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November 13, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-13

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THE DAILY
NEWS CF THEWORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

4

The

1 ig11

Daily

khones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

1

__ _

VOL. XXVI. No. 35.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

S

PRES. HUTCHINS
ENTERTAINS TFT
AT DINER TODAY
PEACE ABI)RESS 14 SCH E DULED I
TO STA R"V AT ,01 OCLOCK
LECTURER HELD BIG POSTIONS
Speaker Tonight is One of Most 1is-
tinguished Me to Visit Th'
City in Many Years
Ho. William Howard Taft, ex-pres-
ident of the United States, and pro-
fessor of law at Yale uniersity, will
arrive in Ann Arbor at 6:00 o'clock
this evening via the Michigan Central,
and will be cscorted directly to the
home o Presidet iharry B. Hutchins,
where the president will entertain at
dinner in his Honor. Shortly before
eight lie will proceed to Hill audito-
riumn, where at 8:00 o'clock he will
appear to make his address on "A
League of Nations to Enforce Peace."
President Hutchins will introduce him,
and President-Emeritus Angell in all
probability will sit on the platform.
Mr. Taft is the most distinguished
personage to visit Ann Arbor in many
years. Not since the early nineties,
when Mr. Cleveland spoke in Univer-
sity hall, has an Ann Arbor platform
been occupied by one who has filled
the presidential chair. Until his re-
tirement in 1913, Mr. Taft has held
public office continuously since he was
24 years old, when he became prose-
cuting attorney in Cincinnati. Since
then he has occupied the following po-
sitions: Internal revenue collector,
judge of the superior court in Cincin-
nati, judge of the United States circuit
court and of the United States court
of appeals, solicitor-general' of the
United States, president of the United
States Philippine commission, first
civil governor of the Philippines, pro-
visional governor of Cuba, secretary
of war, and president of the United
States. In the scholastic world he is
also distinguished and has received
degrees from Yale, Harvard, Pennsyl-
yania, Princeton, McGill, Miami, Iowa,
Wesleyan, and Cincinnati universities.
Mr. Taft has been greeted by mam-
moth audiences wherever he has ap-
peared. The people seem to recognize
in him one who has preserved his dig-
nity and equanimity in the face of po-
litical defeat, and he is today prob-
ably one of the most highly and uni-
versally respected citizens of the na-
tion.
S ELECT CAST FOR
COMEDY CLUB PLAY
Morrison Wood, '17, and Phyllis Povah,
'16, Will Play Leading Roles in
This Year's Production
REHEARSALS START DIRECTLY
Morrison C. Wopd, '17, as "Professor
Goodwillie," and Phyllis Povah, '16,
as "Lucy White," will play the prin-
cipal roles in this year's Comedy club
production, "The * Professor's Love
Story," written by J. M. Barrie.
Completion of the keen contest for
parts resulted yesterday in the selec-

tion of the following cast, besides the
two above named:
Mary L. Johns, '16, "Effie Proctor";
Inez M. Gose, '17, "Agnes Goodwillie";
Leon Cunningham, '16, "Dr. Cozens";
Clay W. Wilber, '16L, "Dr. Yellowlees";
H. H. Springstun, '17, "Sir George
Gilding"; Henryetta Brandebury, '18,
"Lady Gilding"; Pauline Emerson, '16,
"The Dowager Lady Gilding"; Arthur
(Continued on Page Six)

Ta8-ft At 11111Auditorium Tonk lht

C HURCHILL QUITS
POST IN CABINET
OFGREAT BRITAIN'

I

BLAi~:) FOR i-FAILURE
( AMP'AIGN AGAINST
DIRDINELLE S

OF THE
THE

"JJ,
"J:":I
f...., "..'"."'
"ry " ...J"";: " :t-j:
t

NAMES HEADS FOR
UNION FUNCTIONS
President Gault Urges Men to Take
More Interest in Union Com-
mittee Jobs
HOLD MEMBERSHIP DINNER SOON
President Harry G. Gault, '17, of the
Michigan Union, officially announced
yesterday the names of the men who
are to supervise the different Union
functions that will take place during
the year. He also urged that the stu-
dents, in general take more interest in
the Union and come out for the vari-
ous committee jobs. "As a rule," he
says, "the non-fraternity men have
given the least assistance in Union
matters."
A. S. Hart,.'17, was chosen as chair-
man of the musical programs for Sur-
day afternoons for the first semeste:%.
The first of these programs is sched-
uled to be held on November 21.
Russell S. Collins, '16, will have
charge of the faculty nights, the first
of which will be held on November 23.
Harry D. Parker, '16, will have
charge of the first Forum, to be held
on Wednesday night, November 17.
Last year the Forum meetings were a
distinct success and opened a way for
the expressions and opinions of all
classes of men on the campus.
A. M. Bentley, '16, was chosen as
head of the finance committee. The
men under him are to be announced
next week. Wallace Reed, '16, will be
chairman of the program committee.
The first membership dinner will be
held on December 1.
The office hours for the various men
at the Union are as follows:
Harry Gault, every day, 4:00 to 5:00
o'clock; Saturday, 11:00 to 12:00
o'clock.
James B. Angell II, lit vice-president,
Monday, 5:00 to 6:00 o'clock, and
Wednesday, 4:00 to 5:00 o'clock.
Francis E. Mack, Thursday, 4:00 to
6:00 o'clock.
Werner Schroeder, law vice-presi-
dent, Friday, 4:00 to 6:00 o'clock.
William J. Egan, medic vice-president,
Tuesday, 5:00 to 6:00 o'clock.
Edwin W. Crysler, combined col-
leges, Wednesday, 5:00 to 6:00 o'clock.
John W. Finkenstaedt, recording sec-
retary, Tuesday, 4:00 to 5:00 o'clock,
and Saturday, 10:00 to 11:00 o'clock.

UNION COMMITTEES
'TO MEET ON NO.20

(,'uer I ) i.~ciis i ?6' e
AUL ll"EMBERS OB R~

in

ST

"What has been done and how the
rest of the Michigan Union building
campaign will be pushed," will be dis-
cussed at a meeting of the general
campaign, advisory campaign, and
building committees to be held on Sat-
urday, November 24. Notices of the
general meeting have already been
sent out and all the respective meni-
bers in and out of the city are expect-
ed to be in Ann Arbor at the appointed
time to discuss the campaign work.
President Harry B. Hutchins will also
take part in the discussion.
The members of the various com-
mittees who will take part in the meet-
ing are as follows:
General Campaign Committee--
Henry M. Bates, chairman; Henry E.
Bodman, Detroit; harry C. Bulkley,
Detroit; Benjamin S. Hanchett, Grand
Rapids; Evans Holbrook, George W.
Millen, Dr. Reuben Peterson, Shirley
W. Smith, Gardher S. Williams, Homer
L. Heath, secretary; Chas. A. Hughes,
publicity manager.
Alumni Advisory Cemwittec-- -Law-
rence Maxwell, a'74, flon. '93, '04,
chairman, Cincinnati, Ohio; Earl D.
Babst, a93, l'94, Hon. '11, New York
City, N. Y.; Eugene J. Carpenter,
a'84-'87, 1'87-'88, Minneapolis, Minn.;
Roy D. Chapi, a'98-'01, l'00-'01, De-
troit, Mich.; Delbert J. Haff, a'84, l'86,
Hon. '09, Kansas City, Mo.; Richard
C. Peters, a'82-'84, Omaha, Nebraska;
Charles B. Warren, a'91, Detroit,
Mich., and John M. Zane, a'84, Hon.
'14, Chicago, Ill..

1700 SERBS TAKEN PRISONERS
ilritish Steamship Rhineland Sunk by
(lernan Submarine; Only
One Survivor
London, Nov. 12.-Winston Spencer
Churchill, formerly first lord of the ad-
miralty and more recently chancellor
of Lancaster, has resigned from the
cabinet, according to an official an-
noncement received tonight.
This action was not entirely unex-
ueted, as Mr. Churchill has been the
:abject of much adverse criticism.
Upon him was placed the blame for
the navy's lack of action at the open-
ing of the war, and he was deposed
when the new ministry was formed.
The British public also held him re-
sponsible for the disastrous attempt
by the fleet, unsupported by troops, to
force the Dardanelles. Although his
position as chancellor of Lancaster
was practically a nominal one, the ex-
head of the admiralty felt the weight
of public opinion and thought best to
sever all connection with the present
government.
Winston Churchill announced today
that he will go to the front.
Berlin (via Sayville wireless), Nov.
12.--The Serbian main army is return-
ing through the valleys and mountain
defiles south of the western Morova.
Bulgarians and Austro-Germans
along the Orient railroad are pursuing
at the best speed the broken country
(Continued on Page Six)
PROFESSOR STRAUSS NEW HEAD
President Hutchins Appoints Him to
Chairmanship of Committee
ou Student Affairs
Prof. L. A. Strauss, of the English
department, has been appointed to the
chairmanship of the committee on
Ltudent affairs by President Harry B.
Hutchins, to fill the vacancy caused
by the resignation of Dean Alfred H.
Lloyd. This position will carry with
it an ,ex-ofiicio membership in the
Senate Council, if the motion passed
by the University Senate to that ef-
fect is approved by the Board of Re-
gents at its next meeting.
Prof. Strauss' office hours will be
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thurs-
days from 10:00 o'clock to 11:00
o'clock in room 8, University hall.
SENATE OF HAYTI RATIFIES
PENDING TREATY WITH U. S.
Washington, Nov. 12.-The state de-
partment was advised today of the rat-
ification by the Haytien senate of the
pending treaty between the United
States and Hayti, which gives the
Washington government a large meas-
ure of control over Haytien affairs,
particularly the national finances. The
treaty will be submitted to the United
States senate.

Again= Who Hath
Least Giveth Most
If every alumnus and student were
as loyal in his support of Michigan's
campaign for a new Union club house
jas the writer of this letter to the Mich-
igan Union canvassing headquarters,
then try to figure out how easily a
$1,000,000 building could be put up!
The letter reads like this:
Michigan Union Canvassing Headquar-
ters:
Please pardon my delay in answer-
ing your letters. Have been very busy
lately and also have delayed to find a
way to help out the fund.
Frankly, though, am afraid I can't
help at all, just now, and very little
in the future. You see, it was like
this: Early in 1911 I had to give up
my job on account of my health. After
about six weeks my doctor told me I
had tuberculosis, and about April of
that year I came to . After
taking the "cure" here about a year,
I went to , leaving my wife,
who also had tuberculsis. I did not
make good in as expected, so
returned again in six months. On my
return, I received Work in.a laboratory'
as assistant. My salary from the lab-
oratory is about $30 per month, but I
also pick up from $20 to $30 a month
on routine laboratory examination, and
when not otherwise engaged try to bol-
ster up my income by taking magazine
orders. Now I could get along on my
income nicely if it wasn't for two
things-that is, my wife's illness and
my debts contracted during my own
illness. These two items keep me al-
ways "broke." On November 1 we
moved to smaller quarters and hope to
thus be able to pay more on our debts;
but when I tell you that I owe about
$500 on running expenses, you can see
how deep I'm in. Have mentioned all,
this so that you may know why I can-
not help any this year. I'm going to,
sign up the white card for no pay-
ments this year; June 1, 1916, $3.00;
December 1, 1916, $.00, and June 1,
1917, $4.00. If by any possible chance
I can increase this amount, I'll do so,
but I dare not promise more at this;
time.
I most heartily approve of the,
"Union" building and feel honored to
be asked to help out in the scheme,
as I only attended the U. of M. one
year. Sure wish I could fill out the;
green card.
Here's wishing you all kinds of suc-
cess in the work.
Yours in Michigan,
D. B. NEWTON, '17D, ANNOUNCES
HIS MARRIAGE TO MISS MILLER
Keeping his closest friends in
darkness, even unto his room-mate,
last evening at dinner Daniel B. New-
ton, '17D, announced his marriage to
Miss Elizabeth Miller, of Oil City, Pa.
The ceremony took place August 15,
and the announcement at this time
came somewhat in the nature of a sur-
prise. It is rumored that Mrs. Newton
will come to Ann Arbor at the begin-
ning of the second semester, at which
time the couple will go to housekeep-
ing.
Mr. Newton is a member of Acacia
and Psi Omega fraternities.
WHAT'S GOING ON__
TODAY
Emma Goldman speaks, Modern Wood-
men hall, 3:00 and 8:00 o'clock.
William Howard Taft, Hill auditorium,
8:00 o'clock.
Michigan Union dance, Union, 9:00

o'clock.
TOMORROW
Church of Christ (Disciples), "The
Heresies of Jesus," 10:30 o'clock.
Unitarian church, "The Larger Faith
of TobIay," 10:30 o'clock.
Cosmopolitan club meeting, Unitarian
church, 3:30 o'clock.
Union service, Thomas Nicholson

Sailors of
Hand
* * * *
*
* TO
* MichIga
* Dunne....
* Watson ...
* Weske...
* Niemann.
* Cochran
* Norton...
* Staatz...
* Roehm...
* Maulhets(
* Catlett...
* Smith....

MICHIGAN MEETS
PENNSY IN FIN9l
CASH OF SEASG
BOTH QUAKER AND WOLVERI
SQUADS PREPARE.D-FOR
CONFLICT
PENNSY BACKFIELD IS Putt

S * * *

* *" * *:'

Philadelphia, Nov 12.-Pennsylvania
and Michigan, two of the big football
teams in the country that have suf-
fered a rather checkered career this
season, stand Jeady for tomorrow's
game.
Both the visitors and the home team
have met reverses frequently of late,
but tomorrow's contest will see one
or the other of them push into the
winner's column, unless the game re-
sults in a tie.
The Pennsylvania line-up is an un-
settled proposition, and the chances
are that Captain Harris may not be
in the game when the battle begins.
If Harris is on the side lines, Urqu-
art will replace him in all probabili-
ties, with left end Hopkins acting as
captain. Harris has been playing er-
ratic football of late, starring one min-.
ute and then showing, a complete re
versal the next, so that the coaches
are undecided as to whether he should
begin -tomorrow's contest at his old
position at tackle.
The Pennsylvania backfield is an-
other problem that has puzzled thy
local coaches. It looks as though
Bell, Derr, Rockerfeller and Miller
will start, although Ross is a possi-
bility for left half. He will probably
get into the game in all events, even
if Derr starts. Miller will undoubted-
ly begin at fullback, although he may
be shifted to end with Williams in the
first mentioned position.
The Michigan line-up seems fairly
certain, leftI guard being the only
problem confronting Coach Yost.
Weske, who recently graduated from
the scrubs, seems like the logical
choice, but both Reimann and Millard
loom up as possibilities.
The Michigan team. will be accord-
ed plenty of support in the contest to-
morrow, as in addition to the regular
student rooters and alumni, the sail-
-ors of the battleship Michigan will be
on hand. Then, too, there is the fa-
mous Michigan band, which comes
with a reputation that extends through
eastern collegiate circles.
Maulbetsch and Catlett were the
two principal ground gainers in last
year's game, and -the Pennsylvania
team has been coached to stop this
pair. Tomorrow's game will be the
wind-up of the season for the Wol-
verines and every effort will be made
to capture the contest.

a

Battleship
to Support
and Blue
* * * *

michiga
maize

DA
in
(C)
ch.

X'S LINE-UP
Pennsylvania
L. E.. . Hopkins
L. T.....Russell
L. G. ....Henning
. C.....Wray
R. G. ....Dorizas
. R. T. . Harris (C)
R. E, .....Hawley
Q. B. .. ..... .. .Bell
L. H........Derr
R.H. .Rockerfeller
F. B. . .Miller

*
*
*

1 m

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION STS.

Mary

Antin

Sunday Morning at

10:3 0

*
*
*
*
*

* * * * .* * * * * * *
Ad W. Riter says:-
Circular rising is good.
Back it up with ' identifying
advertising.
* * * * * * * - * * *

*-
*
*

University Bible Glasses at Noon

*

speaks, Hill auditorium, 7:00 o'clock. 1*

.t

E

A

UOL D

THE NOTED ANARCHIST

Will Lecture This Afternoon and Evening at Modern Woodman Hall, Cor. Main & Washington

AFTERNOON, 3 O'CLOCK
Nietische THE INTELLECTUAL STORM CENTRE OF EUROPE

Admission, 25 Cents
N~ddSM@MM~ygg

EVENINC, 8 O'CLOCK
Birth Control (Why and How Small Families Are

p:

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