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November 12, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-12

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THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD ANDI
THE CAMPL S

The

MVi c a

Daily

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEG~RAPH SERVICE BY THEI
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 34.

____

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

_. i

EDWARD MACK TO
LAD JUNIORS AT
ANNUAL FUNCTION
JOSLYN, NMEMANN, CARLSON ANDl
PALMER CHOSEN TO ASSIST
GENERAL CHAIRMAN
OTHER CLASSES SELECT MEN
Arnold, Honey and Mandeville Are to
Represent Medics, Dents rnd
Homeops
Edward E. Mack, '17, was elected
general chairman of the J-Hop com-
mittee for this year by the junior lit-
erary class yesterday afternoon. Be-
sides the chairman, the class chose
Lee Joslyn, W. K. Niemann, Harry
Carlson and Edwin Palmer as its rep-
resentatives on the committee. i
Junior classes in three other depart-
ments also elected one committee
member each as follows: Medics, A.
L. Arnold; dents, A. D. Honey, and
homeops, C. B. Mandeville. The junior
pharmics will choose one representa-
tive on the com'mittee today, the junior
laws will elect their two members
Wednesday, and the third-year engi-
neers will name their representation
of four next Thursday. As soon as
the university senate has acted finally
on the hop petition, the work of pre-
paring for the big mid-year prom will
* begin, provided the senate's action is
favorable.
That a junior lit smoker will be held
at the Union on Monday evening,
November 22, was also decided upon
at their meet ing yesterday. The social
committee plans to introduce at this
event some pleasing variations from
the ordinary affair of the kind. In ad-
dition to this, the class voted to have
a dance at the Union Friday, Decem-
ber 17.
A tax of 50 cents for this semester
on each member of the class was as-
sessed, general payment to be made on
December 9 Those who have not yet
paid the dues of last year will owe
$1.00 at that time. Notice was given
by the treasurer of the new student
council rule that an increase of 50 per
cent will be collected hereafter for all
dues not settled during the year they
are assessed.
FOUR WAR MUNITION PLANTS
BURN INSIDE OF 24 HOURS
New York, Nov. 11.-Four big fires
within 24 hours in factories making
war supplies for the allies demanded
the attention of federal authorities to-
day. Following a million dollar blaze
at the Bethlehem Steel works, fire
swept two buildings- of the Midzale-
Pennsylvania Steel Ordinance com-
pany in which were stored patterns
for the manufacture of 3,000,000 rifles
for the British government.
Early today fire destroyed the rope
plant of John Roebling's Sons' com-
pany, Trenton, causing damage of
$1,000,000. Roebling's Sons was mak-
ing barbed wire for the allies. There
was also a $50,000 fire in the pattern
shops of the Baldwin Locomotive
works, Aggyscone, Pa., and a blaze
which caused $30,000 damage to the
American Synthetic Boiler company of

Stanford, Conn. The Baldwin works
was under contract to make locomo-
tives for the Russian government.
SOCCER FOOTBALL TAKEN UP
BY COSMOPOLITAN STUDENTS
Cosmopolitan club is organizing an
international soccer football team,
and the first practice was held Wed-
nesday. Intramural Director Rowe
has consented to permit the team to
practice on Ferry Field under the
lights, from 7:15 to 8:00 o'clock every
evening during the week, and to use
the old clubhouse
The club is making no effort to work
against the Varsity, and Rowe has
given the team his approval. When
bad weather sets in, practice will be
continued in the gymnasium. Contests
will probably be arranged with sev-
eral of the amateur teams in Ann Ar-
bor and Detroit.

Ann A rboris Kind
To Private Le Roux
Reaches City Fresh From French
Trenches; Destitute; Leaves
Happy
Ann Arbor proved to be the turning
point in the affairs of Private LeRoux.
recently dismissed with honor from
the French army. He came here with-
out money, and left with a ticket for
Kankakee, Illinois.
When he left the military hospital
in Cherbourg, France, he carried in his
pocket what he considered sufficient
money to take him to his home. All
the way across the ocean he rejoiced
over his return, even though maimed
for life. It was not until he reached
Montreal that a cloud began to settle
over him. In that Canadian city he
discovered that his finances were at
a low ebb, and that he would be desti-
tute long before he reached the French
settlement which has grown up around
Kankakee. He made the most of his
predicament, and bought a ticket to
Detroit, where he spent his last cent
for food.
At this point he remembered of
hearing of Prof. Moritz Levi while in
the trenches near Lille, and begged
enough money on the street to bring
him to Ann Arbor. On Monday after-
noon he limped into the office of the
French department and asked for the
professor. He was absent, but Prof.
Hugo P. Thieme listened to the story
told him in the tongue of a French
peasant.
Until March, LeRoux had been in
the advance lines, fighting "for civil-
ization," with the din of heavy artil-
lery so loud in his ears that he be-
came temporarily deaf. In a charge,
he had his hip injured, his head wound-
ed, and three ribs and his arm broken.
In the hospital at Cherbourg they told
him that he was to receive a pension,
of 300 francs. This he turned over to
his mother who was living in France.
"There was no use trying to get
work there," he said. "The Belgian
refugees are doing all the labor. Of
course, the women are doing the
greater share of it. I had to come to
America."
Through the efforts of Professor
Thieme, a ticket was purchased for
LeRoux, and with many protestations
of thanks, he boarded a train and
began the last stage of his journey to
the family which has been anxiously
awaiting news of him.
PRESIDENT TO CONFER WITH
REPUBLICANS ABOUT DEFENSE
Washington, Nov. 11.-White House
officials announced today that Presi-
dent Wilson will invite the Republican
leaders to confer with him on the ad-
ministration of national defense.
The announcement indicates the
president's intention to seek Republi-
can support to fill the gap to be made
by the anticipated falling off in the
Democratic support. It probably
means that the president will not at-
tempt to hold a Democratic caucus for
the support of Democratic measures.
"HAL" SMITH WILL GO ALONE
TO LEAD CHEERS AT PENNSY
Due to the fact that not enough
money has obtained to send two cheer
leaders, the student council has de-
cided to send only "Hal" Smith, '16.
On first consideration, they had1
planned to send two, each paying the

amount lacking. Instead, the surplus
money, amounting to approximately
$30, has been placed in a bank, where
it will be held as a "cheer leader"'
fund to aid in sending men to the east-
ern games in future years.
SENIOR ENGINEERS TO GIVE
TURKEY DAY DANCE AT UNION
Senior engineers will hold a
"Thanksgiving Dance" at thehMichi-
gan Union Wednesday, November 24.
This will be the engineer's first dance
of the year and special pains will be
taken to make it a success. It is
promised that several original "stunts"
will feature the program.
The social committee, headed byI
Harley Warner, '16E, announces that
the dance will continue from 9:00 to
1:00 o'clock. Tickets will be $1.00.
Fischer's orchestra will perform as,
usual.I

THINK ASSEMBLIES Eat,lj;rinkande
WILL RING NITY 'Ierry, says Union
Stagtawvay Orders Thousand
__ _._of Drinking Cups, Doughnuts,
Dr. Scott Believes Meetings Are to Etc., for Smoker
Solve Question of Uniting
-1--- Souvenir drinkhng ru es with the

Y reshmien

FIRST GATHERING ON MONIAY
"The problem of class unity will
be solved, I believe, by the freshman
literary assembly," said Dr. J. F. Scott,
chairman of the arrangements commit-
tee for the affair, in outlining the pur-
pose of the monthly gatherings yes-
terday.
"It is our purpose to give to the
first year men as many of the things
they can not get in the class room as
possible. The university is so big that
it is impossible for the faculty.to meet
each freshman individually, so we have
arranged a program of speeches by
-prominent members of the faculty and
interested outsiders. This, we hope,
will bring about a greater community
of interest between the different inem-
hers of the first year class, the faculty
and the university in general.
"The first real test of the assembly
plan in the literary college will be
given at 4:00 o'clock Monday, when
Dean J. R. Effinger will talk to the
freshmen on 'College Manners and
Mannerisms' in the auditorium of the
new science building. Every freshman
in the literary college is urgently re-
quested to attend, for it is the suc-
cess that the first meetings receive that
will determine whether the plan will
or will not be a failure. Last year,
in the spring, two assemblies for the
freshmen were held. President Hutch-
ins and Prof. R. M. Wenley spoke, but
the meetings were not on as large a
scale as the present program calls
for."
Possibly, there will be time allotted
at the assemblies for class meetings,
according to the committee in charge
of the affairs, but there has been
nothing definite decided upon in this
matter.
Y1M0CA PLNSBENEFIT
FOR EUROPEAN WORIERS
Hill Auditorium Gathering Conceived
to Help "Y" Work Among
Soldiers
At a meeting of the Y. M. C. A. cab-
inet held last night in Newberry hall,
plans were discussed for holding a
large Hill auditorium meeting some
time next month for the benefit of the
"Y" work among the soldiers in the
trenches of Europe.
An effort is being made to secure
John R. Mott, who has but recently
returned from the war-ridden coun-
tries, to tell of conditions as he found
them, and negotiations have been
opened toward securing Henry Ford,
millionaire Detroit automobile manu-
facturer, to act as chairman of the
meeting.
Plans were also made for the ob
servance by the local organization of
the week of prayer, which is an annual
event with all the associations of the
country, and which is to be held this
year next week.
The appointment of Rudolph F.
Wuensch, '17, as chairman of the pub-
licity committee was also confirmed.
Krupp Works Make Big War Profit
Berlin, Nov. 11.-The gross earnings
of the Krupp works according to its
annual report, are more than double
what they were the previous year.
This year the gross earnings amounted
to 113,000,000 marks against 54,000,000
marks for a year ago. The net earn-
ings have also increased from 33,900,-

000 marks to 86,400,000 marks. This
increase is laid directly to the war.
Tourists Ruining Service's Cabin
Seattle, Wash., Nov. 11.-While Rob-
ert W. Service, a distinguished writer,
was playing with death in the trenches
of Flanders, the tourists who visit his
home or cabin, all take with them
portions of the building as souvenirs,
so that the home is practically gone.
The people who love Service and his
cabin resent the acts of the tourists
to a very marked degree.

team's picture on them, Bull Durham
tobacco and a reliable corncob pipe, a
package of Omar cigarettes and lots
of doughnuts and cider for 25 cents,
will be the extent ot liberality at the
third annual Union football smoker to
be held at Waterman gymnasium on
'Puesday.night.
With a host of good speakers and the
refreshment program just mentioned,
the Michigan Union plans to exceed
any like smoker that has ever been
given in Ann Arbor.
Werner Schroeder, '16L, will speak
for the students, while it is expected
that "Ed" Shields, .'94-'96L, will be
able to make arrangements and come
and speak for the alumni.
Tickets for the smoker have been
on sale at the Union desk for Union
members for two days and it is re-
ported that a large number of them
have been sold. The sale will continue
for Union members today only, while
the general sale will begin tomorrow
morning.
EXPECT BIG CROWD
AT TAFT LECTURE
Large Sale of Tickets Leads Promoters
to Predict Record-Break-
ing Audience
APPROPR ATE TME FOR TALK
'T'ickets for the Taft lecture are sell-
ing exceptionally well, and those in
charge of the affair expect a record-
breaking crowd to be present Satur-
day night to hear the ex-president
speak on "A League of Nations to En-
force P 'ace."
Because of the present agitation on
the campus, and throughout the uni-
versities of the United States, this lec-
ture 'seems to come at an appropriate
time. William Howard Taft, while in
office at Washington, both as president
and secretary of war, is said by his
supporters to have done much to bring
on an amicable understanding be-
tween the great powers, and while he
is not an extremist on either the mat-
ter of "Preparedness," or "Peace at
Any Price," he will endeavor to sug-
gest ideas of a sane nature which, if
put into practice, might reduce the
possibilities of war.
At the request of Prof. R. D. T.
Hollister, students who have been en-
gaged in selling tickets for this lec-
ture, will either report at Wahr's
book store from 1:00 to 2:00 o'clock
tomorrow afternoon, or call up Pro-
fessor Hollister, who has direct
charge of the selling of tickets.
CONSCRIPTION FOR ENGLAND?
Lord Derby Declares Step Will Prob-
ably be Taken by December 1
London, Nov. 11.-Conscription will
probably be resorted to in Great Brit-
ain by December 1, unless all young
men medically fit and not indis-
pensible to any business of national
importance, enlist before November 30.
Lord Derby, director of recruiting,
made this declaration tonight with the
authority of Premier Asquith.
WEALTHY VIRGINIA MAN KILLS
SELF AND WIFE IN NEW YORK.
New York, Nov. 11.-Henry C. Rup-

pert, of a wealthy family in Richmond,
in their rooms in the Hotel McAlpine.
Va., killed his wife and himself today
Their bodies, each with a bullet wound
in the temple, were found by hotel
employes.
They had stopped here while enr
route to California on a trip for Mrs.
Ruppert's health. No cause for Rup-
pert's action can be ascertained. Mrs.
Ruppert was his second wife. The
first on, divorced him. He was 35
years of age, she (his second wife)
was 30.

FIGURES SHNOW FACULTY
TO BE ASSISTING UNION
Reports Come in Slowly, But General
Outlook Appears to Be
Encouraging
Reports of the faculty Union can-
vassing committees were reported yes-
terday as coming in slowly, but with
all indications that the canvass will
be a thorough one. Although no un-
usual amount of extra contributions
have been made, t: constant increase
in life memberships indicates that the
faculty is wiliing to assist in the
building project.
The only conclusion to be reached
from the figures of Prof. H. E. Riggs,
chairman of the various departmental
committees, is that the economics de-
partment leads in the number of life
memberships. The law department
holds second place with an average
of 55 per cent of the faculty enlisted
with the Union life members.
The local campaign, under the su-
pervision of Ray Ballentine, '16, plans
to make another canvass beginning
with next week, at which time the var-
ious committees appointed will make
a thorough round-up of the campaign
begun about a week ago.
ANNOUNCE CAST OF COMEDY
CLUB PRODUCTION TOMORROW
Try-outs for the cast of "The Pro-
fessor's Love Story," this year's prin-
cipal production of the Comedy club,
were completed last night in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. The names of
the players will be given out tomor-
row after the eligibility of those on
the list has been verified.
Zeppelin Makes Eight-Hour Flight
Berlin, Nov. 11.--One of the huge
German Zeppelin dirigible balloons
made a continuous eight-hour flight
from Belgrade, Austria, to Sofia, Bul-
garia. This Zeppelin had the Duke of
Mecklenburg on board.
After King Ferdinand, ministers and
nearly all of Sofia had visited the air-
ship, it started on its return voyage.
C-C-C MEN START 1RCE
FROM FIELDTOMORROW
Runners to Appear Between Halves of
All-Fresh-University of
Detroit Game
Michigan's football rooters will be
given a chance to see the most prom-
ising cross country squad the univer-
sity has ever had start on its trial race
tomorrow afternoon. The runners are
to make the start from Ferry Field
between the halves of the freshman
game with the University of Detroit.
Every man who has been running
with the squad this year is expected
to be on deck at 2:00 o'clock tomor-
row, so that the entire entry list for
the trials may be at the scratch when
the gun is blown during the football-
ers' period of rest.
The race will be a handicap event,
so that those who -have not been run-
ning at the head of the pack in the
preliminary work may not be kept
from competing in this event. The
scratch men compose the candidates
for the eastern intercollegiate, and
from their number the selection of
six men will be made, these men to
represent the Wolverinesinsthe east-
ern classic at Franklin, Mass.

WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
Senior lit class meeting, Tappan hall,
3:00 o'clock.
J-pharmics' meeting, 300 chemical
building, 3:00 o'clock.
Kentucky club meeting, Michigan
Union, 5:00 o'clock.
Buffalo men's smoker, Michigan Union,
7:00 o'clock.
Webster society meets, Webster hall,
7:30 o'clock.
Jeffersonian society meets, Jefferson-
ian hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Hobart Guild party, Harris hall, 8:30
o'clock.
TOMORROW
Emma Goldman speaks, Woodmen hall,
3:00 and 8:00 o'clock.
William Howard Taft, Hill auditorium,
8:00 o'clock.

DEATHSONANCONA
REPORTED AS 105
IN NAPLS ADVICE
AMERICANS IN DISASTER ESTI.
MATED AT BETWEEN 20
AND 27
CUNARD LINER IS TORPEDOED
"Cairo" Victim of German Submarine;
Scene of the Disaster Not
Known
London, Nov. 11.-Late advices from
Naples tonight indicated that the loss
of life on the Italian liner "Ancona,"
torpedoed and sunk by an Austrian
submarine Tuesday evening, does not
amount to more than 105 persons.
The exact number of Americans in-
cluded in the "Ancona" disaster and
the number of those who perished have
not yet been established. Strenuous
efforts to obtain a complete list of the
deaths are being made by the Amer-
ican embassy in Rome.
Estimates place the number at be-
tween 20 and 27 Americans on board.
A Naples dispatch late tonight asserts
that 347 out of a total of 496 passen-
gers and members of the crew have
been safely landed thus far, and more
boats are expected to reach port safe
ly. A Rome dispatch says the names
and the fate of 24 American passengers
are unknown.
British Ship "Cairo" Goes Down
London, Nov. 11.-The British steam-
ship "Cairo" was sunk by a German
submarine today. Where the disaster
happened is not known. The crew was
saved. The "Cairo" was a Cunarder
of 3,032 tons displacement. She sailed
from Liverpool October 7 for Naples.
French Blow Up German Trenches
Paris, Nov. 11.-Destruction of Ger-
man trenches in Garonne by an explo-
sion of mines, and occupation of the
excavation despite serious resistance,
is described in the official war report
tonight. The German base in front of
Beauzraignes also was blown up.
Entente Starts Galiopol Evacuation
Berlin (via Amsterdam), Nov. 11.-
The long-expected evacuation of the
Galliopoli peninsula by the entente has
begun, according to press reports here.
The statements are made that from
authoritative sources it has been
learned that Anglo-French officials
have decided that further attempts at
the Dardanelles will for the present
at least be futile.
The tenth British regiment, the first
and second French regiments and all
infantry troops were removed today.
Other removals are expected to follow
at regular intervals.
Greek-Serb Neutral Zone Provided
London, Nov. 11.-Arrangements
have been concluded between the Gre-
cian government and the Sofia admin-
istration whereby a neutral zone has
been provided for along the border be-
tween Greece and Serbia. The zone is
to prevent unnecessary warlike impli-
cations between Bulgar and Greek if
the invaders of Serbia should approach
near the border of Greece.
A French scouting party of cavalry
has frightened out the Bulgar garrison
at Veles; who thought the French were
the vanguard of larger forces. After

firing a munitions depot of the Bul-
garians, the French retired from the
vicinity.
British Destroyer is Wrecked
London, Nov. 11.-The British tor-
pedo boat destroyer Louis has been
wrecked in the eastern Mediterranean.
No lives were lost.
Vegetable Consignment Goes to France
Rochester, N. Y., Nov. 11.-More
than 50,000,000 pounds of vegetables
have been purchased in this section
by a Belleville, Ontario, corporation
to be shipped to France to feed sol-
diers in the trenches.

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