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November 11, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

;:

A

I Mary Antin Returns

Business

Communications

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MAY ANTIN WILL
RETURN TO SPAK
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH SECURES
NOTED LECTURER TO ADDRESS
CONGREGATION SUNDAY
IMMIGRATION HER SUBJECT
Mary Antin, who spoke in University
hall October 28, will return to Ann
Arbor next Sunday, to occupy the pul-
pit of the Presbyterian church. Mary
Antin is know throughout the coun-
try from her books and talks on the
immigrant, and it is on some phase
of the immigration problem that she
will speak. Whatever the aspect of
the question she chooses to dwell on,
it is always the larger question of
the. American ideal on which she lays
emphasis.
Her own life history as told in her
first book, "The Promised Land," has
fitted her to speak with authority on
the immigration problem. She came.
to America from Russia when yet a
small child. Her complete identifi-
cation with American problems serves
as a model for that ideal of citizen-
ship for which she is working.
The tour which she is now making
has taken her to all parts of the
country and everywhere she has met
with enthusiastic welcome. At Sag-
inaw Mary Antin spoke before the
Michigan State Teachers' association,
appearing on the same program with
Ex-President Taft, who is alsoto
speak in Ann Arbor the night pre-
ceeding her appearance.
wws
BUSINESS TOPICS "
qI IL Hill
PROSPERITY WILL FOLLOW WAR
Bankers Predict Commercial Activity
Will Follow Peace
New York, Nov. 10-Following the
close of the present war, bankers ex-
pect a prosperous commercial era.
The bankers' opinion is based on the
belief that a period of general Euro-
pean reconstruction will set in
and, since Europe is so badly crip-
pled, American products will be great-
,y in demand.
At present speculation as to the
possibility of peace is two-sided, al-
though nothing definite may be said
on that score. Negotiations regarding
peace have not proceded to any great
extent up to now, however.
Steel, lumber, copper, grain, 'food
products, and machinery industries are
spoken of as those that will profit most
when the war closes. These products
are absolutely essential to the rebuild-
ing of Europe, and will necessarily
be ordered in large quantities.
Big Receipts Cause Decline in Wheat
Chicago, Nov. V.-Continued big
receipts of wheat took the edge off the
wheat market yesterday and prices
declined slightly. Several rallies were
evident during the day, but these were1
not permanent, so that the close was
somewhat lower than the preceding
day. Considerable wheat is being
bought by Germany and Austria, prin-
cipally from Bulgaria and Roumania.
Heavy Sales in N. Y, Stock Market
New York, Nov. 10.-Total stock
sales yesterday aggregated 1,133,0001
shares, while bond sales amounted to
$4,745,000 (par value). Many declines
were evident, heavy selling forcing7

war shares and railway stocks to
lower price levels 1

The Morning Yawn
Contributing Yawners May Make
the Column Longer by Ad-
dressing: Editor The
Yawn, The Michi-
gan Daily.

The genial Mr. Lardner
Has made a modest claim:
He's not picked a single winner
This year in ANY game.
But, ah, dear Ring, we've got you beat,
And that's why we're in debt;
We've picked each and every winner
Save those on which we've bet.
P. P. Overheard This One
At the rifleclub shoot:
"Did he miss again"
"Sure; didn't you hear him shoot?"
"There's one good thing about an
atheist."
"And what is that, pray tell?"
"He never falls asleep in church."
A Cork-Maybe
John D. Rockefeller says that he
has never touched whiskey in his life.
We're wondering how much there
would be left for the rest of us if he
had.
That Fatal Thoughtlesssness
"I see Miss Flumpits has broken her
engagement with Jones.''
"Yes. On the inside of the ring he
gave her was inscribed, 'Faithful to
the Last.'
"Well ?"
"He's been married before."
We claim the loser of the Penn-
Michigan game should play Yale.
Why not ping-pong?
AT THETHEATES
"The Only Girl"-she of the lilting
song and the graceful dance-is com-
ing to the Whitney Theater Saturday,
November 13, to tell,' in a burst of
song, the tale of her trials and
triumphs. "The Only Girl" is the colla-
borated work of Victor Herbert and
Henry Blossom, and is presented by
Joe Weber, who produced the play at
the Lyric theater, New York, where it
ran for almost an entire year. While
the chorus is not large, the girls have
been selected for their leauty and are
said to be more satisfying than a stage
full of ordinary chorus girls.
A real musical comedy will open at
the Majestic theater tonight. "Tickets
Please" is the best musical show that
Will M. Hough ever wrote, and Hough
is responsible for some good ones.
Billy Kent is the featured comedian
and he's really funny. In "Tickets
Please," he keeps his audience in a
gale of laughter from start to finish.
Boy's Conference to Meet in Kazoo
The Y. M. C. A. Older Boys' confer-
ence, of which many Michigan men
are ex-members, will be held this year
in Kalamazoo on November 26, 27, 28.
Fletcher Brockman, , general secre-
tary of the international Y. M. C. A.
will be the chief speaker. Mr. Brock-
man has been in charge of the asso-
ciation's work in China for several
years.
Bartlett, '16, to Talk at Foresty Club
All* the joys and sorrows of a sum-
mer in a .logging camp will be related
by T. F. Bartlett, '16, tonight, at a
meeting of the Forestry club in room
G 217, natural science building. Mr.
R. H. Easterbrooks will read a paper
on "Tree Planting in the National
Forests."

i
i
i

SMITH COBRRECTS MISTAKE
NO UNIVERSITY BUILDING EVER
IN USE SUNDAY FOR COLLEGE
ACTIVITIES.
Editor of the Michigan Daily:
My attention has been called to
the communication in The Daily of
November 9, signed "One Whe Cares,"
'ith respect to the use of Sarah
Caswell Angell hall on Sunday. Per-
mit me to say that reservations of the
Sarah Caswell Angell hall or other
university buildings for purposes of
this sort are not made on Sunday. 1
have not seen the notice particular-
ly referred to of "Try-outs for the
Junior Play." If such a notice ap-
peared, it was evidently posted by
some one uninformed of the fact that
the Sarah Caswell Angell hall would
not be reserved for this purpose on
Sunday, and that such use of the hall,
without reservation, would not be per-
mitted.
S. W. SMITH,
Secretary.
Stanford to Erect Outdoor Playhouse
Palo Alto, Cal., Nov. 10-An outdoor
theatre for Stanford was raised yes-
terday from a mere possibility to a
probability, when a committee compos-
ed of representatives from faculty and
student organizations met to discuss
the question. A committee was ap-
pointed to choosea suitable site for
an open air theatre and to consider
the style of architecture.
Botanical Gardens to Supply Plants
In the future, inmates of the univer-
sity hospitals will not have to suffer
for lack of plantsandflowers instheir
rooms. As soon as there is sufficient
space in the greenhouses to permit
their growth, the botanical gardens
will supply the hospitals with grow-
ing plants.
Students, for the most safe, speedy,
reliable economical Parcel and Mes-
senger service, call 2028. nov3tf

Here's a sure tip on
dressing well this fall:
o R the best - looking
young men's suit made;
the right materials, the
style, the expert design and
t a ilor in g, the all-around
1000 satisfaction, ask for

0
00

Varsity Fifty Five
made by Hart Schaffner & Marx
For neat trimmings you
can't beat

\

Copyri ht Hart Sclnafner & Mama

Our Furnishings
New shirts, $1 to $4.50; Neat neckwear, 25c
to $1.
All weights in underwear, Spalding & Vassar Sweaters
Dress Gloves, $1 up. Collars the Latest Cut
LUTZ CLOTHING STORE
THE HOME OF HART SCHAFFNER & MARX

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Special
Prizes
For
Students

"LET'GO"
ZAL-GAZ GROTTO

1 Special
Prizes
For
Students

of Ann Arbor

66

irc

99

ms

)ya

0

at'Weinberg's Colliseum
Corner Fif th Avenue and Hill St.
Nov. 20 - 7-BIG DAYS-7 -Nov. 27

MAMMOTH INDOOR CIRCUS

li

STUDENT CONTEST

I

COLLECTED COLLEGE NEWS

I

OREGON STUDENT COUNCIL TO
DROP HONOR SYSTEM QUESTION
Eugene, Ore., Nov. 10.-The question
of the honor system at the university
of Oregon is dropped as far as the
student council is concerned. At a
meeting last 'night, the council went
on record as disapproving the honor
system at Oregon at present. The
committee reporting on the matter
gave as their reason for opposing its
adoption, the fact that no desire for
the honor system has come as yet
from tl students.

COACHES AND SPORT WRITERS
FAVOR GOAL KICK ABOLITION
Chicago, Nov. 10-Agitation to ab-
olish the goal kick following a touch-
down, has been started by football
coaches and sporting writers in the
West. The recent discussion of the
question is due to the result of Satur-
day's games, when Chicago defeated
the Badgers by one point on a goal
kick, and when both Illinois and Min-
nesota had a chance to win by the
same method.

J

"Hal" Smith
George Labadie
Thomas Soddy
Herbert Wilson

- - 200
- - 150
- - 150
- - 125

"Bill" Cochran -
Harry Gault -
John Maulbetsch -
Harry Parker -

- 100
- 100
- 100
- 100

"'Iat" Smith -
Cl iarles Lambert -
Fr ed Tinsman -

The following prizes Will be given to the Student having largest number of votes:
A $35.00 suit, $10.00 overcoat, made by Sam Burchfield; under 'wear, socks, garters, belt,
shirt, collar and tie, from Sam Davis; the best hat from Factor y Hat Store; a $5.00 pair of
shoes from Albert Lutz.
DONATED BY ZAL GAZ GROTTO CIRCUS ROYAL

100
75
75

Ballot Boxes at following placeri :

City Cigar Store, Huron Street
Procknam's Dairy Lunch, Huron Street
Stocken's Barber Shop, Huron Street
Chapman's Cigar Store, Liberty Street
Busy Bee
Jefferson's Billiard Hall
Cappie Runbelaw's

University Pharm acy, 1123S. Univ. Ave.
College Inn
Sugden's Drug Sti re
Cushing's Drug Store
Huston's
Grill Room
Goldman Bros.'

This year, the same as last year, Call Lyndon' or a good Flashlight.
"We'll be there." Stark Taxicab Co., octl4eod-thurs
2265. oct5tf nov5tf

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