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November 14, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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S , d >HIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER, 14, 1915.

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PRICE FIVE CENTS

4

AFT GRAPHICALLY DESCRIBES BASIC
PRINCIPLE OF RECENTLY PROPOSED
LEAGElE NATIONS TO ENFORCE PEACE

X-PRESIUDET 4JLIS INTENSE
INTEREST OF 3 IEAR
INHIL A 1 RIIT'
AR NO DEAD ISSUE
°eace Con rence Vii Nieesrily
Follo End of (treat air,I
lie say~ a
ATWNS 1 FAIRLY
WAR Si-(O LD(A C E U S 1O
T ~oicsally aidc mwoiiicingly, lHon.
Vjliaoi ilowugd tiI presented the
vasic p iuplcs of League of Na
ton an audi-
e te of a , hill auditorium
cast right. 11rol the e that the ex-
lresideu roinrmenced is lecture, an
4tmosphvre if into ,c,'terest seemed
to settle on the hearer ad the ian-
ner in which ts im est was held
was proof of the vai for Mr. Taft's
material as well as or s personality
and ability as a pubis speaker
"A group of men, e of which was
myself," said Mr. Taf after beginning
his lecture, "onre li a dream that
war was a thing of t past, and that
nations were at lea on termns of
friendliness. The s "k that came to
us from the cataclyso that visited Eu-
rope was disceurage and humiliat-
ing to think of. 1-1 ever, we have
again taken hope and at a meeting at
the Century club in ew York, after
a great deai of diicv& ion, arrived at
a platform"
The groundwork df the platform, as
outlined by Mr. Ta, has been given
above.
Pence eonference A End of War
Afer giving his VPws on this mat-
ter, the fact that, ai the close of the
war, a peace c~omfdeklce between na-
tiojis would necessa-ily be held was
pointed out, and t-e probability of
America being iuvitpd to participate
was discussed. It' 0 l1'Aope of the
men interested in th armation of this
league that, if site an opportunity
arises, the platform, which has been
adopted, can be p ose*ted for consid-
eration. That this )roposed plan does
not tend to avoid var, but merely to
render it less pos lle, was clearly ex-
piakaed by m'. Ta{ That ihe prestige
of the United Sdta ts such, that her
interests are insuicientli great and
her power is sunflc jli formidable to
enable her to be a emmber at this fu-
ture peace confer ce, seems recog-
nized.
After briefly ouUining his subject,
Mr. Taft proceetudl to illustrate each
of is points J1r comparisons with
cases that would be readily understood
by all, viu, che& liablt" of arbitration
vwnicli is c xistec t between the United
Sate:s and G reat Pitaii ~as an example
o f t hl e a t o f d , °l i i n a c y a n d ni ron ,

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FOUR PLANKS OF PLATFORM *
OF PROPOSED PEACE LEAGUE *
1. All justiciable questions *
shall be submitted to an interna- *~
tional court for decision regard- *
ing their merits and jurisdiction. *
II. A Council of Conciliation *
shall provide for those cases *
which shall not be covered by *
section one. It shall hear the *
evidence and make recommenda- *
tions as to settlement of ques- *
tions.
III. If any member of the *
League begins war by hostile act *
against any other member, all *
the others must agree to use *
first economic methods to bring *
about an amicable settlement. *
However, if this fails, the other *
parties of the League shall go to *
war to defend the one prema- *
turely attacked.
IV. Congresses of the League *
shall consider questions of in- *
ternational law, enlarge upon *
them and act as a sort of inter- *
national legislature. *
*
* * * * * * * * * * * *

Y ZE j sE,,
1Ef ONSLAUGHTS
sW P M U FFRD
lDY F i3, SAe LONDON
DISPATCHES
EXPECT NEW ALLIED OFFENSE
lerli Admits Forces of Entente
Arc Niuerically
Superior
London, Nov. 13.-The Serbian main
army in the north is putting up a he-
roic resistance against the Austro-
Hungarian invaders. The main part of
the line based on the northern slope
to the south of the western Morava
river, and the smaller body of Ser-.
bians in the south, are reported to
have inflicted a severe check on the
Bulaiians at the Ketchanik Pass.
The Serbs are forcing the Bulgarians
back to Uskub.
lulgars Reported Repulsed
Reports from Saloniki and Athens,
under date of Thursday, represent the
Bulgarians as having met with a se-
vere defeat at this point. According
to these reports the Serbians have
cleared the enemy from the pass, and
the situation is developing in a strik-
ing way in favor of the Serbians.
(Continued on Page Six)
NICHOLSON OPENS
UNION SERVICES

TO WITNESS AlWARD
OF VARSITY M'S AT
FOOTBALLSMOKER
ALL-FRESH MENTOR DOUGLASSI
WILL SPEAK ON NEXT YEAR'S
PROSPECTS
ARRANGE'FOR ALUMNI SPEAKER'
Rand, Glee Club and Varsity Quartet
s)Provide Musical Features
of Program
With the strains of Michigan's band,
the harmony of the Varsity concert
quartet, the songs of the Glee club and
the unfailing cheers for a defeated
football team, the third annual Union
football smoker, to be held at Water-
man gymnasium on Tuesday night,
November 16, will go on record as4 an
exhibition of the spirit that still pre-
vails on the campus.
U to date the program committee has
been unable to secure a speaker for
the evening, but negotiations are being
made by Lee Joslyn, '17, with several
prominent Detroit alumni. The com-
plete program will probably be an-
nounced in a day or so. "Ed" Shields,
'94-'96L, notified the committee that he
will be unable to take part in the big
smoker.
One of the features of the smoker
will be a speech by Coach Douglass,
the All-Fresh mentor. Douglass will
discuss Michigan's chances for next
year, and will conclude his speech by
announcing those members of the All-
Fresh squad who are to receive their
numerals.
Francis F. McKinney, '16L, will pre-
side at the smoker, while Werner W.
Schroeder, '16L, will speak in behalf
of the student body. "Hal" Smith, '16,
Bronet. ~1 8, will )e on hand
to lead the cheers.
The ticket sale at the Union desk
indicates that the student body will
be well represented at the awarding
of the "M's." The price of admission,
as stated befor , is 5 cents, and tick-
ets will continue to be on sale at the
Union desk.
STREET CAR ENDS-
LIFE OF 1,.B, DRAPER

MICHIGAN AND PENNSYLVANIA BATTLE
TO SCORELESS TIE IN VARSITY'S LAST.
FOOTBALL GAME OF 1915 SCHEDULE

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*

* * * * * C* *
FOOTBALL SCORES

*

* Pennsylvania 0, Michigan 0.
" Yale 13, Princeton 7.
" Harvard 16, Br nn7.
* Syracuse 38, Colgate 0.
* New York University 0, Wesley-
* an 34.
* Cornell 40, Washington and Lee
* 21.
* Rutgers 28, All-Stars 7.
* Navy 28, Colby 14.
* Fordham 7, Rhode Island 0.
* Georgetown 28, South Carolina
* Aggies 0.
* Tuft 34, Bowdoin 0.
* Lafayette 3, Penn State 33.
* Dartmouth 27, Bates 0.
* Carlisle 20, Dickinson 14.
* Auburn 0, Vanderbilt 17.
* Lehigh 30, Lebanon Valley 9.
* *I * * * * * * * * * *

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*:
*x

VARSITY RETURNS FROM
PHILLY AT 4.00 O'CLOCK

INTERVIEW WITH TAFT ON
MILITARY TRAINING QUESTION
Wm. F. Newton
The views of ex-President William
Howard Taft on the installation of a
system of military tr.aining for under-
graduates in universities were given
last night in a personal interview.
When as'ed i r regard to the matter,
Mr. Taft said: "So far as preparation
goes, I hardly think that nilitary
training in colleges will prepare many
young collegians for offices in the
army. It does tend, though, toward
democracy in athletics-I hope you see
what I mean. In this way everyone
will receive physical training, where
now the interest is centered on a group
and the great mass is allowed to go
unnoticed. Obedience and subordina-
tion to law are taught, and in general
a better-groomed, better-mannered
young collegian will be produced,
and"-here Mr. Taft chuckled and con-
tinued, "I'm sure that's what we need
nowadays. President Hadley of Yale
has expressed himself in favor of this
system, as do a number of prominent
men in the east."
Although Mr. Taft's time was de-
cidedly limited, he seemed to take a
personal interest in affairs at Michi-
gan, and for the time being was cen-
tered in giving any opinion which
might be of interest to the campus.
BRITISH ADMIRALTY CHECKS
GERMAN SUBMARINE WARFARE
Fleets of Armed Motor Boats Used to
Chase Down U-Boats in the
North Sea
London, Nov. 13.-Full accounts
hae beer given out of the British tri-
uraph over, and practical elimination
of, the German submarine effective-
ness. Tle statement from Berlin that
submarIn warfare was stopped in or-,
dr' to please the United States is
laughed at here, the real reason being
given as the activity of the British
admi al:y.
Scores of mo~tOr boa s, inporte
every we 'k trOmh tne UnitlJed States,

Every Loyal Michigan Man and
man Expected to be at the
M. C. Station

Wo-

i

WAI
C'1101

* r.Tamn leaves Philadelphia 11:00
o'clock Saturday night.
* Arrives Ann Arbor 4:00 o'clock
* Sunday over the Michigan Cen-
* tral by special train.
* Band will be there!
* Everybody be there!
*
* * * * * * * * * * * *

Speak on "Life Symmetrical" iin
11111 Auditorium at 7:00
O'Clock Tonight
RUS OF 200 VOICES TO SING

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With an address on the subject,,
"The Life Symmetrical," Dr. Thomas
Nicholson, of New York City, will open
this year's series of monthly Union
services in Hill auditorium at 7:00
o'clock tonight.
The service, which will be entered
into by all of the Protestant commun-
ions of the city, will be under the su-
pervision of the Wesleyan Guild of the
Methodist church, and in addition to
the regular Methodist choir a chorus

University Hospital S
Meets Almost I;
Death
AN INQUEST WILL

Superinitenident
Ins taut

BE

HELI)

Thai in ecte
necessary for o
1 i la t.
v ing to los
good loser. If
w\ith a ehng
catio'nsr until o
atribeli.d to a
t. Of arbi .
va1eg on ll~
cuts gh.. . t;.
in ugds i
I . _, .~ . O i
tertP th !E

eee;ve Fair Play
Sarbit ration it wsas
of the parti(es cOl-
So give and receive
inght oe t orcefuly
am yu must be
aid \OU mu~st be a
go intlo arb'itratiOn
beads I wi, tails

J. B. Draper, for eight years super-
intendent of the University hospital,
met almost instant death yesterday
afternoon when struck by a street car
while crossing the tracks on North
University avenue near Barbour gym-
nasium. The accident occurred at 5:30
o'Wcock.
Superintendent Draper was return-
ing from the University hospital to his
home in South State street, when hit
by a northbound car packed to ca-
pacity. He was'dragged a distance of
40 or 50 feet before the power could
be shut off and he could be taken from
the tracks. Sustaining serious inter-
nal injuries, he was taken to the Ho-
meopathic hospital. He died half an
hour later without regaining con-
sciousness. According to a statement
by the Ann Arbor police last night,
the motorman, whose last name is Au-
gustus, was not held, pending an in-
quest.
Mr. Draper came to Ann Arbor in
1907 from the Pontiac asylum, where
he had served as steward for a num-
ber of years, to assume the duties of
superintendent in the University hos-
pital. He is survived by a wife and
daughter and a sister, Mrs. Perkins,
of Grand Rapids. He was 50 years old.

When the team arrives this after-t
noon from Philadelphia, every loyalt
Michigan man should be at the sta-
tion to meet the train and show that
he is back of every member of that
team. This applies to the Michigant
women as well as the men. It is an
opportunity to exhibit more of that fa-
mous Michigan spirit, and nothingt
should keep a single student from be-
ing at the depot.
The team left Philadelphia last night
at 11:00 o'clock on a special train, anda
will arrive in Ann Arbor at 4:00
o'clock this afternoon. That Michigan;
band will probably be on the sane
train, and if a crowd turns out to meet
the team there is no doubt but that
the musicians will uncork the "Vic-
tors" and do their share toward mak-
ing the occasion a notable one. "Hal"
Smith will be on hand to lead the
cheering, and every person present
will lbe expected to let loose with a
"Yea, team!" that can be heard all the
way from Ann Arbor to Franklin field.
Everybody be there! Let's go, Mich-
igan!
Tear Down Old Power House
The old power house is being torn
down. Workmen have been busy the
past few days removing machinery
from the station and it will probably
be several months before the work is
completed.
The university authorities plan to
move the highway laboratory from its
present location in the engineering
building into the remodeled power
house, and the building will also be
used as an automobile laboratory.
Re tn~ (t: 0m 4
o clok

QUAKERS THREATEN TO SCORE
THROUGHOUT WHOLE OF
FIRST QUARTER
SMITH PROVES STAR
Third Quarter Passes Without Mach
Progress Being Made on
Either Side
LONG RUN FEATURES FINISH
MILLER MAKES 60-YARD iTUN N
FINAL . FEW MOMENTS OF
PLA, BUT IS CALLED BACK
Franklin Field, Philadelphia, Pa.,
Nov. 13.-Michigan and Pennsylvania
battled to a scoreless tie here this
afternoon, neither team succeedng in
pushing the ball over the lie.
Pennsylvania tried three goals from
placement but they were all unsu-
cessful, and nary a count was regis-
tered in the 60 minutes of play. Both
aggregations threatened during the
afternoon, but at the psychological
moment either the defenders xallied
strongly, or else the team with the
ball faltered.
Penn Dangerous in First Quarter
Pennsylvania appeared particularly
dangerous during the first quarter of
play, but the visitors arose to the
occasion and the Quakers were
thwarted. Shortly after the game
opened the ball was worked back to
the Michigan 5-yard line, and "Morrie"
Dunne's punt was caught on the 40-
yard line, where Williams signaled for
a fair catch. Quarterback Dell tried
the first of the home team's three at-
tempts at field goals, but his iuten-
tions were some 100 per cent better
than his endeavors and Niemann cap-
tured the ball on the 30-yard line
Michigan punted, and when Penn-
sylvania punted back a few moments
later, Smith fumbled and Rockerfeller
fell on the ball on Michigan's 40-yard
line. Two penalties coupled with Vi-
liams excellent work in running with
the ball carried the oval up to the 15-
yard line. Two more plays put Penn-
sylvania within nine yards of the goal
but the Qvakers suffered a penalty at
this point. Hopkins recovered five
yards of this loss, and the locals 's-
sayed to forward pass. Roehm, the
Michigan quarterback, captured the
ball behind his own goal for a touch
back.
Smith Makes 35-Yard Gain
The second period opened with the
ball in Michigan's possession or her
own 35-yard line. Smith broke loose
and ran 35 yards before he was appre-
hended, Bell nailing him on the Penn-
sylvania 40-yard line A forward pass
to Niemann placed the ball on Penn-
sylvania's 18-yard line a minute later,
Two fake plays failed to gain and a
fake field goal cost Michigan eight
precious yards. Then Pat Smith threw
a forward pass but it was incompleted,
the ball going over to Penn. Bell
punted 80 yards and Roehm was down-
ed on his own 15-yard line after com-
ing back five yards The rest & the
half waged fairly even.
The third quarter passed without
either of the elevens making much
headway. Both teams were punting
frequently and the ball remained near
the center of the field When the third
period ended it was Pennsylvania'
ball on her own 33-yard line.
Rockerfeller made eight yards and
then crashed through the Michigan
line for first down. Derr added three
and then came right back with five
more. Miller was thrown for no gain,
and fell dropped back to the 23-yard

line for another attempt to kick a. field
oL his effort failed and it was
" s ball.

.4-'
U.4
'4
Y 4 4
tt

h

t as w et go st havn beei : na vihy a rmer and euo
u .
.i miahl leels, Runin' g at . , kno _ '
if tOre-Ign coid :'u, the have chasedl dV4wn n1m I' 1
c \ w1th t painl wa> 01s U-1)0 is WIre nets spread
exte.nt to 001' 5sy- endire area.i' of the >orlh -s.a 1iave aso
Thbe theory 01f enormnou' y reduced the nans>r s naval
boul not asume ower.
t. reutd b Dt. -- -- ri- -. ron
gr0diown hav n woE wObl., d)ISCOVEre htCI O
etods of pro gr ii 1>1 Fi exra(tion t'il t&
O'lc t > ugeiwzth
ghorow so I i:_.woman1'who disovered jhe tKIerati

DR, THOMAS NICHOLSON, of New
York City, who speaks tonight at
Hill auditorium in the first Union
lecture series.
"Ii foit-es under the direction of
Pro,. A. A. Stanley, of the school of
usi-, w ii render a special musical
Dr. 1 coIson is one of the best
aun W -sleyan clergymen in the
Uit d Sta es, and for the past several
_ inued on Page Six)

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
-UNION SE RVICE--
R} V. THOMAS NICHOLSON,, 0. 0.

--isrih.hi~c~ , "esa exchng of punts, Smith
Co'-mupoiitan ceu m<neetingh 4ri-an trew a long pass to Rehor, placing
lha'h, t c'c h ball in mid field. From then on tht
Union service, TiVmaL Ni(-1soilting was codiiined to the center of
sak--s, H1i11 auditorionm, 7:00 o'clock ' the gridiront dhe game ending with
ti- ball in Pennsylvania's possession
ntr-al League d bating squad meets, on Michigan's 40-yard line. The only
room 302, N. W., 4:00 and 7:00 distinctive feature during the final
o'clock. few vimets was a 60-yard .run by
J-Archbitects me-tig, room 3 E'ng. Mihla but he was called back for
buidding, 4:4At o'clock. sjin- outside.

of New York City, Secretary of the Board of Education
of the Methodist Episcopal Church
NIHT HILL AUDITORIUM -N
r ':.lock at 7 dec

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