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November 10, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-10

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I

THE DAILY'
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPLS

The

..Oda=

ut6faly

Phones:-Editorhal 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

I

VOL. XXVI. No. 32.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

4

SECURE SPEAKERS
FOR SEND-OFF AT
STATI ON-TONIGHT
"HAL" HULBERT, '14M, AND "TOM"
BOGLE, '12, TO INSTILL
PEP IN ROOTERS
Manager of "Mai" Offers Show
Expect Large Gathoring' Full of Spirit
of "Come-Back" to Send
Team Eastwards

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Object-Send-off of team to
Pennsy.
Plac--In front of University
hail.
Time---7:00 o'clock.
Station--Ana Arbor R. R.
Free show, Majestic - 9:05
p. m.

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Fireman Fireman!
Save the Ladies
Junior Relates Experiences in At-
tempting to Rescue Newberry
Women from Fire
It was 1:00 o'clock Tuesday morn-
ing. The brain-fagged junior tottered
down Maynard street, utterly wearied
of the world. "Tomorrow," thought
he, "the same old grind starts. Noth-
ing doing anywhere." By this time he
had reached the Newberry residence.
Just then- But let him tell it.
"I was walking along down by the
dorm when all of a sudden I heard the
doggonedest gong-ringing ever. 'Fire!'
I thought, and started over the lawn.
I didn't get far when I tripped over a
wire fence and slid along on my nose.
This hero business is not all it's
cracked up to be,' said I to my nose.
"I got under way again and reachkd
the State street entrance. This was
lighted. Up to the door I ran and
started jamming my finger first on one
and then on the other of the two push
buttons there, when I heard the idlest
snickering and gurgling I ever heard,
and looking to my left I saw what
seemed to be an iron cage filled with
a bunch of girls in kimonos, rain-coats
and what-nots.
"This was a dampener for heroic
ardor. However, I would be a hero,
and so I asked in a quavering tone of
voice: 'What's the matter here?'
"And a shy young thing whispered
back: 'Fire drill."'
TO SOON COMPLETE
FACULTY CAMPAIGN

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In an effort to have a more organ-
i-ed send-off, the student council has
secured two speakers for tonight, when
the team leaves for Pennsy. "Hal"
Hulbert, '14M, former president of the
council, and Tom Bogle, '12, former
football star and coach of De Pauw
university, are the two orators who
will talk to the rooters assembled at
the Ann Arbor station this evening.
They will speak from the heights of
the neighboring box cars.
According to present plans, the band
and students will assemble in front
of University hall promptly at 7:00
o'clock. From here, the band will
march down Williams street to the
Ann Arbor station with the students
executing a snake dance behind. Hal
Smith, '16, and Bob Bennett, '18, will
lead cheers en route, and will also of-
ficiate at the station, until the train
leaves at 7:42 o'clock.
Inorder to further this come-back
spirit of the students, the manager of
the Majestic has announced that he
will give a free show this evening at
9:05 o'clock. At this time, the stu-
dents will be the guests of the manage-
ment.
Despite the fact that the game with
Pennsylvania has no bearing on the
relative standing of Michigan on the
official football chart of the country,
every effort is being made to win this
final game of the 1915 season. The
come-back attitude of the entire stu-
dent body has been much in evidence,
and this spirit will finid some justifica-
tion if Michigan succeeds in defeating
Pennsy on Saturday.
If a crowd of 3,000 rooters turn out
for the departure of the team, they
will be certain of the fact that the stu-
dents are With them despite the disas-
trous results of the last three games,
and it will go a long ways towards
bringing a victory to the Maize and
Blue in this final struggle.
ADOPT NEW METHOD OF TRIALS
IN ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
Decide at Yesterday's Meeting Way of
Picking Final
Teams
The Oratorical Association, at an
open meeting yesterday afternoon,
adopted the first amendment proposed
to the constitution in regard to the
manner of holding Varsity debate try--
outs. As a result of this action, the
four debating societies will choose six
men ea h in theirhtryouts tonight.
These men will then go before the
faculty of oratory, acting as debating
coaches, to compete for places on the
two final teams.
VULCANS INITIATE NINE )LEN
Give Banquet in Honor of Neophytes
at Catalpa Inn
Vulcans, senior engineers honorary
society, initiated the following men
yesterday: Y. C. Buell, H. B. Bart-
holf, J. B. Breymann, E. C. Headman,
H. H. Phillips, L. C. Rowley, -T. P.
Soddy, T. Trelfa, and L. C. Wilcoxen.
Following the initiation a banquet was
given at the Catalpa Inn for the new
members.

Chairman H. E. Riggs Plans to
Every Department on Cam-
pus Canvassed

Have

12 LIFE-MEMBERSHIPS SECURED
With all the departmental commit-
tees now actively at work in the fac-
ulty Union canvass, Prof. H. E. Riggs,
chairman of the committees, hopes to
have a fairly complete result of the
campaign within two or three days.
Every department on the campus is
to be thoroughly canvassed in an ef-
fort to assist in raising the building
fund.
The plans for the campaign were
worked out in such a way that it would
be easy for those in charge of the
work to come in contact with their
parties, who in most cases are men in
their respective departments. The
convenience and efficiency of such a
plan was shown by a report made yes-
terday stating that within one hour
seven life-memberships and $100 were
subscribed in one department.
Two reports handed in to Professor
Riggs yesterday amounted to 12 life-
memberships and $200. Up to this
time quite a number of $100 and $200
subscriptions have been given by mem-
bers of the faculty. Some of the var-
ious departments of the campus have
not yet reported and it is estimated
that the final report will find almost
the'entire faculty behind the Union
project.
President Harry B. Hutchins was
the recieptent of a $1000 subscription
last week, given by a student's father.
The gooid work of the various commit-
tees has boosted the total much over
the $600,000 mark, and the end of
the week should place that total much
higher as but a few of the reports
have been handed in up to this time.
ANNOUNCE SENIOR COMMITTEES
Lawrence S. Roehm Named as Chair.
man of Social Committee
Senior literary committees appoint-
ed for the ensuing year yesterday by
President James B. Angell II are as
follows:
┬žocial committee: Chairman, Law-
rence S. Roehm; Boyd M. Compton,
Russell S. Collins, Alvin M. Bently,
Helen R. Ely, Charlotte B. Sites and
Ruth E. Kreger.
Finance: Chairman, George B. Fox;
Isabel Hicks. .
Auditing: Chairman, Melvin M. Bea-
ver; Clarence E. Ufer and William A.
Pearl.

TO COUNCIL PROHIBT
WESTERNCONTEST
INVITATIONS TO SEND FOOTBALL
TEAM TO THE COAST NEW
YEAR'S DECLINED
Tends Towards Exhibition
Athletic Office Receives Many Favor-
able Letters from Alumni
During Past Weeks
By action of the Senate Council last
evening, permission was refused Mich-
igan's 1915 Varsity football team to
play at Pasadena, California, on New
Year's day.
An invitation was received several
weeks ago from the Tournament of
Roses association at Pasadena, Cal.,
asking that the football team be al-
lowed to meet some representative
western college at their annual festi-
val. It was stated that alumni in the
west were clamoring to see a team
from their Alma Mater in action, and
that many thousands attended the
Tournament of Roses.
The athletic association refused the
invitation upon the grounds that the
Varsity could compete only under in-
tercollegiate auspices and upon an ath-
letic field belonging to a college or
university. The management of the
tournament then secured the Univer--
sity of California to meet Michigan,
and stated that the game would be
staged upon athletic grounds which
were the property of a college in Pasa-
dena.
At a meeting of the Board in Con-
trol of Athletics held on October 23,
it was decided to permit the Varsity
to meet the University of California
at Pasadena, Cal., on New Year's Day
in a game of football, providing the
rules and regulations were arranged
between some accredited representa-'
tive of the University of California and
Mr. Bartelme as director of outdoor
athletics at the University of Michigan.
An amendment was attached to the
motion, however, to the effect that the
acceptance of the invitation be condi--
tioned upon .the action of the Senate
Council. The steps taken by the Sen-
ate Council at last night's meeting are
final in the matter, and the western
game will not be scheduled this year.
The Senate'Council believed that such
a game, not under collegiate auspices,
and primarily for exhibition purposes,'
would not be to the best interests of
athletics at the university.
While it was maintained by the man-
agement of the Tournament of Roses
that their yearly festival was held un--
der public auspices and not under pri-
(Continued on Page Three)
Refers Hop Petition to Senate
Senate Council Recommends That It
be Accepted
The Senate Council at its meeting
last night referred this year's J-Hop
petition to the University Senate, with
the recommendation that it be grant--
ed. The petition is similar to the one
submitted last year, and is signed by
the presidents of all the junior classes
in the university.

FORMER DEAN OF COLUMBIA
IS NOW WARDEN AT SING SING
New York, Nov. 9.-Prof. George W.
Kirchwey, former dean of the Colum-
bia law school, and a member of the
prison commission, is at present in
charge of Sing Sing prison as deputy
warden, E. C. Church having resigned.
Professor Kirchwey is a close friend
of Warden Osborne and has been a
close observer of the reform move-
ment under Osborne's management.
The unofficial title which has been
conferred on Professor Kirchwey is
that of acting warden, but the princi-
pal keeper performs practically all of
the duties of the latter office. Profes-'
sor Kirchwey denied that his presence
indicated that he would supersede
Warden Osborne. According to his
statement, he has accepted the position
only that Mr. Osborne may have a rest
and get back in shape to continue his
reform activities.

Will Award M's
At Big Smoker
As announced yesterday, tickets tor
the Michigan Union's third annual
football smoker to be given on Tues-
day night, November 16, will go on sale
at the Union desk at 9:00 o'clock this
morning. Continuing over Thursday
and Friday, tickets will be sold to
members of the Union only, and on
Saturday the sale will be open to the
general student body. The price of
admission will be 25 cents.
The program is now jn preparation
and will be announced within a few
days. As the awarding of "M's" will
take place at this time, it is expected
that the students will be on hand to
give their respect to this year's Var--
sity in its final general get-together.
lRI511 SEE UNITED STATES AS
WitORLDS NAVAL Powily SOON
Predict American Expenditures Will
Equal England's; London Im-
pressed by Progruni
London, Nov. 9.-The fullest details
of the new American naval plan yet1
published on this side of the ocean
are given in this mornng's issue of
the Daily Telegraph, which in com-
menting on them says that "among
other things the British fleet has done1
is to convince the people of the United1
States that their country requires a
large navy.,,
"We have," the Daily Telegraph
adds, "the spectacle of the greatest
democracy in the world, although sep-
arated from Europe by more than 3,000
miles, in such a hurry for more men--
of-war that it has decided not even to
wait for* the lessons on construction
and armament which the war may1
teach. Moreover, this decision has
been reached by a party which came
into power in opposition to the Roose--
veltian policy of the 'big stick' and
pledged itself to economy in arma-
ments.1
"The hostilities in Europe have tm-
pered the extreme pacificisms of
Americans. Although already possess-
ing a navy held by many to be second
to none in the world, they are dtcr--
mined to have a still greater one. Thc
new American ships of the line willt
cost over $17,500,000 each.
KITCHENER SEEMSA
BOUNDFOR iNDIA
Trouble Appears to Divert Path of War
Lord from Balkans; Visits the
ialian King En Route
GERMANY CAUSE OF TENSION1
Washington, Nov. 9.-Reports de--
scribed as confidential were current
here today that the ultimate destina-
tion of Lord Kitchener on his present
mission to the east is India and not
the Balkans. According to these 're--
ports the situation in India has taken'
on a most serious aspect. No con--
firmation of these reports have been
made by any official quarter.
In diplomatic circles, particularly in
those vitally interested in the fate of
India and the British military opera-
tions, it was said that nothing was
known of Kitchener's alleged mission,
to take charge of the situation in India.
Trouble in India in its present form

is said to have resulted from tie depo-
sition of the Anzan of Hygerabag by
his people. German influences are
credted with being responsible for the
increased tension in India.
Earlier in the day reports game from
The Sun correspondent at Rome that
the British war earl was crossing the
Italian peninsula. Kitchener, on his
route supposedly to Serbia, took the
overland route in order to visit the
Italian king and confer with General
Cadorna.
Establish Normal Course for Convicts
Berkeley, Cal., Nov. 9.-The Univer-
sity of California announces that with
the establishment of a normal corre-
spondence course at Folsom peniten-
tiary, the inmates of that institution
now have the advantage of a complete
course from primary instruction to
full university training. Fourteen
prisoners, the university authorities
say, have enrolled in the normal
course for teachers.

NAE J-HOP OFICIALS
TOMORROW AT MEETING
OF '17 LITERRYCLSS
Choose Chairman and Committeemen
for Biggest Social Event of
the Year
CONSIDER PLANS IMMEDIATELY
AVTER ELECTION OF OFFICIALS
OFFER REPORTS OF TIE SOCIAL
AND ATHLE~TIC COM--
MITTEES
Machinery for the 1916 J-Hop will
begin moving when the chairman of
the Hop committee and four other
members are elected at a class meet-
ing of the junior lits to be held tomor--
row afternoon at 4 :00 o'clock in room
101, economics building.
Following this, the junior classes of
the other colleges will choose their
representatives on the Hop committee
as soon as possible. The committee
consists of 15 members, of whom five,
including the chairman, are chosen by
the junior fits, four by the junior engi-
neers, two by the junior laws, and one
each by the junior medics, homeops,
pharmics and dents. After the selec-
tion of the entire committee, plans for
the flop will be taken up and pushed
immediately.
At the meeting tomorrow afternoon,E
members of the 1917 literary class will
be informed by their treasurer of the
new rule passed by the student coun--
cil, that hereafter all class dues not
paid during the semester of assess-
ment will be increased 50 per cent at
the time of payment. Settlement of!
all dues must be made by each student
before graduation.
Reports giving the plans of the so-t
cial and athletic committees will be
offered.
FRENCHMEN COME TO ISIT
MANUFACTORIES IN AMERICA
New York, Nov. 9-The six mem-
bers of the French Commercial Coin--
mission who are in this country to1
.tudy our manufactories, preparatory
to buying east quantities of machineryt
with which to rebuild the ruined in-
dustries of France, arrived today on
the liner "Lafayette." Two of them
came direct from the front and another
from the military hospital whither the
explosion of a German shell had sentl
him last June.
ENGINEERING SOCIETY )LAKES
NOMINATIONS FOR THE YEAR
At the business meeting of the En-
gineering society held last night the,
following nominations were made:,
President, J. N. Brown, '16E, and H.
A. Taylor, '17E; vice-president, F. C.
Riecks, '16E, and H. Miller, '6E; se-
r('ary, E. H. Merritt, '16E; treasurer,
H. Warner, '16E, and F. H. Sweet, '8E.
Election will be by ballot in Engineer-
ing society rooms on date to be an-
nounced.
G~ermuany Anxious Over Early Winter
Rotterdam, Nov. 9.-Great anxiety
exists in Germany, the Telegraaf says,
because of the unusually early win--
ter, which began October 28 with
frost and a heavy snowfall in Berlin.
WHAT'S GOING ON

TODAY
Fresh engineering assembly, 348 new
engineering building, 11:00 o'clock.
Graduate memorial service for Dean
Guthe, Memorial hall, 4:00 o'clock.
Vesper services, Newberry hall, 5:00
o'clock.
Band meets, front of U hall, 7:00
o'clock.
Alpha Nu meeting, Alpha Nu rooms,
7:30 o'clock.
Tryouts for Adelphi Central league
preliminaries, Adelphi rooms, 7:30
o'clock.
Final tryout's for Comedy club cast,
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, 7:30
o'clock.
Northwestern club meeting, Michigan
Union, 7:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
IMiss Dora Keen lectures, new science
auditorium building, 8:10 o'clock.
J-lit class meeting, 101 economics
building, 4:00 o'clock.

FOURHUNDRED GO
DOWN WITH LINER
IN MID-TLNTIC
REPORT VIOLENT FIGHTING IN
LOOS DISTRICT; FRENCH HAVE
SLIGHT ADVANTAGE
Italians Continue Advancing
Austrians Consider Abandonment of
First Line Defense on the
Southern Frontier
Rome, Nov. 9.-According to a re-
port reaching Rome tonight, the Ital-
ian liner Ancona, which sailed from
Genoa a few days ago with 339 pas-
sengers in the steerage and a large
number of first-class passengers, has
been sunk in mid-Atlantic.
No details are now available as to
the number of lives lost. While in-
formation is lacking as to the cause,
it is generally believed the ship was
attacked by a German submarine.
Artillery Scorching West Front
Paris, Nov. 9.--Loos again is the
scene of violent and eccentric fighting,
according to the official statement is-
sued today. No marked change is re-
corded at this point, but to the south
of the town the French have had the
advantage in encounters, of patrols,
The artillery engagements in the
Champagne district continued with
great energy in Tahure and the Butte-
du-Messil. Beausejour also was the
scene of heavy artillery fighting. In
the Vosges the French by the use of
cannon demolished an enemy block-
house.
Entente Moves Secretly at Saloniki
London, Nov. 9.-Behind the veil of
censorship, Britain and her allies were
doing something tremendous in the
Balkans. Just what the movement is,
how great the force is that is being
landed, or when the men are coming
is not known, but there is enough evi-
dence to show that the German drive
to Constantinople is not going to be
completed without the fiercest kind of
opposition.
Newspapers of Berlin, according to
advices received here, say the allies
have landed 300,000 men at Saloniki,
Greece, and that the ships are still
coming in.
Italians Repulse Austrians
Rome, Nov. 9.-The Italians still
hold positions in the Golomites, ac-
cording to the official statement issued
today. The Austrians attacked this
position last night, but were repulsed,
and in a counter attack which followed
the Italians advanced their position
to include the summit of Mount Sief.
Rome, Nov. 9.-Emperor Francis Jo-
seph of Austria has conferred with
General Soglioflias, in charge of the
barrier fortifications on the Italian
frontier which the emperor recently
inspected with Archduke Frederick.
The archduke urged the expediency of
the retirement to the second line of
defense, since the Italian pressure has
increased the ground gained on the
Carso plateau alone by a space of 12
miles long and three miles deep.
Marchand Will Return Soon

Paris, Nov. 9.-General Marchand,
writing to the front, says he expects
to resume his command within six
weeks. He has been here for some
time on a furlough.
Dean J. R. Effinger Talks to Freshmen
Dean J. R. Effinger will address
members of the fresh lit class at the
first assembly which will be held next
Monday in U hall at 4:00 o'clock. He
will speak on "College Manners and
Mannerisms." As this is the first as-
sembly of the year, all freshmen are
expected to be present.

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Ad W. Righter says:
It is just as important that
you advertise, no matter how
large or small your business, as
it Is that you purchase merch-
andise to resell.
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