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November 16, 1915 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-16

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THE DAILY

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$2.50
NW OF THE WORLD AND
Ti E CAMPUS

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The

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i igan

t)ail-Y

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXV1. No. 37.
FOOTBAL OE
IN WATERMNGY
TllNIGH'S EYE
,YAMES I. SCIRAEM RI ORN W
SPEAK AND WILL AWARD)
"«" CERTIFICATES
1916 CAPTAIN ANNOUNI
Muslc by Musical ('Cubs and BI
Speches by Froi, liidner
-- and Vmiceii iougas
James Schermerhorn, editor of
Detroit Time;, will be the big fi
in the third annual football sm
to be hced in Waterman gymnasiui
:00 o'clock Wanight. With 'the
lause of lest year still ringing in
cwr:: he will be back to dnoust
the aM preciation of the campus for
1915 Varsity regardless of the di
trimus seasn.
The Detroit editor scored a big
at last year's smoker and the
gram committee feels confident
he will be o hand tomorrow n
with one of the peppiest speeche
the year. After his speech he
make the presentation of the coy
M" certificates.
The doors of Earbour gymnas
will be swung open at 7:00 o'
prompt and until 7:30 the stud
will gather in their pipes and toba
The Michigan band will be on han
furnish a good supply of music du
the refreshment periods.
The Glee club will lead a nun
of college songs, and in additio
this the Michigan Concert Qua
composed of H. L. Davis, '17; F.
Grover, '18; Chase B. Sikes, '16,
Harry Carlson, '17, will give a n
her of popular selections. The q
tet provd to be cue of the big
tures in the Band-Cer-Tainment
weeksago.
Prof. J. A. C. lildner, of the Ger
department, will speak 'in behal
the faculty. He will give a gen
talk on Michigan traditions and
standards of the University.
Werner Scroeder, '16L, will ch
pion the cause of the student 1
when he speaks on the subj
"Michigan's Thanksgiving."
One of the interesting addition
this year's program will be an
dress by Coach Douglass of the
Fresh, who will speak on Michi
chances for next year. Douglass
also announce names of the memn
of the All-Fresh squad who ar
receive their numerals.
The refreshment committee has
ply provided for the crowd that
swarm Waterman gymnasium ton
having secured 40,000 Omar cigare
doughnuts, cider, pipes and Bull I
ham smoking tobacco and tin-
with the team picture on them.
The captain for the season of
probably will be announced at
smoker, as a meeting of the :
ball squad is scheduled to be
sometime during the day. At p
ent no official list of the men whc
to receive their "M's" has been g
out.
The ticket sale has been excep
ally good, according to those
charge, and as has been customa
is expected that a large numbe

students will purchase their tickel
the gymnasium door tonight.
Committeemen for the smoker
to report at the gymnasium w
ever possible during the day to
in arrangements.
ROUNDUP CLUB HOLDS ANNUA
FALL INITIATION AT Ut
The Roundup club held its an
fall initiation last night at the Ui
Plans for the usual November d
were discussed, and it was finally
cided to hold it at Granger's next
day night.
The men initiated were: Bruner
niman, '18; Louis C. Andrews, '17
R. Black, '16; Barnard Boyd, '17A;
Trun, '17M; Walter Kelly, '16; Ju
Boucher, '19M; W. E. Code, 16E; 1l
*Publow, '16A; J. M. Frasier, '171
Wilson Robinson, '16E; Alton L.
pien, '19H; L. G. Steele, '16D; ]
McDonald, '16D; G. E. Madison,
J. R. McNutt, '16M, and J. G. Milli
'16E.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENT

---- -

_

DRUIDS INITIATE 10 AWENYDS
Banquet Tendered New Men at Union
Last Night
Druids, senior lit honorary society,
yesterday chose 10 seniors and collect-
ed them around the Druid Rock, in
front of the Museum. After the in-
itiation the newly-elected members
were banqueted at the Union.
The initiates are as follows: H. M.
Warner, G. Murphy, A. C. Martons, J.
M. Cork, J. A. Heist, F. S. Baer, A. H.
Torrey, B. M. Compton, C. B. Sikes
and I. C. Johnson.
UNION TO HOLD NNUAL
FORUM TOMORROW NIGHT
"Compulsory Militiry Training" Will
be the Subject for Oen
D)iscus sin
"Compulsory Military Training" will
be the subject open for general discus-
sion at the first Forum of the year
to be held at the Union at 7:30 o'clock
tomorrow night. Harry D. Parker, '16L,
will have charge of the meetings this
year, and plans to have all the import-
ant camp-us questions discussed during
the year's programs,
The Forum will last but for one hour
and any student on the campus can
express his ideas on the question be-
fore the Forum. Informality will be
the keynote of the meetings.
The idea of a Forum was inaugu-
rated by the Michigan Union last year,
because there was no plae in student
affairs where vital and pressing cam~-
pus problems could be discused.
It is planned to hold a meeting of
the Forum every week until spring
vacation. Speeches will be limited so
as to allow all those present who de-
sire to speak ample opportunity to give
their opinions on the problems.
SENIORS DEMAND TO HAVE
PHOTOS TAKEN FOR YEAR BOOK
List of Michiganensian Photographers
Posted at Various Points
on Campus
Posters have been placed upon the
various bulletin boards about the cam-
pus announcing the names of the pho-
tographers authorized by the Michi-
ganensian board to take the pictures
of members of the senior class. In
designating the official photographers
as early in the year as they have, the
management of the Michiganensian is
catering to the demand of the seniors
to have their pictures made in time
for use as gifts at Christmas, and also
to aid the students in avoiding the ne-
cessity of sitting for their portraits
during the rush of work in the month
of January.
The editorial staff is desirous of se-
curing snapshots of student life and
activities, and as many personal pic-
ttures as can be obtained will be run
in the publication this year Photos
of men and women prominent about
the campus are especially desired.
Believing that the women of the uni-
versity have not been represented in
the year book as they should be, the
management of the annual this year is
willing to devote more space than ever
before to stories and pictures of inter-
est to the student body in general and
to the women in particular. It re-
quests only that the women of the
university supply the necessary infor-
mation by means of communications
or personally to the members of the

staff.
MEMBERS OF CERCLE FRANCAIS
MEET AT HOME OF H. V. WANN
Qercle Francais met last night at the
home of Harry V. Wann, of the French
department and director of the Cercle.
The program consisted of a number
of recitations in French concerning
the war by Charles T. Frisbie, '16, and
a series of games, in one of which
Frisbie and Manuel A. del Valle, '16E,
staged a duel.
J-Engineers Announce Committees
The J-Engineer committees for the
year have been appointed. They are:
Social committee, E. A. Bartelme,
chairman; W. M. Raich, R. Kohr, L.
B. Hadley, W. Brodhead. Auditing
committee, H. L. Carroll, chairman;
J. A. Blecki, D. Dougherty. Finance
committee, R. W. Rose, chairman.

PROFESSOR WIHIKBBSOF FEH A UIA
COMITEWITES ON CU _
S MILIT T NG ASSUR
- ( 'eratin of Meimbers of Varsity
Necessity of Colntribiting to ato 14, ~ g. nMlon hoped For by
lefeIrse of Geanest Vale, . . 1919 C(omnijttee
Mays iobbs-

ADD SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN
TACTICS IN OTHER UNIVERSITIES
MAJOR-GENERAL WOOD SAYS 500
MEN COULD BE SELECTED
AS LIEUTENANTS'
To set at rest the discussions over
the introduction of military training1'
into the university, which have oc-
curred not only on the campus but also
through the -whole state, Prof. William
H. Hobbs has written the following
article:
Having noted that The Daily is to'
encourage communications which dual,
with the plan of introducing military

TO HOLD TRYOUTS NEXT WEEK
That All-Fresh Glee and Mandolin
clts will be organized at Michigan
this year was assured at a meeting of
committees from the freshman classes
held at the Michigan Union last night.
Barred from the Varsity clubs by fac-
ulty action, the yearlings have decided
to form separate organizations and
prepare for membership in igger
clubs next year.
Active work - the format <% of the
clubs will commeuce at once. The
chairmen of the committees are ar-
ranging for tryouts to be held some
time next week, Ow exact dates to be
announced later.

training into the university, I thin, it 11. Stanley Wilson, '16, the leader of
the Varsity Glee club, will have charge
nay contribute to intelligent discus- of the tryouts for the Glee club, and
sion if, as secretary of the committee will doubtless direct the club later.
whose report has been adopted by the An effort is being made to secure O.
Senate, I state some of the objects O. Leininger, '16D, to take charge of
which it is hoped to secure under the the Mandolin club.
plan proposed. Paul W. Eaton, '19, Ralph H. Wat-
Physical T'rining One Object kins, and Kemp Keena, '19, comprise
Certain of these objects were admir- the committee on the formation of the
ably summed up by ex-President Taft Glee club, while Carl M. Gingrich, '19,
in the interview published in your is- Athol B. Thompson, '19, and Cecil W.
sue of Sunday. Military training, Mr. I Miller, '19, are acting in a similar ca-
Taft says, tends toward democracy in pacity for the Mandolin club. If hard
athletics. "In this way everyone will work will bring results, the success
receive physical training, where now of the project is assured.
the interest is centered in a group and,-
the great mass is allowed to go unno- l)EMO(R'IA'S CONTROL NATIONAL
ticed. Obedience and subordination to IIOUSE BY LARGE MAJORITY
law are taught; and, in general, a bet-
ter-groomed, better-n:annered young Washington, Nov. 15.--Official figures
collegian will be produced." The stu- made public today by South Trimble,
dent who now walks into a professor's clerk of the House of Representatives,
office without knocking and, with hat show that in the new house the Demo-
on head, breaks into conversation, will, crats will have a majority of 34 over
if his manners are not corrected, meet the Republicans and a majority of 25
with a sharp rebuff when later he ap- over all other parties represented in
plies for a position. Large moderr that body. The roll call of the new
business concerns, to be efficiently house will he based upon the compila-
managed, require an organizatior tion made today. The political status
which is essentially military an& is as follows: Democrats, 230; Repub-
where subordination to superiors and licans, 196; Progressives, 7; Independ-
an unquestioning obedience to instruc-- emts, I; Socialists, 1; total, 435.
tions are absolutely esesntial. --
Yet, important as these considera-- Via Forces Le N ;acco and Sonora
tions of physical development and in- Washington, Nov. 15.-Carranza an-
culcation of discipline and good man- nounced today that the Villa forces
ners may be, they are not the prime had evacuated the towns of Naco and
consideration which is held in view in Sonora and that the Carranzistas have
recommending courses in military occupied the; e towns. Col. Cardonos
training. Of first importance is the with 2,000 cavalrymen is stated to be
necessity of contributing to national pursuing the Villa forces, who are re-
defense through the school of the ported to be returning in the direction
soldier and the training of officers. of Villa Verdo.
Mr. Taft's expressed opinion that mili-

TO PUBLISH MILITARY POLICY
Sertayo War W~ ould 1Pub1lsh Ie-E
port of General Staff
Washington, No -. 1,.-Secretary
'Garrison will recommend to President
Wilson that the report of the general
staff of the army, stating what it be-
lieves to be the proper military policy
for the United States, be made public.
This was made known here today.
Secretary Garrison's own recommen-
dation, which has already been made
public, has met with the approval of
the president.
The general staff, it is reported, be-
lieves that the regular army should be
increased to 225,000 men, each one
serving two years with the colors and
four years in the reserve. 7t also rec-
ommends the creation of an auxiliary
force of men with one year's military
training to the total 'number of 1,000,-'
000 men.
NEW YORK'S MAYOR SURViVES
.OPERATION FOR APPENDICITIS
New York, Nov. 15.-Mayor Mitch-
el was operated on successfully for a
severe attack of appendicitois this
afternoon at the Roosev.-It hospital.
A quick and complete recovery is ex-
pected.
500DRESH ITS "ATTNO
FIRST REGULAR SSEMBLY
Dean Efnluger Gives Words of Advice
to First Yeaar Literary Class
at Meeting
"Don't try to invent a new tradition.
Remember that there were others here
before you," was the advice by Dean
J. R. Etinger to nearly 500 members
of the freshmen literary class as-
sembled together yesterday afternoon
in the new science hcildi Jg audi-
torium.
"You are coming into a settled com-
munity when you come to Ann Arbor,
and the same rules of the world that
you knew at home apply here. There
are, of course, some special things in
the college code; for instance, don't
show too much familiarity with the
members of the faculty, by sitting on
the table or desk while addressing
them. Remember that you are in a
college world."
Yesterday's meeting marked the oc-
basion of the first assembly this year
of the 1919 literary class, and from
the unusually large attendance it
looks as if the assembly plan would
meet with favor this year. Both Dr.
J. F. Scott, who has charge of the
assemblies, and Dean Effinger were
enthusiastic at the size of yesterday's
gathering and the interest shown in
the assembly plan. A second assembly
will be held sometime in December, at
which time another speaker, probably
a member of the faculty, will talk to
the first year men and women.
Dean Effinger yesterday emphasized
the developihent of Michigan spirit
and said that it was accomplished
through deparmental rivalry. Michi-
gan spirit, in its true sense, he said,
means the observance of campus am
university traditions. Class loyalty
was, he declared, an indication of loy-
alty to the university and he urged
the class to turn out at the class as-
semblies and meetings.

KISER WILL MAKE
TRIUMPHAL ENTRY,
IN TURK CAPIfTLl
co.mi1'N TO BE HERALD OF NEW
EXPEDITION TO EGYPT AND
THE SUEZ CANAL
BRITISHERS NEARING BAGOAD
Almost 9,000 Serbs Are Captured by
Teutons and Bulgars During
Last 4S. Hours
Rome, Nov. 15.--Dispatches from
Constantinople indicate ghat Kaiser
Wilhelm's arrival in that city will coin-
cide with the departure of a military
expedition for Egypt and the Suez ca-
nal. Great preparations are being
made for the triumphal entry of the
German emperor into the Turkish cap-
ital.
. Travelers arriving from Turkey re-
port that the kaiser will be accomn
panied by Archduke Carl Francis, the
Austrian crown prince, and King Fer-
dinand of Bulgaria. Numerous German
officers are arriving daily at Constan-
tinople, and some are going int Asia
Minor to prepare the way for the new
drive of the Germans into the Orient.
The Teuton activity against Egypt
and the Suez canal will be the first
attempt in that direction, so far as is
known, since early in the war, when
a German force was driven from the
canal territory.
Kaiser 44) Mis from Tehuran
Petrograd (via London), Nov. 15.-
The kaiser already is within 40 miles
of Tehuran and is in command at Yan-
gieme, according to advices received
in Petrograd. The German generals
are following the same lines in Persia
as they did in Bulgaria before that
country joined the central powers.
British Forces Reach Ozzbeah
London, Nov. 15.-British forces
have reached Ozizbeah, 40 miles from
Bagdad, according to information tele-
graphed today by a news agency.
This gives the British forces com-
plete control of about 350 miles of the
Bagdad railway. They control the ter-
ritory along the valley of the Tigris
and the Euphrates from Koweit on the
Persian gulf to Ozizbeah, which, the
(Continued on Page Six)
HD DFUNERAL SERICES.
FROM RESIDENCE TODAY
Mr. Jay B. Oraper, Late Superintend-
ent of University Hospital to
he Buried Today

tary training in colleges will not pre-
pare many young collegians for offi-
cers in the army needs, I think, sonmc FAUT
further explanation. UNION
Contributing to National Defense N
It is true that the main object o;'
the Morrill and Nelson Acts of Con- $31 is Y
gress, under which military inistre- Membe
tion is now given at some fifty-two
incittin in l i nn t t i -

CAMPAIGN FOR
IMAKES PROGRESS
esterday's Total in Life
rships and Additional
Subscriptions

Inst EUtIOnSnciuan
versities, was to pro
officers of a volunt
event of ,war. The
Act was, in fact, p
great Civil War, wL
the young men of I
lessly went to thei
they had not been p
and disciplined and,
led. It was then;
time of peace the U
tary Academy woul
(Continued on
UNITEo ST
HAVE SPI
New York, Nov.

g mios sta e uni----
vide the company "With but one or two exceptions, the
eer army in the entire faculty of the economics depart-
original Morrill memit have taken up life memberships
assed during the with the Michigan Union," was one of
Len thousands of the advance reports given out yester-
he country need- day by Prof. H. E. Riggs, chairman of
r deaths because the faculty campaign committees.
roperly instructed "Prospects look particularly good, and
were not properly I believe every department will be rep-
supposed that in resented as well as the economics de-
nited States Mili- partment after they are thoroughly
oe able to supply canvassed."
Page Six) More than $600 in life memberships
and additional subscriptions were
handed in to Professor Riggs today,
'ATES TO while approxima ely $1,600 was turned
over to the Union authorities last Sat-
urday. Although some of the commit-
IYSTEM tees have hardly started to work, the
earliest reports show that the faculty
heartily endorses the Union and is
15.- The United willing to aid in its expansion.

i

i

Funeral services of, Jay Bradford
Draper, late superintendent of the
university hospital, who was run over
and instantly killed by a street car
last Saturday night, will be held from
the residence, 610 South State street,
at 2:00 o'clock this afternoon: The
Rev. L. A. Barrett of the local Presby-
terian church, and Rev. W. S. Jerome,
of Pontiac, Mr. Draper's former home,
will perform the last rites over the
body.
Mr. Draper was a member. of the
Masons and of the Knights of Pythias.
Pallbearers have been chosen fromn
these two orders. J. E. Beal,
H. W. Nichols, and James Gal-
braith, representing the Masons, an
Hugh Vandawarker of Ypsilanti, on
Woodward and Fr d Heusel, Jr.,/rep-
resenting the Knights of Pythiad, will
be the pallbearers.
A coroner's jury consideredi the. case
yesterday afternoon but as yet the
verdict rendered has n(,t been made
public. It is possiblT that a further
inquest will b. held/to determine the
exact nature of the accident, and to
place the blame for it.
* * * * * * * * * * * *
* Ad W. yiter says:- *
* Mr..Jierchant: You are doing *
a GO! BrSINESS. You may *
w* ;e thie ealer in your line, but *
. i 11hg%"t i UppIfiL iIxy fn Uv

i

i

WHAT'S GOING ON

!

States will have a secret service to
match that of any European nation
within the next twelve months.
The need of such a branch of gov-
ernment, in whose service would be
included men in all walks of life, ac-I
tually engaged in business or the
professions or trades, as is the cus-
tom in Europe, was made obvious by
the activities of the Teutonic agents
here who are said to number 3,000:
To make possible the creation of
such a secret service congress will be:
asked to appropriate a sum reachingr
into the millions.

Out of 15 instructors and professors
approached in the chemistry depart-
ment thus far, 13 have signed up for
life memberships. The system of can-
vassing has been organized on such a
basis that those in charge feel certain
'that the best results will be obtained.
Plans are now in order to make a
"round-up" in the local campaign,
which is under the supervision of D.
R. Ballentine, '16. A canvass of the
town was made several-wveeks ago,
but the committees feel that another
campaign will be well worth their
while.

TOI)A I
Central League debating squad meets,
room 302, N. W., 4:00 and 7:00
o'clock.
J-Architects meeting, room 311 Eng.
building, 4:45 o'clock.
Michigan Union smoker, Waterman
gym, 7:00 o'clock.
Union Forum, Michigan Union, 7:30
o'clock.
Freshman engineering assembly, 348
engineering building, 11:00 o'clock.
Vesper services, Newberry hall, 5:00
o'clock.
Alpha Nu society meets, Alpha Nu
rooms, 7:00 o'clock.
Adelphi society meets, Adelphi rood's,
7:00 o'clock.

*
*
*
*

you a1ne pr 4,1 y 111 o'dQ
MORE BUSINESS by constant-
ly keeping your name before the
student body in The - Michigan
I)aily.
* # * * * * * * * * *

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