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November 19, 1915 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-19

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THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
TIHE CAMPUS

The

M.ich igan

Phones :-Editorial 2414
TELE I Business 960
D a ll- TLEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NW YORK SUN

_.. - ,-.

VOL. XXVI. No. 40.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

IHIGAN TO HAVE
POTRY CLUB SOON
Noyes, Markham, Kowells, Kipling and
Others Will Deliver
Addresses
TO ORGANIZE ON WEDNESDAY
Michigan is to take the lead among
universities in organizing a Poetry
club. E. N. Hyatt, '17, is behind the
movement, which has the support of
Prof. T. E. Rankin, Dr. H. S. Mallory
and Mr. L. L. Bryson, of the rhetoric
The purps of the club, as stated by
Hyatt, is t rvie student interest in
I terature, and to bring prominent
writers to An. Arbor. Heretofore, no
cfort has been made to have men of
letters speak here, and the club will
bi to the university such writers
a Edwin Markham, Richard Le Gal-
lieno, Alfred Noyes, Edith Wharton,
William Dean Howels, Rudyard Kip-
ling, and James Whitcomb Riley.
The initial meeting of the club will
be held at 4:00 o'clock Wednesday af-
ternoon in room 203, Tappan hall. All
students and members of the faculty
who are interested in literature are in-
vited to be present at this meeting. It
is the intention to have the club affil-
-ated with the Poetry Society of Am-
erica, of which all prominent American
writers, and several well known Eng-
lish authors are members.
Hyatt has already received letters
from Markham, Le Gallienne and John
G. Neidhardt, stating that they will be
in Ann Arbor from December 5 to 15,
and it is expected that one of the best
known American women novelists will
be here at that time.
If the movement is successful here,
as it is expected to be, an attempt will
be made to organize similar clubs at
other large universities. A circuit will
then be established and the writers will
make tours, speaking at all universi-
ties where such clubs are organized.
ROUND-UP CLUB WILL HOLD
NOVEMBER DANCE AT GRANGER
Round-Up club will hold its Novem-
ber dance at Granger's tonight from
9:00 to 1:00 o'clock. During the even-
ing the men will hold a get-together
for the purpose of promoting the so-
cial interests of the organization. Sev-
eral feature dances have been planned
by the committee in charge.
NATIONAL MEDICAL SOCIETY
COMMENDS CHICAGO DOCTOR
New York, Nov. 18.-The Medico Le-
gal society has sent a commendatory
resolution to Dr. Haselden for refus-
ing to prolong the life of the defective
Bollinger baby in Chicago. Oscar J.
Smith, who offered the resolution, said
the refusal of Dr. Haiselden to per-
form an operation was not only saving
the child misery but saving society the
responsibility of caring for it.
MICHIGA N RIFLEMEN PRACTICE
ON THEIR NEW INDOOR RANGE
In preparation for the annual inter-
collegiate rifle matches to be held in
the spring, Michigan riflemen are busy
practicing on their new indoor range.
In the coming season Michigan expects
to place high in class "B," and from

scores that are being made every day
prospects seem bright: Ammugiition
may be obtained from Ray Van Doren
for indoor shooting at the following
prices: Peters' ammunition, 25 cents
per 100, and the government ammuni-
tion for 17 cents per 100 rounds.
August Wilhelm Escapes Internment
New York, Nov. 18.-Officers of the
United Fruit steamship Tartutuero, in+
today from Santa Marto, reported that
while she was at Santa Marto on the
night of November 11 an interned+
Hamburg-American liner, Prinz Au-
gust Wilhelm, pulled up and departed.
The German-American ship had been
detained in the port at anchor since
the beginning of the 'war, fearing to
go out because British cruisers were
waiting for her beyond the three-mile
limit. Captain Drake of the Tortu-
tuero said the fleeing vessel was head-a
ed in the direction of Haiti.,

SPHINX INITIATES 10 J-ITS
Mlembers of lass of 1917 Initated Into
Secrets of Great Stone
Face
Across the "burning sands of the
Sahara" came Sphinx, junior lit hon-
oary society Wednesday afternoon, an-
nexing 10 members of the class of 1917,
and initating them into the secrets of
the great stone face.
After the initiation the new men
were entertained at a dinner at the
members, together with representa-
tives from the faculty, responded to
toasts.
The initiates were T. S. Cox, W. T.
Adams, A. J. Gornetsky, L. S. Arentz,
W. D. Nance, W. A. Niemann, J. C. B.
Parker, E. E. Pardee, T. C. Reid and
V. E. Burnett.
J R C I NF IRST .MEETING TODAY
Elections of Secretary and Treasurer
and Plans for Hop Will Feat-
ure Day's Work.
Chairman Edward E. Mack, '17, has
called the first meeting of the J-Hop
committee, which will be held at the
Union at 7:30 o'clock tonight. The
members will elect a secretary and
treasurer, and will start the work of
planning for the Hop.
At a meeting yesterday afternoon the
junior engineers choose the following
four men to Tepresent them on the
committee: James L. Whalen, Gordon
Smith, Dick B. Gardner, and Louis F.
Dieterich.
"HAVE A HQBBY"-DEAN COOLEY
J-Engineers Hold Regular Assembly
and Short Business Meeting
"Pick a hobby and let it amuse you,"
said D'ean Mortimer E. Cooley to the
junior engineers at their meeting yes-
terday. "I have had such hobbies as
the history of Indian mound builders
in Ohio, and old trails in the big
woods."
"Strive to be capable of amusing
yourself rather than let others do it
for you," were the Dean's remarks in
a talk on the vahe of an avocation.
At the business meeting which pre-
ceded the talk, it was decided that the
president should appoint men to rep-
resent the class on the Technic and a
publicity committee of four men. Two
of these are to serve on The Daily and
two on other publications.
DEAN LLOYD GIVES ADDRESS
TO SOPHOMORES YESTERDAY
Dean A. H. Lloyd in an address be-
fore the sophomore engineering as-
sembly yesterday afternoon, spoke on
the relations of the graduate school to
the university as a whole.
After the address President W. M.
McKee announced the appointment of
the following class committees: Fi-
nance committee, A. Bonney, chair-
man, R. Langley; auditing committee,
E. B. Breckenridge, Ralph E. Page, E.
R. Loveland; social committee, Fred
Hough, chairman, J. D. Hibbard, F. C.
Dudley, A. V. Livingstone, F. C.
VanBrunt; honor committee, C. E.
Briggs, F. C. Kortick. A. J. Goldberg
was appointed chairman of the indoor
baseball team.
The first soph engineering smoker
of the year will be held within two

weeks at the Michigan Union. Speeches
and music will feature the entertain-o
ment.
GERMAN U-BOATS DON'T BLOW
LP SONS FROM FATHERLAND'
Paris, Nov. 18.-Rome correspond-
ents corroborate the report that the.
Italian steamship Milano, a sister ship
of the Firenze, which was torpedoed
last week, was. stopped on the high
seas a few days ago by a submarine.
On ascertaining that there were on
board the Milano 70 Germans who had
been expelled from Egypt, the com-
mander of the submarine permitted the;
steamship to proceed safely.
Dr. Jeffers Dies at Age Seventy-Four
Newark, Pa., Nov. 18.-Doctor Eliak-E
im Tupper Jeffers, president of thei
New York Collegiate Institute, diedt
here today. He was 74 years old.-

FOREIGN STUDENTS
GIVEN RECEPTION
President Harry B. Hutchins and
Deans Receive Foreign Students
in Barbour Gymnasium
PROFESSOR HILDNER CHAIRMAN
"Michigan welcomes you, men and
women of foreign lands. We feel for-
tunate in having you with us." These
were the opening words of greeting
given by President Harry B. Hutchins
to nearly a hundred foreign students
at the annual reception given by the
president and deans of the various
colleges and schcols in Barbour gym-
nasium yesterday evening.
"At one time," President Hutchins
'ontinued, "I feel as though I were in
China and South Africa and Chile. I
do not believe that we are conscious
of the different nationalities represent-
ed here tonight. It is your presence
that is making the University of Mich-
igan an international university. This
cosmopolitan university gives you
great opportunities to learn men and
their different viewpoints, which is
quite as important as to learn from
books."
Prof. J. A. C. Hildner was chairman
of the evening, and before introducing
the student speakers called upon Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley, who spoke cf thCe
possibilities of one universal people,
the significance of which, he said, was
proved by the presence of the foreign
students.
The students were earnest in their
praise of the university and spoke with
enthusiasm of their admiration for
American customs, manners and
ideals. Narayan S. Hardikar, grad.,
from India, expressed his sympathy
with and appreciation of the work of
late Dean Karl E. Guthe. Others to
speak were: Mittsu N. Imake, '18L,
of Japan; William -Robertson.,. dent,
from South Africa; Manuel J. Con-
stain, '19, who comes from Colombia;
Jose M. Hernandez, grad:, of Porto
Rico; Constantine D. Tripolitis, '17E,
a Greek, and Qua Ling Young, grad.,
of China.
William C. Achi, '17L, sang his fa-,
vorite production, "Men of Michigan,
while native songs were offered by
Armando D. Cusicanqui, '17, a Boliv-
ian, and Carlos Zanelli, '19E, Chile.
H. S. Feizy, '18E, Turkey, and Pei
Chien Yang, '18, China, played several
piano solos, Yang carrying his Chinese
instrument with him.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE STAGES CIRCUS
400 People Take Part in Annual Show
Held This Afternoon
At 4:00 o'clock today will come the
parade of the fifth annual circus of
the Women's league, with more than
400 people from the different classes
taking part. The women of the uni-
versity and Ann Arbor in general will
be the spectators.
Jemima Wenley, '16, Florence K.
Lenfesty, '17, Portia Walker, '18, and
Emily Loman, '19, will lead the vari-
ous class stunts..
At the refreshment booths dough-
nuts made by Dean Myra B. Jordan
will be sold, in addition to the cus-
tomary lemonade, candy and'popcorn.
WILSON NOT TO INCLUDE FULL
REVENUE PROGRAM IN MESSAGE

Washington, Nov. 18.-President Wil-
son does not expect to include a com-
plete revenue program in his annual
message to congress. The president
will content himself at that time with
setting forth the needs of the govern-
ment, particularly with reference to
the army and navy. But he will leave
it to congress to decide what meas-
ures shall be resorted to in order to
provide needed revenue.
Penrose Will Throw Hat in 1916 Ring
San Antonio, Texas, Nov. 18.-Boise
Penrose, United States senator from
Pennsylvania, states that .he would be
a candidate for the Republican nomi-
nation for the presidency in 1916, but
refused to discuss his plans beyond
saying that he would make a formal
announcement later. Mr. Penrose was
in San Antonio as one of the party es-
corting the Liberty bell from the Pa-
cific coast to Philadelphia.

PROFAHKER TALKS
I TiS ENGINEERS
i "Devotion to Work," Subject of Talk.
Pres. H. H. Phillips Names
Committees
14 COMMITTEES ANNOUNCED
"Devotion to your work and to your
fellow worker is the factor which
makes more for success than any
other personal 'characteristic," de-
clared Prof. John C. Parker, head
of the electrical engineering depart-
ment, to the senior engineers at their
assembly yesterday.
"Isay devotion, as opposed to
duty," continued Prof. Parker. "De-
votionas springing from the heart
and duty from the mind. Duty' has
a hard sound and the world is at
odds with the idea of love of work.
'Devotion' on the other hand has a
beauty and appeal and includes the
love of the worker for the work."
Prof. Parker who has recently come
from a position at the head of the
Rochester Railway and Light, Roch-
ester, N. Y., has had the employing
of about 150 college graduates. He
has kept these men under observa-
tion and he declares that devotion
to the work and to the workman be-
side him is the biggest fator that
has led to graduates promoton. He
said in conclusion, "If you can get
the right idea of devotion you will
have a big ideal operating through-
out your professional life and true
happiness will result."
President Appoints Committees
At the regular business' meeting
which preceeded the talk a quantity
of new business was considered and
appointments of committees were an-
nounced.
They are as folows:
Auditing-J. M. Brown, chairman.;
W. A. eichle, J. D. Todd.
Banquet - H. C. Buell, chairman;
P. E. Bond, R. E. Bement, J. W.
Robinson, R. A. Hall.
Cane - G. B. Smith, chairman;
J. L. Weymeyer, R. A. Lundell, J.
H. Schmidt, B. Woodbury. .
Cap and Gown-H. J. Smith, chair-
man; D. E. Gardner, L. S. Monroe,
T. P. Soddy, A. F. Grenell.
Picture-L. E. Wilcoxen, chairman;
C. R. Daugherty, C. Bottije, H. E.
Barrett.
Memorial-F. T. Mack, chairman;
A. A. Burrell, M. A. DelValle, P. C.
Wagner, R. E. Gore.
Finance-M. S. Reed, chairman; R.
(Continued on Page Six)
CHICAGO LAWYERWILL
SPEAK ATUIONSUNDAY
John Maxey Zane, '84, to Address First
of Weekly Meetings; Arrange
for Popular Speakers
John Maxcy Zane, '84, one of Chi-
cago's most brilliant lawyers, has
been secured for this week's Sunday
program at the Union, the first of the-
weekly meetings which are to be held
every Sunday afternoon at 3:00 o'clock
at the Union during the winter. The
meeting will be informal and a spe-
cial musical program has been ar-
ranged.
The Union has been very fortunate
in securing Mr. Zane. He graduated
from the University of Michigan in

1884, and is the author of a book on
the law of banks and banking, and of
several articles in the law reviews of
the country.
Mr. Zane has been an active and
loyal alumnus of the university, re-
sponding to every call from her and
receiving the degree of LL.D. in 1914,
Last year he and a fellow alumnus,
Frank F. Reed, of Chicago, gave 15
valuable etchings of great jurists to
the Law school which are now hanging
in room C of the law building. He has
also contributed $1,000 toward the
Union building campaign fund.
Arthur Torrey, '16, chairman of the
Union Sunday program committee, is;
making arrangements to bring many
popular speakers to Ann Arbor to talk
at Sunday" meetings during the win-
ter. Abraham Hart, '17, will be re-
sponsible for the musical programs,
and Alvin M. Bentley, '16, is chairman
of the finance committee

NAME UNION DANCE COMMITTEE
kTo Give Thanksgiving Dance at
Union Tliursd.y
Afternoon

Prof. John E. Enswiler and Mrs.
Emswiler, and Dr. Howard H. Cum-
mings and Mrs. Cummings, will chap-
erone this week's membership dance at
the Union Saturday evening. The
dance committee has been appointed
as follows: Macdonald Reed, '16, chair-
man, John Langs, '17, Russel Stearns,
'16, Bernard Beamwn, '18, and E. E.
Pardee, '17.
There willbe a special Thanksgiving
Day membership dance at the Union
on Thursday afternoon. Tickets at 50
cents, and will go on sale at 1:00
o'clock next Tuesday. The chaperones
and dance committee will be announc-
ed in the near fifture.
DONOR OFrBRBOUR GYM
SI TE LAND TO UNION
Anticipate No Trouble in Raising
Last $50,000 of Union
Fund
Michigan's Detroit alumni are add-
ing real estate to their other cntribu-
tions to the Union fund. Mr. Levi
Barbour, '63-'65L, who was formerly
a regent of the university, has deeded
to the Union property on the west side
of the city valued at $1,000. In addi-
tion to this gift, Mr. Barbour has of-
fered to give the last $1,000 necessary
to the rounding out of the Union build-
ing fund. It was Mr. Barbour who gave
the gymnasium to Michigan and his
latest gift shows that he still has aI
most active lnterestdin his Alma -Mater.
Other donations have been made b
the Detroit alumni as announced Wed-
nesday. Among the cheerful givers
were'the names of LemW. Bowen and
his four sons, one of whom will grad-
uate with the class of 1916.
Confidence is expressed by the com-
mittee in Detroit that the $250,000 will
be raised in the near future. The re-~
mainder of the first $200,000 is likely
to be raised within the next 10 days,
according to reports, and the last $50,-
000 may be pledged with less trouble
than any other part of the prescribed
amount, as there are already indica-
tions of heavy contributions.
MANY DROP FROM HOSPITAL BOAT
English Steamer Anglia Carrying
Wounded Sunk by Mine
in Channel
London, Nov. 18.-The sinking of the
Anglia, although the first case in the
war of a hospital ship meeting disas-
ter while carrying wounded, has
caused great anxiety to the public
mind, as it had been supposed :hat
the English channel was entirely free
of danger from mines.
The Anglia had 200 cot cases aboard.
When the rescuing vessels reached
her she was badly down by the head1
and her propellers were racing. Her
stern was so high above the sea that,
one of the rescuing vessels was able
to pass under her and 40 men dropped
aboard.
Stanley Wilson Will Lead Freshmen1
U. Stanley Wilson, '16, leader of the
Varsity Glee club, has been obtained
by the freshmen to lead their glee and
mandolin club this year. The mem-
bers of the yearling organization wish
to announce that all freshmen are eli-
gible to the club, not only students -of
the literary college, as was supposed
by many of the engineers.

ALLIES THREAgTEN
GREEGE TO GAIN
ALIA9NCE IN WAR
COMBINED FRENCH AND BRITISH
TROOPS WIN VICTORY OVER
BLLGARS
ALLIES HOLD WAR COUNCIL
Italian .Cabinet . War . Council . Again
Convoked. . Important Develop-
ments Expected
entente po v'ers threaten Grecian gov-
er-nment in order to secure alliance.
Denis Cochin, , rench representative,
holds conference with Constantine, King
of Greece.
British and French driving back Bid-
gars in southern Serbia, but Franco-
Serb troops lose ground. Bulgars force
Prilip and Babuna Pass, and threaten
Monastir. British attack near Messines
(Belgium) foiled. Italian towns bom-
barded by Austrian planes.
London, Nov. 18. -- Strong coercive
measures have been leveled at the
Greece government by the British and
French, in order to force the wavering
kingdom into joining the Allies. It
is understood that the offer of the
island, Cyprus, is still offered Greece
as the reward for alliance.
Denis Cochin, the French special
representative in the Balkins, has been
in conference with King Constantine
today, and states that he has fully ex-
plained to the monarch the Allies' pos-
ition,

Greek Border Scene of Allies' Victory
London, Nov. 18.-Combined French
and British troops have been victor-
ious over the Bulgar invaders in Ser-
bia, at points near the Greek border.
Earlier reports state that divisions
of the combined French and Serbian
troops have been driven back after the
Bulgars had stormed Babuona Pass.
The invaders have also taken Prilip,
and are now seriously imperiling Mon-
astir.
France Stops Shipments to Greece
Paris, Nov. 18.-A dispatch from
Marseilles states that the French gov-
ernment has ordered the port author-
ities of France to refuse permission for
any shipments to Greece.
British Surprise Foiled at Messine#
Berlin, via London, Nov. 18.-The
war office announced today that a
surprise attack attempt by British
forces near Messines failed. The sur-
prise was planned to take effect again-
st German positions on the road be-
tween Messines, in Belguim, and Ypres
and Armentieres, south of Messines.
Attempts made by the French in the
rgonne to explode a mine in a German
trench were also foreseen by the Ger-
mans and frustrated. The Germans
vacated the endangered spot in time.
Verona and Polune Shelled From Sky
Paris, Nov. 18.-According to a re-
port from Rome, the city of Verona has
again been attacked by hostile air
craft, while 28 were killed and 30 ser-
iously injured by the aerial bombard-
ment of Nov. 14. Today the only casu-
alty was a slight injury to a little girl.
Slight damage was done to streets and
buildings.
Italian Cabinet War Council Meets -
Rome, Nov. 18.-The Italian cabinet
war council was again convoked this
afternoon. Exceedingly important de-
velopments are expected. Anniounce-
ments of intended actions isto be de-
layed until the Italian military leaders
find out the full negotiations of the
entente allies with Greece. The cor-
respondent is informed that the cab-
inet will be certainfas not to proclaim
a state of war witli Germany.

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

TODAY
Woman's League Circus, -
Gym, 4:00 o'clock.

Barbour

Webster society meets, Webster hall,
7:30 o'clock.
Jeffersonian society meets, Jeffer-
sonian hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Catholic Students' club meets, St.
- Thomas hall, 8:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Fresh lit dance, Barbour gym, 2:30
o'clock.
Michigan Union dance, Michigan

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Ad IV. Riter says:--
Thff habit of "reading the ads
is ' valuable asset. The habit
o' 'heeding the ads' is an inval-
/uable asset."
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Union, 9:00 o'clock.

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