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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 19, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

Foreign Publications---Books---Flonzaley Quartette

The Advertisers Club

I

FLONZALEY QUARTET WILL
RETUR N TO ANN ARBOR
SECOND CHORAL UNION NUMBER
IS GIVEN TUESDAY EVENING,
NOVEMBER 23

Princeton Has Most Outside Students
) According to figures compiled by
Professor Burg, of Northwestern uni-
versity, Princeton is the most cosmo-
politan of universities, only one-fifth
of her students coming from New Jer-
sey. Cornell leads all universities in
the number of students from insular

The reappearance of the Flonzaley
Quartet in Ann Arbor, after several
year's absence, will be cause for re-
joicing by all who have heard them,,
and by all others who realize that they
will have an opportunity to hear the
purest and most beautiful form of
music interpreted by four exponents
who are now universally recognized as
unique.

The program which these artists
have selected for their Ann Arbor con-
cert leaves notliing to be desired.
Lesar Franck's Quartet is a sadly ne-
glected work of exquisite beauty-ne-
glected largely because an adequate
presentation of its ethereal loveliness
[s excessively difficult. The three
pieces by Strawinsky are still in man-
uscript, and may be anticipated with
the keenest interest. Two years ago
the Flonzaleys introduced Schoenberg's
Quartet--a most obstruse, ultra-mod-
ern composition of an hour's duration;
their success with this almost impos-
sible task was practically universal.
They have the courage of their con-
victions! Strawinsky is said to "out-
Schoenberg, Schoenberg;" but if the
(Continued on Page Six)

,

and non-contiguous territories, fol-
lowed closely by Michigan and the Uni-
versity of California.
NOVEMBER EOITION OF
ENGINEERBOOK ON SAL.
* - - --_ *
CONTAINS ARTICLES BY PROF. I.
1D. PARKER, R. R. TINKHAM AND1
F. G. MARSTELLER
With several articles of more than
ordinary interest to the engineer, the
unavoidably delayed October number
of the Michigan Technic, which was
put on sale yesterday, is easily one of
the best ever issued. j
One of the most significant articles
is the one on "The Inductive Effects of
a 140,000 Volt Transmission Line," by
Prof. R. D. Parker, '05E, of the elec-
trical engineering department, now on
leave of absence. In h,; article Pro-
fessor Parker gives an account of the
interference trouble caused by the
140,000 volt 3-phase transmission line
of the Au Sable Electric company
which parallels the telegraphic cir-
cuits of the Western Union Telegraph
company and the Detroit & Mackinaw
R. R., between East Tawas and Pin-1
conning, Michigan. The close con-
junction of the power line and the tel-
egraph lines gave rise to large elec-
trical disturbances in the telegraphic
circuits. Professor Parker was one of
the engineers requested to investigate
the matter.
Ralph R. Tinkham, '05E, also con-
tributes an article on, "Notes on Ri-
parian Rights and Boundaries." In it
is developed the method of determining
riparian boundaries on a concave
shore, a method little known because
of its limited application.
The "Relation Between Science and
Industry in Germany, and the United
States," is taken up in a contribution
by Fritz G. Marsteller, '16E, in which
the writer outlines the need of state
or government laboratories such as
are maintained in Germany for the as-
sistance of the farmer, the building
contractor, the mechanic, and most im-
portant of all, the intelligent inventor.
A full line of Hawaain Records at
Grinnell Bros., 166 South Main St.
Phone 1707 for delivery service.

NOTED METALLURGIST IS
TO SPEAK NOVEMBER 29
PROF. THOMAS WEST LECTURES
ON "STRUCTURES OF METALS"
TO GENERAL PUBLIC
Of interest to all students of the
chemistry and engineering classes as
well as to the faculty in general, is the
announcement made of the coming to
Ann Arbor of one of the greatest
metallurgists of the present day, This
is Prof. Thomas West, professor of
metallurgy at McGill university, Mon-
tral, who will speak on "Structure of
Metals," on the night of November 29,
under the auspices of the Phi Lambda
Upsilon society.
Professor West is a graduate of an
English university, and has been edu-
cated under the most prominent metal-
lurgists of England, most of his work
having been done under Carpenter He
is personally acquainted witb ftead,
Hatfield, Desch, and other men whose
work in the field of metallurgy has
won them world-wide renown.
The talk will be given in room 165
of th : chemistry building, and will be
open to the general public. The hour
. ill be announced later.
THE NEW BOOKS
"Public Utility Economics" is the
title of a book published by the West
SIde Y. M. C. A. of New York. It con-
tains 10 chapters, each one of which is
a summary of a lecture dlivered by
experts before the Financa Forum of
the society mentioned above.
The book is many-sided. and not at
all confined to any one particular
phaje of the problem of public utili-
ties. This is clearly seen in the titles
of the chapters. Some of the subjects
dealt with are: Municipal ownership
and public utilities, progress of the
science of lighting, and some legal
aspects of the regulation of the pub-
lie service commissions.
This book is worth while, not so
ruch because of the information it
contains, but rather because through
the medium of this work the New York
Y. M. C. A. is getting in close touch
with a great number of young men
whom it could reach in no other man-
ner.
Pianos to rent. Prices and pianos,
right, at Schaeberle & Son's Music
House, 110 South Main street. oct8tf

deal.

The DAILY recommends them.

deserve your, support.

Ann Arbor Press,
Arcade Theater.
Ann Arbor Savings Bank.
Andres, 0. G.
Allen, N. F. Co.
Allmand and Forsythe.
Allmendinger Music Shop.
Arnold and Co.
Brooks Brothers, X. Y.
Busy Bee.
Betsy Ross Shop
Bischoff, Geo.

Moe, Geo., Athletic Goods.
Moran School of Shorthand.
Mayer-Schairer Co.
Malcolm, J. K.
Majestic Billiard Hall.
Maedel, G. C.
Major and Co.
Mack and Co.
Michigan Inn
Marquardt, Arthur.
Mann Drug Store.
Morrill, O. D.
Majestic Theater.

They are all reliable,

Bloomfield, A. J.
Burchfield and Co.
Bancroft, "Pop."
Bull Durham Tobacco.

O'Connor and Co
Orens, Cafeteria

and in dealing with them you will get a square

We present below the list of DAILY ad-
vertisers. These men support the DAILY, and

MANY FOREIGN PUBLICATIONS
COME TO UNIVERSITY LIBRARY
More than 30,000 pieces of mail are
received annually at the desk in the
periodical room of the General Li-
brary. This mail is composed of mag-
azines and periodicals from all over
the world.
'By far the greatest number of for-
eign magazines come from Germany.
Some of them deal with purely general
and literary subjects, but the majority
are scientific and philosophical pub-
lications. Next in number are' the
French magazines. A number of these
are beautifully illustrated. Almost ev-
ery European nation of importance is
represented by at least one magazine,
while many send six or seven excel-
lent publications.
In former years, a number of for-
eign newspapers could be found on the
racks, but since the opening of the
war the London Times has been the
only European newspaper which con-
tinues to send its issues. The French,
Russian, Greek, German, Italian and
Polish papers that the library receives
are published in America.

Bonwit, Teller Co.
Crystal Restaura .t
Cousins and Hall.
Chapman, J. L., o;eweler.
Calkins Pharmacy.
Co-Op Tailors.
Cluett, Peabody Co., Arrow
Collars.
Conklin Pen Co.
Corbett, Tom, Clothier.
Detroit, Jackson and Chicago
R. R.
Detroit Edison Cc.
Davis and Ohlingcr.
Daines and Nickles.
Dean and Company.
Davis, S. 0.
Demuth, Wm. Co., Pipes and
Smokers' Supplies.
Delta, The.
Eastern Michigan Edison Co.
Eberbach and Co.
Frank Brothers.
Factory Hit Store.
Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank.
Fatima Cigarettes.-.
Flanders Clothing Shop.
Flanders Floral Shop.
First National Bank.
Grinnell Brothers.
Ganzle, Albert, Tailor.
Grennen, D. 'E., Tailor.

Packard Academy.
Pezzies Barber Shop.
Purfield, Win., Shoes.
Quarry Drug Co.
Reule, Conlin, Fiegle Co.
Randall and Pack.
Rentschler.
Ramers Chocolates.
Renellen Hospice.
Riz- La Crcix Papers.
Rowe's Laundry.
Sheehan and Co.
Schaeberle and Co.
Spalding Brothers.
Schlanderer and Seyfried.
Stick and Woodberry.
Sugar Bowl.
Schleede, I. F.
Students' Supply Store.
Switzer Hardware Co.
Sauer Lumber Co.
Schumacher Hardware Co.
Stark Taxi Co.
Swain, G. R.
Tinker and Co.
Tice Drug Co.
Theater Magazine.
Tuxedo Tobacco.
Tuttle's Lunch 'Room.
Universal Transportation Co.
U. of M. Boat Livery.
University Music House.

I i

i -Y
- .
Copyright Hart Schaffner_ & IYU'S

Varsity Six
Hundred
JF you want the snap-
p e s t overcoat you
ever put your frame into,
you'll get one of Hart
Schaffner & Marx Var-
sity Six Hundred Mod-
els. They're n e w in
idea, and new in the
smart little touches of
style which makes .9
clothes distinctive, and
unusual.
Come and see the new over-
c o a t s ; there's nothing like
them anywhere else. At $25.
you'll see some very rich fab-
rics; and very smart styles.

Goodyear, Wi. Co.
Goodyear Drug Co.
Goldman Brothers.

German American Savings Bank.
Gross, Fred.
Garrick Theater, Detroit.
Hamilton Business College.
Huston Brothers.
Henry and Co.
11aller, Martin, Furniture.
Haller Jewelry Co.

Varsity Toggery.
Velvet Tobacco.
Wild and Co.
Wadhams and Co.
Wahr's Book Store.
Wahr's Shoe Store.
Walkover Shoe Co.
Wai King Loo.
Washtenaw Cas Co.
Weinberg's.

Hoppe, O. F.

I

Lutz Clothing Store
The Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes

Kempf, R. W.
Kollauf, J. W.
Kidd, C. I.
Lutz Clothing Co,
Lyndon, A. S.
Lyon and Healey Co.
Lindenschmidt, Apfel Co.

OMITTED BY ERROA
Bond St., Clothiers.
Famous Shoe Repairing Co.
Wagner & Co., Clothiers.

Whitney Theater.
Wiley, Chas. D.

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