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November 20, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-20

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THE DAILY
NE W OF THE WORLD AND
T11 CAMPUS

The

Mich igan

Daily

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Buslness 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THlEI
NEW YORK SUN

~W7 .~1*'~1

VOL. XXVL. No. 41.

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

-- -.- - I

BRITISH EMIASSY
ISSUESAFFIDAYI
Captain of 41esperian" Relates Tae
of Finding Metal on Bridge
Before Explosion
AMERICAN EXPERTS ACT ON CASE
Washington, Nov. 19.-The British
embassy tonight made public an affi-
davit sworn to by the captain of the
Canadian liner Hesperian, which was
sunk last September, presumably as
the result of a torpedo attack launched
at the vessel without any warning be-
in; given.
The chief interest in the affidavit is
tie fact tat the captain tells about
tie pickir g up on the bridge of the
hesperia:a of a particle of metal be-
heved to b' a piece of a torpedo from
the explosion which later caused the
vessel to sink. American naval ex-
perts, after an examination, state that
it was unquestionably from a torpedo.
The state department thereupon
called the fact to the attention of the
C.erman government, but it was ex-
plained that the department was not
in any position to make representation
to Germany, because it had no direct
proof that the metal submitted to it
was actually picked up on the Hes-
perian.
WOHEN ' TO PRESENT PAGEANT
University Authorities Allow League
to Stage Production
The university authorities have
just granted permission to the Wo-
men's League to present a pageant.
When "Joan of Arc" was given in
1914 it was hoped that the event
might become a custom and that, pat-
terning after some of the eastern col-
leges, it might be given every two
years. The Senate's permission has
made the 1916 pageant an assured
event.
As before, the pageant will be
given under the direction of the
league. The nature of it and the
committee which is to be in charge
of it will be announced in the near
future.
NOT GUILTY VERDICT RETURNED
W. B. Warren, '16E, Acquitted in
Mock Trial at Congregational
Church
"Not guilty," was the verdict re-
turned W. B. Warren, '16E, defendant
in an arson case at the Congrega-
tional church mock trial last even-
ing. It was concluded that the plain-
tiff, E. It. Waite, '16, had no cause for
action.
Rev. Lloyd C Douglas, pastor of
the Congregational church, was the
lawyer for the plaintiff, while Prof.
W. D. Moriarty successfully defend-
ed the accused. Witnesses for the
plaintiff were W. E. Scott, '19, Mar-
jorie A.'Bates, '16, and William B.
Warren, '16E. Those called upon by
the defendant were Harriet K. Wal-
ker, '17, Carl L. Person, '19, and Rob-
ert F. Paton, grad.
Refreshments were serven fter the
trial. Miss Irene H. Skin , of the
school of music, and Philip C. Love-
joy, '16, planned the entertainment.

English Imprison 12 U. S. Sailors
Liverpool, Nov. 19.-Twelve Ameri-
cans, members of the crew of the Am-
erican line steamer New York, which
arrived here Monday from New York,
were today sentenced to 14 days' im-
prisonment at hard labor for leaving
their vessel when they were unpro-
vided with passports and after per-
mission to land had been refused.

J=Hop Committee1
Decides On Dance
Appoint E. B. Palmer, '17, and Louis
F. Dieterich, '17E, to Arrange
for Music
Conservatism and true Michigan
spirit are to characterize the tone of
the 1916 J-Hop, according to the sen-
timent prevailing at the first meet-
ing of the Hop committee, which was
held at the Union last night.
It was decided to make good music
the feature of the big dance this year,
as well as to pay especial attention
to excellence in decorating. Edwin
B. Palmer, '17, and Louis F. Dieterich,
'17E, were appointed as the commit-
tee to arrange for music. Other com-
mittees on special arrangements re-
main to be appointed later.
In addition, Edwin B. Palmer was
elected secretary of the general com-
mittee, and James L. Whalen, '17E,
treasurer. Louis M. Bruch, '16L, gen-
eral treasurer of the 1915 Hop, was
called in to give advice based on ex-
perience with the Hop last year.
While no attempt was made to set-
tle any details, it was determined that
the cotillion of last year was not suc-
cessful enough to justify retaining it'
as a feature. A limitation will be
placed on the number of couples to
attend.
The committee will meet for the
second time at the Union next Tues-
day evening. Due to the ineligibility
of W. K. Niemann, a vacancy has oc-
curred in the representation of the
junior lits.
LAR1GE CROWD ATTENDS
WOMEN'SLEAGUE CIRCUS
Ialrbour Gym Contains "Charlie Chap.
lin Acts" in Cabaret Show, and
Amusing Movie

DAVID PORTER TO
SPEAK ON SUNDAY

Will be Present at First
sociation Meeting in
sity Hall

Student
Univer.

As.

ANNOUNCE NEW SCHOOL PLAN
With ravid R. Porter, of New York
City, one of the biggest men in Y. M.
C. A. work, obtained as the main
speaker, plans have been practically
completed for the student association
meeting in University hall at 6:30
o'clock Sunday evening.
The meeting will be the first of the
series arranged by the university or-
ganization for Sunday evenings dur-
ing the school year. Experienced
speakers will be brought here and the
meetings will begin at 6:30 o'clock
in order not to conflict with regular
church services.
The new Y. M. C. A. plan of a
school for students in religion will
be announced Sunday by the commit-
tee in charge. The methods carried
out in other universities will also be
explained.
David R. Porter is a member of the
international committee of the Y. M.
C. A. and has varied experience in
the foreign field. He will speak at
many of the student conferences
throughout the United States.
JUSTICE CHARLES E. HUGHES
ALLOWEI TO WITHDRAW NAME
Lincoln, Neb., Nov. 19.-Supreme
Court Justice Charles E. Hughes will
be allowed to withdraw his name as
a Republican presidential candidate.
The secretary of state has made not
official ruling and will make none!
until after the declaration of nomina-
tion is received. But it is unofficially
stated that the wishes of the justice
will be observed and his name with-
drawn. Those who filed his name sayc
they will take other means to push
him forward as the local candidate.
FRESH LITS HOLD FIRST DANCE
Strict Freshman Social Gathering toa
be Preceded by a Short c
Program1
Fresh lits will hold their first danc-
ing party at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon
in Barbour gymnasium.l
This is to be a strictly freshman af-
fair, and it is necessary for all mem-
bers to bring their treasurer's receipt
for college dues in order to be ad-1
mitted. The men are to use the up-a
stairs door, while the women will enterg
the basement.s
A short program will be given by
members of the class, after which all
will participate in dancing.a
The object of the party is to get ac-
iuainted, and all freshmen should getc
out and meet their fellow classmates.
Situation in Balkans Seems Seriouss
London, Nov. 19.-The allies admitv
the situation in the Balkans to beI
serious and the attitude of Greece isI
said to be most perplexing. The alliesc
iave by no means abandoned the cam-r
paign, however, as they are making
very effort to aid the Serbians andc
still hope to obtain the support oft
Greece.1

Uncertainty Ovei
New War Ships
Bids Submitted for Their Construction
Exceed Limit of Cost Fixed
by Congress
Washington, Nov. 19.-Great uncer-
tainty exists over and considerable de-
lays are probable in the construction
of the two new dreadnaughts, bids for
which were opened in the navy depart-
ment two days ago.
Secretary Daniels announced today
that an examination naa disclosed the
fact that none of the proposals from
the three ship-building companies can
be legally accepted, as all exceed the
limit of the cost fixed by congress in
the appropriation for these vessels.
The limit fixed for the hull and ma-
chinery of the two vessels was $7,-
800,000.
The bidders name figures below this
limit, but in so doing sacrifice certain
expenses usually borne by the con-
tractors, and these will have to be as-
sumed by the government if the bids
are accepted. Some of these expenses
the government cannot.legally assume,
according to the secretary.
PRESIDENT I B ANGELL
HEADS DEFENSE LEAGUE
Organization Founded for Purpose of
Heeding Military Plans for
Nation's Defense
President-Emeritus James B. Angell
was chosen honorary chairman of the
Ann Arbor branch of the National Se-
curity league at a meeting of the or-
ganization yesterday afternoon.
The National Security league is an
organization formed for the purpose
of laying before the country the plans
of defense which have been worked
out by the military advisers-the gen-
eral staff of the army and the general
board of the navy. It is also the pur-
pose of the organization to urge the
citizens to co-operate in urging that
congress pay heed to these advisers?
and make necessary provision for the
defense of the country. Branches have
been formed in all the states with a
view toward making national defense
an issue in each congressional district.
Steps have been taken to establish
branches in over 200 cities.
The Ann Arbor branch has 76 mem-
bers, all of whom are working vigor-
ously to further the projects of the
league. These members are practically
all faculty men, but outsiders will be
given an opportunity to join at a mon-
ster mass meeting to be held in the
near future. Men of national import
will be brought to Ann Arbor to speak
at this meeting.
The other offices in the Ann Arbor
organization are filled by men well
known in university circles. Prof. W.
H. Hobbs, who was secretary of the
senate committee on military training,
was elected chairman. Prof. S. L.'
Bigelow is vice-chairman; Prof. J. W.
Bradshaw, who was at the training
camp at Plattsburg last summer, sec-
retary, and Dr. A. G. Hall treasurer.
Prof. John R. Allen was appointed
chairman of the membership commit-
tee, while W. B. Shaw heads the pub-
licity committee.

STAGE ANNUAL ALUMNI
SMOKER NEXT SATURDAY1
Varsity Football Team to be Feted by
Detroit Grads at Board of
Commerce
Detroit alumni will hold their an-
nual, football smoker a week from
tonight in the Board of Commerce au-
ditorium, corner of Lafayette boule-
vard and Wayne street, in Detroit.
Members of this year's Varsity will
be there, and thy band and cheer
leaders will also be on hand to im-
part to the "old men" some of the
"pep" that has prevailed among the
undergraduates this season. Movies
of the games will be shown, and
there will be several short talks.
Tickets have been put on sale at
Huston's and the Union, as it is ex-
pected that a large number of stu-
dents will go to Detroit for the week-
end in order to attend tl. smoker.
James Watkins, '09, is general
chairman of the affair this year.
ARRANGE TO GIVE SAXOPHONE
PARTY AT UNION DECEMBER 3
Plans have been made to bring the
popular Wright Saxophone trio, of Co-
lumbus, Ohio, to Ann Arbor on the
evening of December 3, for a dance
at the Union. As this will be the only
saxophone party before the Christmas
holidays, it is expected a large crowd
will turn out for the affair. The date
of the sale of tickets has not been defi-
nitely decided as yet.
WILL GIVE CHESS EXHIBITION

KING OFHOUMANI
CALLSCOUNCIL O
LEAINGPATRIOTS
TEUTONIC FORCES CLOSING IN ON
FORTS HELD BY SERBIAN
ARMY
ENGLAND LIMITS LIQUOR-SALE
Two Men Defending Marshes Prove
That Germans Are Giving Up
Drive on Russia
Havre, France, Nov. 19.-Word
reached Paris from Bucharest today
that King Ferdinand of Rumania has
formed an extraordinary council, sum-
moning together for a conference all
the prominent senators, deputies, pre-
fects and mayors of the country.
The crown council was suggested by
Premier Bratiano, who is prepared to
resign if it is found impossible to
maintain Rumania's neutrality. Act-
ing on this suggestion, the king issued
the call for the conference.
Owing to the simultaneous menacing
of Rumania by Russia and Austria,
both of which powers are massing
troops on the frontier, the king's de-
cision as to whether Rumania will
fight with the allies or the Austro-
Germans will depend upon the result
of the crown council.
Northern Serbs Make Last Stand
Vienna (via Berlin), Nov. 19.-Near-
ly surrounded in the mountains on the
border near Novi Bazar, the main Ser-
bian army of the north is making what
is probably its last-ditch struggle.
German, Austrian and Bulgar forces
are closing around the little mountain
forts, which are fighting bravely
against great odds. Dislodgment of
the Serbs from their positions is al-
most a foregone conclusion. Indica-
tions favor their capture, thoug it is
taken for granted they will make a
(Continued on Page Six)
CUPID SHOOTS .A8 ARROWS
Scherer, Reilley, Defoe, Schroeder and
Other Alumni Marry Re-
cently
Dan Cupid has been active recently
among Michigan alumni. Almost every
day notices of the little god's work
come into Alumni Secretary Shaw's of-
fice. The notices come from all parts
of the United States.
Norman W. Scherer, '12, became the
husband of Miss Hilda M. Gundlach
at Sandusky, Ohio, on September 2.
Clarence Reilley, '14E, was married
to Miss Edna E. Taft at Flint on Sep-
tember 7.
Arthur Defoe, '12, was married to
Miss Jessie Cameron, '14, at Bay City
on June 21.
Lewis W Schroeder, '11, was mar-
ried to Miss Stella Lase at Cassopolis.
Wallace W. Tuttle, '15E, and Miss
Marjorie Vitch were united in marriage
at Lansing on November 15.
Frederik E, Good was married to
Miss Florence E. Chope, of Detroit, on
Sept=mbe r 28..
Arthur 1 1. Morrison, '12E, was mar-
ried to Miss Dorothea Gerrish at Ber-
lin, .R., on October 23.
('isde Mowrer was married to Miss
E ' ' Burt a f - anti on Novem-
ber 3.

Professor Karpinski to Play
Games Simultaneously
This Evening

TwelveI

The largest crowd that ever attended
.a Women's league circus was present
at the production yesterday afternoon
in Barbour gymnasium. Crowds'
packed the galleries and floors of
rooms as the mile-long parade, pre-
ceded by the band in full uniform,
filed in to the time of "The Victors,"
led by Josephine Randall, '17. A squad
in chefs' coats and caps sold lemon-
ade, popcorn and candy at the refresh-
ment stands, while venders were sur-
rounded with eager purchasers of
Dean Myra B. Jordan's doughnuts.
The universal automobile, the "Canta-
ford," provoked laughter wherever it
went.
In the basement a tearoom with cab-
aret by "Charlie Chaplin," Margaret
Henderson, '18, and other artists was
in progress during the early part of
the afternoon. Later the seniors gave
a highly amusing movie, "Hyacinth in
the Barroom," in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall, with Helen Ely starring as Hya-
cinth and Jemima Wenley playing ad-
mirably the role of Villian.
The circus was in charge of Della
Laubengayer, '17, and her assistants,
Jemima Wenley, '16, Florence Len-
festy, '17, Portia Walker, '18, and Em-
ily Loman, '19.
PROF. HOLLISTER DELAYS IN
ANNOUNCING CAST FOR PLAY
Although the cast has been tenta-
tively picked for the Oratorical asso-
ciation's annual play, which will be
"The Servant in the House" this year,
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister is still unwill-
ing to divulge the names of those who
have made good thus far. Three or
four parts have not been satisfactorily
filled as yet, and as a number are still
trying out, Professor Hollister feels
that he would be doing the candidates
an injustice to announce a definite
cast, with the possibility that it might
be changed later.

Prof. Louis C. Karpinski, of the
mathematics department, will give a
simultaneous chess exhibition at the
meeting for the Chess club in room
401, University hall, Winight. Profes-
sor Karpinski will first play 12 simul-
taneous games with various members
of the club and will thenr play one
game without seeing the board; that
-is, he will play blindfolded. Every-
one interested will be welcome at the
meeting.
Two intercollegiate correspondence
matches will be played this year, one
with Harvard and one with Ohio State
university. The first moves in both
matches will be made tonight and the
team which will play Ohio State will
be chosen. In both matches five games
will be conducted, the moves in each
game being sent by mail every Satur-
day night. The matches will last until
June, when such games as are not fin-
ished will be decided by the American
Chess Bulletin.
The members' chess tournament will
be started the first part of December.
Anyone may enter. Three prizes will
be awarded to the winners at the end
of the year. Those attending the meet-
ings are requested to bring a board
and men if possible.

WHAT'S GOING ON

a

i

I

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION STS.
SUNDAY, 10:30 A. M.
LEONARD A. BARRETT speaks
Theme-"Social Redemption"-as illustrated in the character of Jean
Valjean in "Les Miserables."
University Bible Classes at Noon

TODAY
Fresh lit dance, Barbour gym, 2:30
o'clock.
Michigan Union dance, Michigan
Union, 9:00 o'clock.
Upper Room Bible class meets, 444
South State street, 7:00 o'clock.
Class football, south Ferry Field,
10':00 o'clock: Seniors laws vs.
Dent:.
Chess club meets, 401 N. W, 6:15
o'clock.
Craftsman club meets, Masonic tem-
ple, 7:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
David R. Porter speaks, "Y" U. hall
meeting, 6:30 o'clock.

I le uenher o szI'ladvrti
ZShci 1 is I3i t cei' li f" ith 1e
' ~ Ociu'sdeandsf-. Are You

-

I

* * - * * * * ~ * * *

State Championship Football Game.
Detroit Cent. High School vs. Ann Arbor HiCh cool
Ferry Field Today, 2:00 P. M. Admission 50e

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