100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 07, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

he

ichigan

Dai

LD ANJ

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1915.

I'

I

by

Wis-

STAR

s te

e opening of
by trouncing
gregation on
ernoon. The

not par-I

COSMOPOLITAN CLUJ3 DESIRES
NUJMBEB OF AlIERICAN ,MEIMBERS
President Robertson Seeks to Raise
T14otal Enrollment to Over
250
When the Cosmopolitan Club con-
venes for its initial meeting of the
year at the parish building of the
Unitarian church at 7:30 o'clock this
evening, it is the especial wish of the
officers of the club, according to Pres-
ident W. Robertson, of South Africa,
that there may be a considerable num-
ber of American students present to
help welcome the new foreign stu-
dents who will be there.
According to Mr. Robertson, it will
be an especial policy of the club this
year to strive to correct the errone-
ous impression that seems to be quite
prevalent, that the club is limited to
foreign students exclusively.
"Nothing could be farther from he
real purpose of the club," stated r -
ertson, "because it is the fundamnital
principle of the organization to afford
a medium through which the foreign-
ers may come into- touch with the
American students and with the men
of other countries, so that a real sym-
pathetic understanding may . result
when these men come into the posi-
tions of influence in their home coun-
tries."
The organization will this year
strive to raise its membership to 250,
so that it will really become an ef-
fective influence at Michigan for pr'o-
moting a real cosmopolitan spirit. j
After there has been a discussion of
the plans for the year, the meeting
tonight will be turned into a short
social gathering. Refreshments will
be served and a short program, in-
cluding several songs by F. W. Gro-
ver, of last year's opera, and several
selections by students from the school
of music will be given.
PRQMINENT MEN OPENLY
SUPPORT SUFFRAGE CAUSE

ed last night
Michigan fell
t total regis-

ficant
in a
in, as

particu-
t of the

time
td ap-
Smith
rther.

asion as
r a sig-

to Lawrence, and
r less futile at-
Michigan line, El-
, who was thrown
ard line. Zeiger
s thrown outside.
ghed through for
ed. Elliot punted
r, but suffered the
g "Pat" Smith un-
" tucked the ball
id ran 25 yards
feld, bowling over
l almost incapaci-
that eventually

A minute later Benton threw a pass
to Staatz, and Michigan registered
her first touchdown. Benton failed at
goal and the score stood 6 to 0 with
barely -four minutes consumed.
The Michigan squad scored once
(Continued, on Page Three)
EX-MAYOR OF TOLEDO DIES
AFTER DISAPPEARAA 'C
(By the New York Sun Service.)
Detroit, Oct. 6.--Former Mayor of
Toledo Robert H. Finch, who has been
missing for five and one-half years,
died here at 2:45 o'clock this after-
noon. His two sons left Toledo for
this city this morning, but would not
give out Whether their father had died
in a hospital or in his home. It is
believed here that he went under an
assumed name.
It is not known whether he has teen
in Detroit'during all of his absence,
but his sons said that of late he had
been employed at the Ford plant. At
the time of Finch's disappearance in
1910, it was said that "there was a
woman in the case," a domestic in the
Finch household. Rumors of their
marriage were never confirmed.
C. P. Drury, '14, Succeeds Dr. Elliot
Charles P. Drury, '14M, formerly
resident physician at the University
hospital, has been appointed to the
staff of University Health Service phy-
sicians to succeed Dr. Joseph A. El-
liott. Dr. Elliott is now second as-
sistant to Dr. Udo J. Wile, of the Med-
ical college. Dr. Frank Senear, who
formerly served as second assistant
tn Dr. Wile, has now been made his

(By the New York Sun Service.)
New York, Oct. 6.--A group of well-
known men have replied to the work-
ers in the recent suffrage campaign
and have submitted their reasons for
being in favor of an amendment to
the state constitution permitting
equal suffrage.
Among them are Thomas A. Edison,
George Harvey, William A. Hughes
and former Governor Franklin and
President Stevens, of Stevens Insti-
tute.
The reasons were in part that, in.
view of the principles of democracy,
it is unjust that one-half of the popu-
lation should be deprived of repre-
sentation in a government in which
they share one-half of the burden.
They further declared that in all jus-
tice and expediency women should be
allowed to vote.
PROF. W. T. JIUSSEY RETURNS
FROM LA PLATA UNIVERSITY
(By the New York Sun Service.)
New York, Oct. 6.-Prof. W. J. Hus-
sey, director of the observatory of the
University of Michigan and for the
last two years at the University, Qf
La Plata, arrived here today from La
Plata on the. liner, Bestria. During
his stay at the Argentine institution,
he has been at work on measurements
and deteriinations of double star,
and has found that 300 stars wh
were formerly considered single, re
really of the double type.
He has also discovered three new
comets; one of which is distinguished
by the fact of its great distance from
the sun. He is now on his way home
to Ann Arbor.

PRESIDENT WISUN
EWALTHI WIDOW
Announcement Comes as Surprse to
All But Intiniate Friends of
Nation's Executive
FORMER WIFE DEAD15 MONTHS
irs. Norman alt, Native Virginian,
Bride-to-Be
(By the New York Sun Service.)
Washington, D. C., Oct. 6.-Wash-
ington circles received a distinct sur-
prise today when President Woodrow
Wilson announced his engagement to
Norman Galt, a resident of the
r : : city.
fldmors of the engagement of the
chief executive have been current in
White House circles for only a short
time, and were unknown to the city
at large. Intimate friends of the
president think that the engagement
has been of short duration.
Mrs. Galt is the widow of Norman
Galt, formerly part owner of one of
Washington's large jewelry stores.
He has been dead eight years. Mrs.
Galt is now owner of the concern, and
it is operated for her by her two
brothers.
Mrs. Galt is a native of Virginia, the
home state of the president.
The president's former wife died
just before the outbreak of the pres-
ent European war in July, 1914.
Li
SUNDAYIEVNING"Y
MEETINGS To BE HELD
TIN UNIVERSITY KHALL
Inability to Use Majestic Forces Cab-
inet to Select New Gath-
ering Place
PICK HENRY RUMMEL, '16L, TO
HEAD MEMBERS1lP CAMPAIGN
WILL PROBABLY INVITE ROBINS
FOR SOCIAL SERVICE WORK
After being advised that it would
be impossible to hold the regular Sun-
day evening Majestic meetings this
year because the theater is to house
a moving pictureshow, the Y. M. C. A.
cabinet at its meeting last night voted
to hold the meetings during the com-
ing year in Univ'ersity Hall.
Although no definite arrangements
have been made as yet, it is thought
that specialists in various profession-
al and industrial lines will be secured
to address the meetings so that the
individuality of the departmental units
may be maintained at the same time
that the entire campus is being
served.
While the committee in charge of
the meetings can make no definite
announcement at this time, it is hoped
to start the series of meetings about
the last Sunday in October.
Announcement was also made at
the meeting of the appointment of
Henry Rummel, '16L, as general
nan of a membership campaign
a the "Y" will put on the early
pari of next week. The membership

goal for this year has been set at'
2,000, and it is expected that a com-
mittee of 150 men will take .part in
the actual solicitation of the campus.
A bid will also. be made for the
presence of Raymond Robins to cqn-
duct a social service campaign on the
campus some time during March of
next year. At the Geneva conference
held last June, Robins made such an!
impression on the Michigan delegation
of 40 students, that the vote of the
cabinet at the meeting last night was
unanimous in favor of bringing him
to Michigan.
Miss Clara Dunn Confined to Hospital
Miss Clara Dunn, formerly librarian
in the rhetoric department of the uni-
versity, has been, taken ill and is now
confined to the University hospital.
Miss Dunn suffered a nervous break-
down after she had left An Arbor to
teach in an Illinois normal school.

ARABIC lDETAILS UNARRANGED
Von Bernstorff and Lansing See tho,
Need of Immediate Settlement
(By the New York Sun Service.)
Washington, Oct. 6.-No arrange-
monts concerning the details of the
settlement of the Arabic controversy
have been made between Count Von
Bernstorff and Secretary Lansing.
The reason assigned was that there
was no immediate need of a complete
and final settlement.
Von Bernstorff left today for Cedar
Hurst, the summer home of the Ger-
man ambassador.
UNION DANCES BEGIN SATURDAY;
TICKET SALE THIS AFTERNOON
Membership dances will be held
every Saturday evening at the Mich-
igan Union again this year, starting
next Saturday, October 9. The com-
mittee this week is as follows: C. K.
Patterson, '17, chairman, , Kemp S.
Burge, '17, A. D. Bromley, '17, Rolla
Carpenter, 17. Ray Mills, '16L, will
be general chairman of dances at the
Union this year. The chaperones'for
the first dance will be Dr.. and Mrs.
Reuben Peterson and Mr. and Mrs.
William F. Marsteller. Tickets will
be on sale at the Union desk at five
o'clock this afternoon. "Ike" Fisher's
orchestra will produce .the ragtime
and light refreshments will be served.
Will Establish Institute of Radium
(By the New York Sun Service.)
New York, Oct. 6.-Dr. Fields, pres-
ident of the Radium Chemical com-
pany, announced today that an insti-
tute of radium, similar to those of Eu-
rope, would be established in this
country. Work will be done by the
institution to study the therapeutic
effects of radium. Dr. Fields' concern
has contracted to supply the institute
with $120,000 worth of radium a
month.
NEW ENROLLMENT
PROMISES TO PASS
PREVIUS TOTALS

UNION TO HAVE BIG 0
HOUSE TOMORROW
Coach Yost, Professors Ail
Bunker, and W. A. P. Job
Give. Talks
Edward J. Crumpacker, '161
man of the Open House nigh
staged at the Union at 8:15
tomorrow night, has practical
pleted arrangements for the ;
Every male student in the um
will be welcomed, especially
men.
Coach Fielding 1-. Yost
present at the affair, and is e
to give a short talk urging
maintain Michigan's athletic
ards. Harold Smith, '16, theine
verine yell master, will leac
stand-bys primarily for the
the new men. Prof. J. R. A
the Engineering college, an
Robert Bunker, of the Law
will give "pep" talks.
Chase Sikes, '16, Roy Scanlo
and a freshman piano wizard
for the present as the "Dark
Wonder," will give brief se:
"Ike" Fischer has promised t
hand to 'furnish band music
help out in the songs. W. A. :
(Continued on Page Sb
To Spend $100,000 in Tuberculo
Michigan's $100,000 war on
culosis is on. It is the objec
state board of health to rid tb
of this disease. Local organ
are being formed in all count
the campaign will include an
to locate each case of tuberci'
the county. Nurses will vis
patients in their homes.

len and
I to

Records of
Average
as
SIGMA UPS
OF L]
AUTHORIT:

'16 L,h

,:

Increase of 449 Over
Same Time
1914

Mark Set
in

at

I COUNT SHOWS A BIG GAIN

Engineers,

Architects

and Homeops

Show Decrease
* * * * * * * * *
ENROIJJIENT FIGURES

DATE
Now
Lit College ...2,850
Eng. & Arch...1,464
Dental College. 340
School of Law. 393
Medicine ....320
Grad. School.. 189
School of Phar. 144
Homeopathy .. 60
5,737
*Decrease.
* * * * * * *

Ago
2,515
1,471
295
334
305
191
100
70
5,274

* *
TO
Gain
335
*7
45
59
15
*2
14,
*10
449

John,

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
* }
*,

* * * *

*I

Michigan's 1915-16 enrollment fig-
ures, including yesterday's registra-
tions, have reached a total of 5,737,
according to reports given out by the
officials in the different colleges. This
is a gain of 449 over the count of 5,274
for the same time last year, with the
bulk of the increase due to the big
gain made in the literary college fig-
ures.
With several days left in which to
enroll, registration figures for the
College of Literature, Science and the
Arts have already eclipsed the grand'
total for 1914-15. According to a
statement late yesterday afternoon,
there were approximately 2,850 per-
sons enrolled in the college, while last
year the final count was 2,718. This
means that 132 more persons have al-
ready enrolled this year than the total
number for 1914-15.
Figures for the College of Medicine
were 320, 15 more than the t'otal of
305 for the same time last year, while
the Dental college made its margin
over last year's count even larger

heed their
Scholarship at Michigan showed a other horse
decided improvement during the past ment, "Her
school year, as is evidenced by' com- Ppe
parative charts compiled by Registrar The Anse
A. G. Hall, None of the general cial organ
groups, comprising fraternities, soror- that the p
ities and other house clubs, shows a tions for a
lower average during 1914-1915, than nations.
the previous year, and several new
marks were set up. . Berlin,
Two years ago, the average of gen- German re
eral fraternities was below C grade, the taking
and one year ago but slightly above. kon on An
Last year, however, general fraterni- Many just
ties placed well above the C average, grounds th
Only seven general fraternities now rsusdsdth
average below C, as compared to desaidt
twelve the previous year. ages contai
The greatest rise in averages dur-
ing 1914-1915, is in all general frater-
nities and professional fraternities, that Franc
closely followed by all house tria, is ill
clubs. General sororities and other Durian, m
women's clubs show abo'ut half the and Count
amount of gain that the general fra- have been
ternities and other professional fra- have also c
ternities made. Sigma Upsilon Psi ily.
now stands at the head of all general
fraternities, with Phi Delta Phi lead- Berlin,
ing all professional fraternities. None Duchy of Li
of the sororities falls below a mark plaint to th
half way between C and B, with the ing the bo
Collegiate Sorosis closest to the B Luxepbour
line, lies.
Three years ago, one or two of the
league houses were above B grade, STATE D1
but for the past two years 'no organ- RE
ization has been'^ above that mark.
This year, however, two league houses
have averaged better than B, the Vfl"s of
Mogk house attaining a position two- Said
fifths of the way from B to A. It
must be remembered, however, that
the league houses comprise much (By the
smaller groups than the fraternities Washingi
or other organizations. partment
The order in which the organiza- resignation
tions appear on the chart in matter consul-get
of standing, is as follows: General nation wa
sororities, professional sororities, oth- the state
er women's clubs, all' house clubs, partisansh
professional fraternities, other men's played for

First Faculty
torium, 4:15

TODAY
Concert, Hill
o'clock.

Audi-I

Cosmopolitan Night, at the Unitarian
church, 8:00 o'clock,
Student council meets in north wing,
7:30 o'clock.
Deutscher Verein executive meeting,
. at the Deutscher Verein room, 7:30
o'clock.
TOMORROW
Freshman "pep" meeting at Hill Audi-
torium, 7:15 o'clock.
Open House, at the Michigan Union,
8:00 o'clock.

(Continued

Page Six)

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan