws from tearing
off any long runs around the ends or
through the line. The laws were
(Continued on Page Three).
HOBBS TO TELL JUNIORS
ABOUT, MILiTARY WORK
Michigan Concert Quartet, Alloha
Quartet, and Banjo Artists on
J-Lt Smoker Program.
Plans are completed to give the junior
lit smoker, which is scheduled for
7:30 o'clock tomorrow night at the
Union, a program as unique and va-
ried as any to which the name "smok-
er" can be applied.
Professor William 11. Hobbs, of the
geology department, will be the speak-
er. As secretary of the faculty com-
mittee which drafted the plan for
compulsory military training, he will
give a thorough explanation of the
proposition and will answer criti-
cisms which have been offered during
the past week. In view of the fact
that campus discussion of the pro-
posal has shown opinion, to be sharply
divided, it is anticipated that many
men from other classes besides the
junior lits will be present to hear an
authoritative statement of the fac-
uulty's attitude and the reasons be-
hind it.
The Michigan oCncert quartet,
composed of H. L. Davis, '17, Chase
B. Sikes, '16, Harry Carslon, '17, and
F. W. Grover, '18, will provide part
of the musical entertainment. Dean
J. DeButts, '8E, and Halstead Cot-
tington, '19, will figure in an original
piana-banjo performanc. In addi-
tion, the Alloha String quartet, com-
prising W. F. Crockett, '17L, ukulele,
Harry Carlson, '17, steel playing, C.
S. Seabrook, '17, guitar, and Ralph S.
Moore, '18E, mandolin, will contribute

lnumbers in Hawaiian harmony.
OFFICER OF HEALTH SERVICE
SERIOUSLY ILL IN PORTO RICO.
Washington, Nov. 20.-Information
was received here tonight that Dr.
Henry R. Carter, assistant surgeon
general of the public health service,
is seriously ill of fever at San Juan,
Porto Rico.

MHIGAN 10 NEEDED
IN WORK OF RED CROSS
AMBULANCES AT FRONT
31ajority of Large Universities Have
Responded to Cause of
Mercy
K. T. WHITE, EX-'17E, L. P. HALL
ANDI R. iALL NOW IN FRANCE
$1,000 NEEDED TO FURTHER EQUIP
FIELD HOSPITALS
One of the most important features
of the American ambulance hospital
work in France is the spenidid ser-
vice rendered by the automobile am-
bulances.
The great need, after the war broke
out in Europe, was in providing for
the conveyance of the wounded from
the various field hospitals on the firing
line lo more permanent hospitals far-
ther back in the country where the
wounded could receive proper medical
attention. This need was rendered im-
perative by the fact that many sol-
diers died from loss of blood and in-
fections before they could be taken
away. Then the American ambulance
hospital extended its work of mercy
and asked for help from America.
The call was nobly responded to and
90 motor ambulances were donated by
colleges, societies and pri~vate parties
in America for the conveyance of the
wounded. Among the eastern colleges
contributing to the cause were Dart-
mouth, Harvard, Yale, Princeton and
Columbia, besides societies in other
colleges. Besides contributing to the
cause with money, many college men
offered their services free of charge.
The cost of maintaining these am-
bulances is about $1,500, this buying
the chassis, paying for the transpor-
tation abroad, equipping it with an
ambulance body, providing for the
fgod and lodging of the two men as-
signed to each ambulance and main-
tain it for six months.
Kenneth T. White, ex-17E, and Ed-
win C. Wilson, ex-'15, have been en-
gaged in ambulance work. Wilson has
returned to his home in Detroit and
White is still at the front. They both
report that the aid given to the French
soldiers is of greatest importance in
saving the lives of the many who
otherwise would have died from ex-
posure and loss of blood. Two other
Ann Arbor boys are also at the front,
these being Louis P. Hall, Jr., and
Richard Hall, sons of Dr. and Mrs. L.
P. Hall. They are also doing ambu-
lance work.
Several women of prominence in
campus work are trying to start a
movement to aid this campaign. The
need of France, now that winter is
coming on again with its increased
sufferings and hardships on the part
of the wounded soldiers, is for money
and hospital, supplies. It isestimated
that $1,000 is needed a day to support
the hospitalsand the ambulances in
their work and pay for the supplies
used by the hospital. If enough in-
terest is aroused on the campus a
committee will be formed by women
capable of carrying on the work and
a general campaign for funds will be
planned.
KENTUCKY BANQUET THURSDAY
Celebrate Thanksgiving at Michigan
Uion
All men in the university from Ken-
tucky are invited to attend the Thanks-
giving banquet which the Kentucky

club will hold at the Union Thursday
night, November 25, at 6 o'clock.
Murphy Tate, '16L, president of the
club, will preside as toastmaster. Mr.
William Marsteller, instructor in the
economics departments, will be the
principal speaker of the evening, and
talks will also be given by J. S. Nor-
ton, '18, W. S. Krammerer, '18L, and
W. A. P. John, '16.

YESTERDAY'S RESU'LTS
Harvard 41, Yale 0.
Illinois 10, Chicago 0.
Minnesota 20, Wisconsin 1,
Dartmouth 0, Syracuse 0.
W. & ;. 5, Bethany 0.
Army 17, Springfield 7.
Ursinus 10, Navy 7.
Fordham 14, Carlisle 10
J.M. lAONE SPEAK
Chicago Alumnus to Address First
Sunday Meeting Today at
:3:00 O'Clock
STAINLEY WILSON TO GIVE SOLO
Weekly Sunday afternoon programs
at the Union begin with the meeting
at 3:00 o'clock this afternoon, at which
John Maxey Zane, '84, brilliant Ohi-
cago lawyer and public speaker, will
deliver an address. The meeting will
be informal and a special musical pro-
gram has been arranged. Among
other numbers will be a solo by Stan-
ley Wilson, '16, leader of the Varsity
Glee club. Light refreshments will e
served.
The Union has been fortunate in se-
curing Mr. Zane. He is known in Chi-'
cago as one of the ablest counselors
and most brilliant trial lawyers at the
bar. He is the author of a book on
banks and banking and of several ar-
ticles in the law reviews of the coun-
try. Mr. Zane is well known as a
public speaker. 4
Mr, Zane has been an active and
loyal alumnus of the university, re-
sponding to every call from her and
receiving the honorary degree of LL.
D. in 1914. Last year he and a fellow
alumnus, Frank F. Reed, of Chicago,
gave 15 valuable etchings of great
jurists to the law school, which are
now hanging in room C of the law
building. He has also contributed $1 ,-
000 toward the Union building cam-
paign fund.
DEBATE SQUAD CUT TO 12 MEN
Elimination to be Completed on
Wednesday Afternoon
Tryouts for the Varsity debating
teams which will meet the University
of Chicago and Northwestern univer-
sity in the Central Debating league
were continued yesterday morning and
six more men dropped from the squad
The remaining men have been ar-
ranged into the following two teams:
Affirmative-J. R. Cotton, '16; B. Har-
ris, '16L; W. Brucker, '16L; H. H.
Springstun; '17; R. S. Hunter, '16L,
and A. J. Stoddard, '17L. Negative--N.
E. Pinney, '16; H. B. Teegarden, '17;
L. W. Lisle, '17L; W. L. Goodwin,'16L;
A. J. Michaelson, '16L, and P. V. Rams-
dell, '16.
The two teams will meet in a for-
mal debate on Wednesday evening at
7:00 o'clock. At this time each man
of whom will compose the Varsity
will be allowed seven minutes for di-
rect argument and three minutes far
rebuttal. Upon their showing in this
debate eight men will be picked, six
teams and two who will act as alter-
nates.

UNION AUT '01 11S FE)EL THAT
ALI'2Nt ARE BEIINI)
P11 JE T
O MAKE PLANS FOR UNION
IIIio Yesterday.
Aluibk i Subscriptions to Union.
Detroi............. I70,560
hicago................61,320
New York City.........28,528
Minneapolis .............:25,505
Ann Arbor .. .. . . . . . . . . . 23,09-,
Granad Rlpids ..........11,045
Ci neti..............8,650
C e ulnad .............. 7,116
ilw:.hee . .. ... 6,060
B ay Citiy . . .. . . 6,050
3Je7k 1 <...../.f.y.......... 3,560
Total subseri tion to
(date . . . . . . .. . . .. $636,0019

PORTEH TALKS TO
' EFT fTNIOHT

Execuiv~e Secretary i i
"~Whait the TIi -e rsiy
I ink,

SIpea k

OIL

With i '36,09 already subscribed to
the .ichian Union building fund,
and nt moe than 50 per cot of the
a unni apjruached by the Uaion com-
miites, the oulook for a successful
carmpaig is an optimistic one. The
sntaiment of those who attended the
union committee meeting held at the
Union yesterday was that the work
was advancing in good fashion and
that the campai;gn will be pushed to
the finish.
Although this is the7 first campaign
among the alumni of the university for
such an immense project as the pres-
ent one, the response of the Michi-
gan gi.._d;Iat.s has ben exceptionally
Food according to those in charge of
the campaign.
Active prepar:ations for the new
Union building are now under way, a
LuiIng committee having charge of
the planning and contract letting. At
the meetmig held yesterday, the arch-
itects, K. Pond and A. B. Pond,
Aere both present.
Sevral prominent alumni, among
whom were Win. 1). McKensie of Chi-
cago, Judge Lane. Chas. D. Harris of
Cleveland, and Staaley McGraw of
New York Cit, were present at the
meeting.
All of the Alumni advisory commit-
tee were present with the exception of
Delbert J, Haff, '46L, of Kansas City,
Mo. Three of the members of the
general campaign committee also
failed to be present, namely, Harry C.l
Bulkley, Benjamin S. Hanchett and
George W. Millen.
1916 DEMOCRTI'I Vt)NVENTION
RA WS SPIITflE I CO ET1T1ON
Washington, Nov. 20.--Two hundred
thousand dollars, the biggest offer
ever made, is the price put up by San
Francisco to capture the 1516 DeMo-
cratic national convention. When
the Democratic national committee
meets here December 7, it will also
have $100,000 offered from Dallas, St.
Louis and Chicago. Chicago may
boost its bid to compete with San
Francisco. Omaha is also said to be
in the race.

i T EXPLANS "Y" SCHOOL
"What the University Man Thinks"
will be the subjet on which David
R. Porter of New York City, execu-
tive secretary of student Y. M. C. A.
work, will speak at 6:30 o'clock to-
night in University hall under the
paspices of the student association
A large attendance is expected this
evening for Mr. Porter is recognized
as one of the big men of this coun-
try.
The speaker has succeeded John R.
Kott as leader in the international
student movement and the fulfillment
of his position has brought him in
contact with men of all nationalities.
His experience and ability make him
an exceedingl3 interesting and
forceful speaker.
Mr. Porter ccent to Trinity 'College,
Oxford, in 19v4 vith the first group of
Rhodes scholars from the United'
States., Ther lie spent three years
and received both his Bathelor's and
Master's degrees. After some experi-
ence with the city and state Y. M.
-C. A. of New York, he has since been
connected with the International
Committee. He is at present at the
bead of the student department of
this committee.
The recently organized Y. M. C. A.
School for Studies in Religion will be
explained at the Sunday meeting by
W. R. Hiunt, '16, chairman. The meth-
od of carrying out the new plan will
be announced at this time.
Themeeting this evening has been
scheduled for 6:30 o'clock and will
open promptly in order not to inter-
fere with regular church services.
Special music has been provided.
During his short visit in Ann Arbor,
Mr. Porter will be kept busy by the
different officers and committees of
the Y. M. C. A. Besides the big meet-
ing at U hall tonight, he will speak
before several smaller sessions today.

FRENCH TRANSPORBINDWT
SUBMAINlED WIT
100MENON8OAR
FIFTY-THREE SURVIVORS P1CKEI)
UP BY A BRITISH SHIP IN
MEIDITERRANEAN
LODD KITCHENER IN ATHENS
The French Forces in Southern Serbia
Are Holding Favorable Po-
sitions
London, Nov. 20.-The French trans-
port "Balcazes," with 100 French sol-
diers on board, has been sunk in the
Mediterranean by a submarine of un-
known nationality, according to the
Star. Fifty-three survivors were
picked up by the British ship "Lady
Plymouth." They were found cling-
ing to wreckage and life rafts.
One of the survivors, an officer, said
he saw three soldiers swim toward the
submarine, hoping to be taken aboarO,
The officer of the submarine beat the
men's hands until they let go. The
soldiers on the transport were return-
ing home after long service in the
trenches.
Lord Kitchener Arrives in Athens
London, Nov. 20.-Lord Kitchener
arrived at Athens today and this aft-
ernoon was received in audience by
King Constantine. The British min-
ister at Athens accompanied the war
secretary. No information has yet
been made public regarding the re-
sult of the audience. An unverified
statement received here tonight stated
that the Entente powers had present-
ed demands to Greece today insisting
upon its immediate participation in the
war on the side of the allies or the
mobilizaton of the Greek army.
In contradiction of this report the
Capria, of Athens, publishes an inter-
view with M. Buellemin, the French
minister to Greece, in which the latter
is quoted as saying that the diplomatic
negotiations now in progress do not
contemplate the participation of
Greece in the war.
French Troops Hold in Serbia
London, Nov. 20.-The French force
in southern Serbia seem to be in a
fairly favorable position, and it is
hoped that if reinforcements arrive in
time the whole situation will change
for the better. The French, after re-
pulsing Bulgarian attacks for three
days, are now redoubling their efforts
to occupy Kuprilli.
Austrian Forces Cut Off Serbians
London, Nov. -20.-Austrian forces
on the west flank of the Austro-Ger-
man line in Serbia were bound toward
Montenegro with the apparent object
of cutting off Serbian retreat to that
country should the Serbians be driven
entirely from their own territory. The
Austrians enteringthe old Sanjak of
Nozinovi Bazai have occupied Nova-
zaros and Sieniza, well across the bor-
der of the Sanjak and 12 miles north-
east of the town of Noeizazar. At the
same time they have defeated the Mon-
tenegrins at Priboj, just, inside the
Sanjak and in Montenegrir territory
20 miles southeast of Tisterag.
NEW SEA CONTROVERSY LIKELY

Norwegian Steamer Ulriten Torpedoed
and Sunk
Washington, Nov. 20.-The possibil-
ity of another submarine controversy
with Germany seems imminent from
reports reaching the state department
today that the Norwegian steamer Ul-
riten has been torpedoed and sunk
without warning, causing the loss of
four lives.

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

FIRST METHRODIST C URC
ARTHUR W. STALKER, X. 9., Mlnister
Morning Subject: "A Matter of Appreciation."
Evening Subject: "Does it Pay to Be Good?"
Quartette. Ada Grace Johnson, Alice Bliton,
Odra Patton, Stanley Wilson.
STATE AND WASHINGTON STREETS
U{

TOIDAY
Cosmopolitan club meets, Harris hall,
3:00 o'clock.
David R. Porter speaks, "Y" meeting,
U hall, 6:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Oratorical board meets, room 304 N.
W., 4:30 o'clock.4
Dr. J. A. Wessinger speaks to Mich-
igan Darnes, Newberry hall, 8:00
o'clock.

i

I

I . ,

OTnight
6:30
o'clock

Davit or Ter

Un iversity
Hall

I

/
/
/

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