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October 08, 1915 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-08

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I

THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF TIE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

ne

t isigan

Phones :-Editorial 241
Business 960
jTELERAPHSERVICE BY
NEW YORK SUN



Vol. XXVI. No. 4.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER, 8, 1915.

.._______ __Y_____________

UNION OPEN HOUSE TO
HEAR COACH YOST ON
MICHIGAN ATHLETICS
Professor Bunker and Professor Allen
to Speak Before Gathering of
Old and New Men
STUDENT ENTERTAINERS AND
SPEAKERS MAKE UP PROGRAM
"YPSI" CIDER IN CROCKS TO
QUENCH MORE THAN 2,500
THIRSTS
Between 2,500 and 8,000 men stu-
dents of the university will appear at
the Michigan Union clubhouse at 8:15
o'clock tonight for the traditional open
house night, at which new students
mingle with the old. A brilliant and
snappy program has been prepared
by Edward J. Crumpacker, '16E, chair-
man of the program committee.
Coach Fielding H. Yost has prom-
ised to give a talk on Michigan Ath-
ldics, in which he will point out the
d~uty of all men of athletic ability to
report for he teams. Prof. Robert
Bunker, of the Law school, and Prof.
Johh R. Allen, of the Engineering col-
lege, will both be on hand with rous-
ing speeches.
"Hal" Smith, '16, track captain and
newly appointed yell master, will lead
off with a few familiar yells. W. A.
P. 'ohn, '16, has promised to talk
about °10 or 15 minutes, and Leroy
Scailon, '16L, will produce some of
his famous feature ' stunts on the
piano. Chase Sikes, '16, is o the pro-
gram for a solo, and Dean De Butts,
who is starting his first year at Mich-
igan after having formerly attended
Chicago university, will appear in the
recently announced role of the "Dark
Horse Wonder" of the piano. "Ike"
Fischer will be on hand with his or-
chestra, and Sikes will lead off a few
Michigan songs.
'Ypsi" cider will be placed in huge
crocks about the tables in. the dance
hall, and stacks of pretzels or dough-
nuts will be served. Arrangements
have been made so that the mass
meeting for freshmen to be held in
the Hill Auditorium at 7:00 o'clock
will close in time so that all new men
will have a chance to appear at the
big assemblage.' A platform is now
being built at the west end of the hall,
and, if the weather is right, orchestra
chairs will be set on the Union's back
lawn facing the southwest doors of
the building.
Bryan Enjoys His Private Citizenship
Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 7.-In a statement
made here today, William Jennings
Bryan said that among the arrange-
ments he had made for the rest of his
life was a determination to eigage in
active politics, but not to run for of-
fice. He also says that he enjoys the
liberty of a private citizen.
Use Old Boiler House as Laboratory
Laboratory work by the students in
the highway engineering department
has been greatly facilitated by the tak-
ing over by the department of the old
boiler house. The north half of the
structure will be used for this pur-
pose, while the south portion will be
occupied by the automobile labora-
tories.
Forestry Rooms Occupied by Civils
Forestry courses, in evacuating the
engineering building to take up quar-
ters in the new science building, have
left several rooms in the basement
and on the fourth floor of the engi-

neering building, which are now to be
occupied by the civil engineering de-
partm en
C. C. C. Crump Instructor at Carleton
Mr. C. C. C. Crump, a former mem-
ber of the observatory staff of the uni-
versity, has been appointed instructor
in astronomy at Carleton college,
Northfield, Minn.

PRE E~IT[VINSITS NEW YORK
TOP SEC(RERING FOR FIANCEE
Mrs. (Tait Says She is Happy; Refuses
to Talk of Engagement
(By the New York Sun Service.)
Washington, Oct. 7.-President Wil-
son will make his first appearance as
bridegroom-to-be in New York, when
he will attend a dinner to be given by
Colonel and Mrs. E. M. House. The
chaperon will be Mrs. W. H. Bowling,
Mrs.Gat's niother. Among those who
will attend are Dr. C. P. Garrison, U.
S. N., and Secretary J. P. Tumulty.
The reason currently assigned for
the trip to New York is that Mr. Wil-
son is going there to purchase an en-
gagement ring. Tie president has not
yet made any effort to select an en-
gagement present, owing to the fact
that he was not ready to announce the
engagement until yesterday.
Mrs. Galt would say very little today,
when interviewed, merely stating, "I
am very happy. All else has been said
at the White House."
BISHOP.STUNTZ TO TALK
BEFORE WESLEYAN GUILD
Authority on international Affairs
One of Many Noted Speakers
to Be Heard Here
Bishop Homer C. Stuntz, of Buenos
Aires, Argentina, will deliver the first
address on this year's Wesleyan Guild
program at 7:30 o'clock Sunday even-
ing in the Methodist church. Bishop
Stuntz will speak on the subject, "The
Two Americas," in which he will show
the close relationship between North
and South America.
Extensive travels and a constant in-
terest in world affairs have made the
bishop an authority on international
relations. During recent years he has
spent much time in foreign countries,
notably i the Phillipine Islands and
also in India, where he has done mis-
sionary work. Since 1912 he has been
in South America, where he has been
at the head of the Methodist church.
In addition to the address to. be
given by Bishop Stuntz, this year's
Wesleyan Guild program includes
such men as Dr. David Starr Jordon,
chancellor of Leland Stanford univer-
sity; Rev. Charles R. Brown, dean of
the school of religion of Yale univer-
sity; Dr. Edward Steiner, a professor
in Grinnell college, Grinnell, la., and
Rev. Thomas Nicholson, of New York
city.
Wilson Indorses Reserve Bank Policy
(By the New York Sun Service.)
Washington, Oct. 7.-Secretary Mc-
Adoo has received a letter from Presi-
dent Wilson in which the latter in-
dorses McAdoo's suggestion for the
establishment by the federal reserve
banks of joint agencies in Central
America and southern South Aerica.
The president suggests that the mat-
ter be brought to the attention of the
federal reserve board.
SWHAT'S GOING ON'
TODAY
Meeting of the Webster society, at
Webster hall, 7:00 o'clock.
Freshman "pep" meeting at Hill Audi-
torium, 7:15 o'clock.
Supper at Barbour Gym, 4:00 o'clock.
Open House, at the Michigan Union,
8:00 o'clock.

Social at the Church of Christ, 8:00
o'clock.
TOMORROW
Football, Michigan vs. Mt. Union,
Ferry Field, 2:30 o'clock.
Baptist reception, Guild hall, 8:00
o'clock.
Presbyterian reception, McMillan hall,
8:00 o'clock.
First Union dance, Michigan Union,
9:00 o'clock.

LAW MAGAZINE BOARD BEAN BATES SPEAKER
HOLDS FIRST MEETING AT FIRST GATHERING
rrn unu IfhII'rirrnini nr arwiii.n ri frr'

[ULLUVYIINb LtLUIIUI
Faculty Picks 20 Men as Assistnts
to Professor Holbrook, Editor
of Legal Review
SELECTION SAME AS THAT OF
CLASS WITH ONE EXCEPTION
JUNIOR LAWS VOTE ON SIX MEN
IN SECTION MOST WORTHY
OF HONOR
Newly selected members of the
Board of Editorial Assistants of The
Michigan Law Review recently held
their first meeting. Twenty juniors
are selected by the faculty of the
School pf Law at the end of each
school year to act as assistants to
Prof. Evans Holbrook, the editor of
the Review. Each member of the
junior law class voted on the six men
in his particular section whom he con-
sidered most worthy of serving on the
Review. The final choice was made
by the faculty of the school on a basis
of scholastic standing. 'I'he men fin-
ally selected were those chosen by
their class with but a single excep-
tion.
The men selected are as follows:
Lyle M. Clift, Bay City; W. C. Mul-
lendore, Howard, Kansas; W. L. Mil-
ler, North Benton, Ohio; R. O. Brown-
, ell, Westfield, Pa.; A. J. Mickelson,:
Calumet; H. B. Sutter, Indiana, Pa.;
H. L. Bell, Vanceburg, Ky.; John L.
Mechein, Battle Creek; Myron Mc-
Laren, Ann Arbor; T. H. Westlake,
Cleveland, Ohio; R. E. Richardson,
Ubly; W. F. Whitman, Grand Rapids;
Renville Wheat, Ann Arbor; Werner
W. Schroeder, Kankakee, Ill.; Hollace
M. Reid, Oriskany, Va.; L. M. Sprague,
Ann Arbor; Maurice Weinberger, Kan-
sas City, Mo.; A. A. Morrow, West
Alexander, Pa.; E. R. McCall, Winter-
set, Iowa; J. J. Heen, Chatsworth, Ill.,
and Russell H. Neilson, West Branch.
%00,000,000 Loan to be Passed Upon
New York, Oct. 7.-A few details still
remain unsettled for the consumma-
tion of the $500,000,000 loan by the
American underwriting syndicate to
England and France. It is thought
that they will be passed upon tonight.
The signatures of the parties prob-
ably will be attached tomorrow. Lord
Reading will sign for England, and
Mallet and Homberg for France.
J. P. Morgan today laughingly dis-
pelled the idea that he personally
would sign for the American under-
writers, acting as agent for them. He
said it would be foolish for him to do
it when he could get so many more to
join.
War Holds Up Work on New Telescope
Discs of flint and crown glass for
Michigan's new telescope which is be-
ing built through the generosity of
Mr. R. P. Lamont, have been reported
ready for the glass makers. At pres-
ent the discs are at Jena, Germany,
where they have been held up for two
months due to the war. After reach-
ing this country it will require one
year to turn out the finished lenses.
Skinner May Not Return to Consulate
Washington, Oct. 7.-Uncertainty
was expressed here today as to wheth-
er or not Consul-General Skinner,
American representative in London,
would return to his post. There is
question whether his usefulness has
not been impaired by the attitude of
the English government toward his
efforts in London.
Many Engineers Take Geology Course
According to a statement given out
last night by Prof. William H. Hobbs,
of the Geology department, there are

over 100 students enrolled in the
course in geology for engineers. This
is more than twice the number that
took the course last year.

1 Varsity Band to Make Appearance at
Educational Meeting for
Newcomers
FRESHMEN TO HEAR SCHROEDER,
MIcKINNEY, GAULT AND REIMANN
WOLVERINE . SONGS . AND . YELLS
PART OF INSTRUCTIVE
PROGRAM
Michigan freshmen this fall will have
an early opportunity to learn the tra-
ditions, songs and yells of their Alma
Mater. Under the auspices of the stu-
dent council they will meet at 7:15
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium.
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
School, prominent students and the
Varsity band will be on hand to enter-
tain the yearlings and instruct them.
According to Councilman Francis T.
Mack, '16E, chairman, the meeting will
be short and snappy, and will be over
in time for the freshmen to attend the
Michigan Union's open-house.
In addition to Dean Bates' talk,
which will be on the subject .of what
is expected of Michigan men, Werner
W. Schroeder, '14-16L, will speak on
the customs and traditions of the Mich-
igan campus. Francis F. McKinney,
'16L, managing editor of The Michigan
Daily, will talk to the freshmen, bring-
ing out the right attitude to be assumed
at the impending underclass contests
and at Varsity athletic games. Harry
G. Gault, '15-'17L, president of the
Union, will tell the first-year men
about the Union, and Louis Reimann,
'16L, president of the Students' Y. M.
C. A., will talk about the organization
he heads.
Earl V. Moore, '12, of the school of
music, together with Stanley Wilson,
'16, leader of the Glee club, will under-
take to teach the freshmen six Wol-
verine songs. The words will be
thrown upon a large screen. Captain
Harold Smith, '16, of the track team,
and official cheer leader, will teach the
freshmen Michigan yells. Photogra-
pher A. S. Lyndon- has consented to
throw upon the screen campus views
and football pictures. The Varsity
band will make its first appearance
this season at the meeting tonight.
. S. Not Ready to Recognize Carranza
Washington, Oct. 7.-It is intimated
in official circles here today that the
recognition of General Carranza as
president of Mexico would be with-
held for some time. It is thought that
the conference to be held on Saturday
will not be the last over the question.
The state department wants more evi-
dence on the part of Carranza that he
will be able to restore and preserve
peace in Mexico.
Rumored That Germany Buys Off Irish
New York, Oct. 7.-Several of the
246 young Irish immigrants arriving
today on the American liner New York
are reported to have said that they
received $100 each and free passage
to this country from German interests
in Ireland. The rewards were sup-
posed to be for not enlisting in the
British army. On being questioned all
of them vigorously denied the rumor.
Law School Figures Were Incorrect
Owing to an error, the enrollment
figures for the School of Law were
incorrectly published in yesterday's
Daily. The correct figures, including
yesterday's totals, are 417, a decrease
of 61 from last year's count of 478 up
to the same time.

T. R. Honored by Mothers' Association
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Oct. 7.-Theo-
dore Roosevelt was re-elected honor-
ary president of the State Mothers' As-
sociation here today.

.;

To

I

Freshman

ass

Learn What is Expected of a Michigan Man
HILL AUDITORIUM, 7:15 P.1M. IlYouI

ffl

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