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November 14, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

M IGAN DAIt.Y
blished 1890

.......... W

'"

AY HORNING MAGAZINE
PAC~E
Editor.......J. L. Stadeker
Assistant Editors
ompson E. A. Baumgarth

Sunday

forn ing. azinePale

Fort
;lmn
Suntley

Reporters
Golda Ginsburg
Walter R. Atlas
D. Ml. Sarbaugh'

KEYS TO MANY DOORS
there has been much talk of late1
>ut giving the professional man a
ader background of culture in or-
r to minimize the evils of special-
tion. In the discussion, the stu-
it who specializes, not only in a
>fession, but in an even narrower
.d, has been quite lost sight of.
ere are any number of men who,
ile avowedly takling a general cul-
al course, are actually- confining
,mselves almost entirely to one field
learning.
Culture has been defined as an ap-
eciation of the finer values of life,
fact which many of us are apt to
get in personal absorption in our
ecial work. There is a broad field
general knowledge in which a man
y and ought to roam, if he is to
ow life from any angle but his own.
man is a man before he is a student,
d if he is to provide resources with-
himself for after years, he must
ve awakened his intelligence in all
corners. The time will come when
e will not be answered in the terms
one science, and it is wise to hold
one's hand the keys to as many
ors as possible.
he Thrilling Tale
of Oldv o'Hle

STUDENTS HE CHAE
TO HEAR_19REAANAR
RODRIGO H. BONILLA, AUTHOR (F
"SPANISI DAILY LIFE," NOWA AN
INSTRUCTOR HERE

H ow Ann Arbor Got Its Name)

For the first time in some years
students of modern languages in the
university have the opportunity of
learning Spanish under d native Span-
ish teacher, Mr. Rodrigo H. Bonilla.
Mr. Bonilla, who is an accomplished
linguist, speaks English fluently, his
soft Spanish accent giving charm to
the harsh Saxon words, and in con-
versation talks interestingly of condi-
tions here and abroad.
Mr. Bonilla was born in Motilla, Cas-
tile, in 1875, and received his early
education at the Spanish Preparatory
Academy in 1887 and 1891, attending
the State Normal college, Valencia,
from 1891 to 1895. He studied a year
at the Business College of Barcelona
and in 1897 was made an official of ad-
ministration at Madrid.
He received the degree of A. B. at
the University of Madrid in 1901 and
later became professor of Spanish lit-
erature and history at the College of
Calderon de la Barca, Madrid. ,In
1903, he was decorated by the Spanish
government with the order of Alfonso
XIII for his work, "Project of Admin-
istration for a Poor Country." Mr.
Bonilla is also the author of "Spanish
Daily Life," a reader approved by the
board of education of New York state.
He has received the degree of A. M.
from New York university.
Last summer Mr. Bonilla was in-
structor in the language department
of Columbia university, and previous
to this he spent seven years at the
United States Naval academy, Annapo-
lis, where he was senior instructor in
the romance language department.
Mr. Bonilla married an American
girl, Miss Lucy E. Smith, formerly
professor of romance languages and
literature at Cornell college. Mr.
Vernon, Iowa. A pleasant little ro-
mance surrounds their courtship,
which took place while Miss Smith
was studying Spanish under Mr. Bo-
nilla at Madrid. They were married
in January, 1906, and it was after this
event that Mr. Bonilla decided to
make his home in this country.
25 cents--any part of the city. Stark
Taxicab Co., 2255. oct28tf

Did you ever, in your hours of lei-'
sure, stop to wonder how Ann Arbor
got its name? Following is the version
given by .Iohn Quincy Adams Sessions,
a pioneer settler of this region. Mr.
Sessions came here in 1834, 10 years
after the founding of the little settle-
ment.
"The first settlers in this spot were
two men named Allan and Rumsey,
and their wives, who came here in the
fall of 1824. Both families were from
New York state originally, and they
had met by chance in Detroit. They
came here at the beginning of win-
ter, and as a temporary shelter of
scme kind was necessary, the two men
built a lean-to, or 'arbor,' which suf-
ficed until something more substan-
tial could be erected.
"After it had grown to include some
half a dozen dwellings, the matter of
a name for the little settlement arose.
As it happened, the given name of both
* * * * * * * *. , .* * * *
* *
* A, RONDEL *
k -
3 A staunch, true friend awakes in *
* man the soul, *
* removes from it all bounding, *
* wintry wakes;
* And love and hope and joy, in *
life of dole,
* A staunch, true friend awakes :
* *
* Then man again in cheerful, *
* earnest takes
Renewed heart -- and calmly *
* bears the toll
* Of life-the way that spring the *
* earth remakes.
*I *
* The wakened spirit then its joy *
* shall roll *
Forth till its every chord and *
* fibre quakes, *
* And e'en dead strivings toward *
w a buried goal, *
* A staunch, true friend awakes *
* --Alexander Brede, '18. *
* *
'I* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Allan and « Mrs. Rumsey was
'Ann,' and accordingly the name de-
cided upon was Ann's Arbor, as being
reminiscent of the first shelter built
cn the site of the town. This name
was subsequently changed to Ann
Arbor.
"There has been some dispute as to
where this first habitation was erect-
ed," continued Mr. Sessions, "though
until about 20 years ago there was
never any questioning the fact that it,
was on the corner of Ashley and Hu-
ron, one block west of Main street.
The matter will be settled once and
for all when the local chapter of the
Sons of the American Revolution
meets next Tuesday. I don't think
there is any question but that that is
really the place where it was. The
other location, which some seem to
think is the proper one, is somewhere
near the corner of Ann street and
Division."
"Princess Minstr(Is" at the Majestic
"The Princess Minstrels," whose
billing reads, "A Novelty in Black and
,White," and in which eight or nine
girls appear, are at the Majestic the-
ater tomorrow night. They have an
offering which consists of a regular
minstrel's first part which mingles
singing, dancing, music and fun in a
most pleasing manner
1

MISS DORA KEEN FEARS UNC[ SAM H[[PS
NOTHING BUT RE1PORTERSMEFRMOIN
MAKES EXPLORATION TO ALASKA TITREE-FOU lIT 11 OF CHIN AMEN
TO REJUVENATE HERSELF IN, AT UNIVERSiTY SUPPORTED BY
GLACIAL SOLITUDES AMERICAN MONEY
Snow-slides, avalanches, Arctic ex- BOXER INDEMNITY FUND USED
plorations, mountains over 16,000 feet
in height-none of these hold any ter- More than three-fourths of the Chi-
rors for Dora Keen, renowned moun-
tain-climber. The only thing that nese stud.nt.3 at th i ersity of
seems to feaze her in a newspaper re- Michigan are supported wholly or in
porter, at least that's the way it seem- part by the Tsing l ua fund, the gift
ed when a Daily reporter tried to in- of the United States. In 1908, Con-
terview her, However, after much gress authorized the president to do,
persuasion, Miss Keen consented to as he deemed best with the Boxer in
give out the following interesting demnity fund, of which China had at
information: that time paid about one-half. Presi-
"I first went to Alaska for inspira- (ent Roosevelt decided that the un-
tion of soul and rest of body, to get paid amount sho!id Ua returned to
away from the sordid, every-day wor- China. The Chine government
ries, and rejuvenate myself in the thereupon decidd to use tb land to
peace of the wilds and the silence of send Chinese students to Xrnrican
those Alaskan snows. When I heard universities.
that Mt. Blackburn, 16,240 feet high, In 1909 and 191 only enea
had never been climbed before, I de were found to be su iciently irpared
cided to attempt the climb as a test to enter American universities. it
of my moral strength.," was theretore thought v 1 to found
Miss Keen then went on to describe a preparatory school t' jim-ruct the
the engaging of her guides, brave, students In ihe rc ure subjcis and
fearless men, never daunted by their also to acquaint th m with Annrican
adventures and mishaps encountered ustoms. To this end fsing Ina col-
in. their perilous mountain-climbing, lege was formally o eae ii i'eking;
or by the possibility of getting an ice- April 1, 1911.
covered cave with the temperature 16 The college is dil : nto te mid-
degrees below zero. dle school and the 1igh scho the:
In conclusion, Miss Keen said, "I course in each Let four years inI
have discovered that it is always the length. The high -hool faculty is
first step of an undertaking that is composed totally of eran , while
the most difficult When the decision there are several Chie :e iustctors
.s once been made and the task be- in the middle school. Before eiaering
gun, it is not so hard. Anyway, the the middle school dents are com-
question is not whether a thing is pelled to take seve years' work in
hard, it is, 'Is it worth while?' We must Chinese and two Ye s' work in Eng-
have no fear of starting, the way will lish. At present n <rly , t students
open for us once we have entered upon are attending T'ing lua. Mre than
it. This applies not only to mountain 200 na gra o luding
climbing, but to everything in life. We nine girls, are 1i this country.
college women (Miss Keen is a grad- The Chinese Ed! m miusiun has,
uate of Bryn Mawr) must let nothing supervision over eh<tu nts.
frighten us; we must not let circum- ~~ ~
stances govern us; we must make cir- Pollsh Stn e ay
cumstances bend our way." Polonia, thi ' o
And this plucky little fighter of will hold its fi- guar ng of
mountains and fate professes to be the year in M u bab t2:30
afraid of newspaper reporters. Truly, o'clock this steruo % Prof. 8. 1 Zow-
we must be a bad lot! ski, of the engiu og college, and Mr.
L, A. MakiEiski. 1Atcueiox i archi-
Martin guitars, mandolins, ukeleles tecture, will addre. the menbers.
and all musical instruments at Schae-
berle & Son's Music House, 110 South Dancing classes nd private lessons
Main street. oct8tf at the Packard A demy.

4

Most people do not know that Ann
Arbor might have been a city of
world-wide renown today, even with-
out the prominence which it has gain-
ed by being a university center. It
was while inquiries were being made
annent an old windmill out Huron
street, which suggested romantic pos-
sibilities, that this fact came to light.
It is the truth that romance lurks
aunseen in places where you least sus-
pect it. Thousands of people have
passed the Old Windmill near the edge
of town on Huron street, without a
second thought; freshmen have made
it the object of Sunday afternoon,
, strolls, and, in their ignorance ne-
glected even to peer through a chink
into its blaclt depths; co-eds have
merely wondered idly how many girls,
In the arms of their lovers on the lit-
tle balcony which encircles the struc-
ture near the top, have looked out over
the town and watched the moon rise.
They see in it nothing but an ancient
tumble-down windmill which has
stood in the same spot as long as any-
one can remember, and do not even
guess at the secrets which the solemn
creak of its broken* wheel is trying to
tell. It stands back from the road a
little way, in what was once the cen-
ter of a huge country estate Just be-
low it is a valley, deep and muggy,
around the edge of which stands a
row of mammoth willows that give the
apearance of having formed at one
time a fringe about a lake. Such in-
deed was the case. Long ago there
wa a considerable flow of water
through that hollow, supplied by a
s :rip wvich poured forth water clear
as crv\tal, and it was called Crystal
Lake.
The Mysterious Dr. Hale
One day a mysterious Dr. Hale ap-
peared in town, happened to see the
spring, and the next week saw-the
birth of a wonderful plan. In some
magic fashion the spring changed its
policy and now, instead of pure, clear
water, it gave a brackish, brown-col-
ored linid which Mr. Hale pronounced
-after careful .examination-a heal-
ing mineral. He proclaimed it a God-
send. a stroke of good fortune fur-
K nished by Nature to lead Ann Arbor
o xnae and fame. He donated a
bath-house as his share, and proceeded
to advertise the spring as a place giv-
ing water which, if you bathed in it
often eno'xig, would heal any disease
known to science, and he reaped a
harvest huge and vast from people
who came to his sanitarium from all
over the country. In gratitude he pro-
posed the name for the street on which
the Cure-All Palace stood-Bath street
- which is the name it bears to this
day.
'Theilraliign Proes
llis PIoce sn, as f de eibd by one of
the oldest nabitans, was extremely
simople. The bath-house *as illed
with small stal-like ooms in each of
which was a tub. Under the tub, and
connected with it, was a ineclincal
contriv anceThe patient was seat d
in the tub filled with the healing wa-
to s from the spring, and as the water
(Continued on Page Five)

UNIVERSITY NOTICES
The Sons of the American Revol
tion will meet in Newberry hall
7:06 o'clock Tuesday evening.
The Junior architects will meet
Monday afternoon at 4:45 o'clock
room 311, engineering building

Ethel le e li Iiisre Show at the
1iajestle This Week

ATTENTION, STUDES!
on 1 For quick MESSENGER CALL
in last ad on BACK OF TELEPHONE
RECTORY. Phone 795. 4'17E,

see
DI-

.----r
.

WHITNEY
Theatre

dty

Eye.

N

Iv0

I

c
y .
"F.r.

THE MOST CONSPICUOUS SUCCESS OF THE THEATRICAL SEASON

.;

The Original
All Star
Cast
JOSEPH F. SHEEHAN
AS
THA) EUS
MIRTH CARMEN
AS
ARLIN E
ELAINE iDE SELLEM
AS
THE QUEEN
A WI' IiiP EANE~
AS
ROBET AWHITE
DEViLS )OF
e VIP E IN
k i i E 'T'EIN
i~IAEU'ENE t ROWEL
A ORMN

BOSTON ENGLISH OPERA CO. OFFERS
For the First Time Outside of New York and Chicago
THE

ORIGINAL

ALL-STAR REVIVAL

OF THE

moolmomobA
13 1

HNi

I

A!

,T

no

FRI~D GO.DVI2\
CH~lST~AlSfTH
ALFRED ~-I'tM.
JOSEPH ;OA1V.1, E,
C-JA L ILEYT
SO~l ASSES
t~ImF}SA AND ' ALT-

GI1

.L

The World's Greatest Comic Opera

* Lower Floor $1.50 and $1.00
Prrices.Balcony $1.00 and 75c -

Box Seats $2.00
Gallery 50

L S
BASIL LIORSFALL
CONI)UTOR

SEATS GO ON SALE FRIDAY MORNING AT 10 A.5M'

I

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