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November 09, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-09

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e

THE DAILY
NEWS OF THEWORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

'The

Michigan

Daily

Phones:-Editorial 414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL.. XXVI. No. 31. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1915. PRICE FIVE CENTS

UNPAID SODIERS
STORM LEGATION
IN MEXICAN CITY
VILLA COMMANDER PAYS MEN BY
LEVYING FOCED LOAN ON
RESIDENTS
- WOMEN AID MEN IN RIOTING
News is Also Received that Carranza
Troops Have Looted Man.
zanillo
El Paso, Texas, Nov. 8.-A mob com-
posed of unpaid Villa soldiers, civil-
ians and women raided the German
consulate in Chihuahua, burned the
market house and looted the head-
quarters of the confiscation agency,
according to an American who arrived
here today from Chihuahua.
After the rioting, the Villa comman-
der in Chihuahua levied a forced loan
of $100,000 in Mexican gold on the mer-
chants and wealthy residents in order
to pay the rioting troops, according to
the story told by the refugee.
The rioting began when the soldiers
made a 'demand upon the officers of
the garrison for their pay. Having
no money, the commander attempted
to call them off by promising them
money afterward. The men refused to
be placated, and proceeded to the mar-
ket place.
Joined here by many men and wom-
en, the soldiers took possession of the
market house and, after having taken
out large quantities of food, set fire
to it. They then forced their way into
the German consulate.
The silver and lead bullion belong-
ing to the Chihuahua Mining company
is said to have been seized. The forced
loan was used to pay off the troops
and the mob dispersed.
Simultaneous with this report news
was received here that Carranza sol-
diers had looted Manzanillo.
CONGRESSMAN MILLER SCORES
GOVERNOR OF PHILIPPINES
Duluth, Minn., Nov. 8.-Clarence V.
Miller, of this city, representative in
congress from the Fifth Minnesota dis-
trict, returned a few days ago from his
second visit to the 'Philippine islands.
Governor Harrison Burton has brought
about in the islands what Representa-
tive Miller characterizes as a "com-
plete governmental chaos." From the
floor of the next house he will plead
for a speedy improvement of present
conditions.
"It is difficult for one who has inves-
tigated conditions to speak calmly. It
will be even more difficult for the
American people to realize conditions
in the Philippines. Before Governor
Harrison arrived the machinery of
government was working harmonious-
ly and all were rejoicing. Now every-
where the situation is strained."
CORNELL UNIVERSITY RECEIVES
LARGE BEQUEST FOR DORMS
Ithaca, N. Y, Nov. 8.-The trustees
of Cornell university in session here
today announced that George Baker,
chairman of the First National Bank
of New York, is the donor of the fund
of $260,000 for three Cornell dormi-
tories. Mr. Baker made his original
gift of $160,000 two years ago, and a
supplementary gift of $100,000 last
January. His name was withheld at

his request and has just been made
known.
TEUTONIC GOVERNMENT DENIES
IT MANUFACTURES PASSPORTS
Washington, Nov. 8.-The charge of
German spies executed in England that
German officers found with false
American passports possess complete
paraphernalia for making such false
passports is unqualifiedly denied by
the German government in a note re-
ceived at the state department today.
Report Disastrous Fire at Culver
Culver, Ind., Nov. 8.-A recent fire
at, the Culver Military academy de-
stroyed the entire Black Horse troop
of eighty-five horses when the stables
in which they were kept burned. The
place of these horses will be hard to
fill, for they were all well-trained,
high-spirited, jet-black animals.

Sent to Dentist;
Then to Battle
French Soldiers Have Teeth ixed
Before Tackling Hardtack
in Trenches
Paris, Nov. 8.-Dentists have return-
ed to the defense of "la patrie" 60,000
men who otherwise would have been
unable to continue fighting. This
number is equivalent to two French
army corps.
With the opening of the present war
most of the Parisian dentists offered
their services free both to the wound-
ed and to private citizens who because
of dental defects could not be accept-
ed as soldiers.
Hundreds of men were unable to
masticate army rations. These have
been rendered capable of military ser-
vice, while thousands of others who
have come back from the front with
their teeth and jaws shot away have
been put in trim to return to the
ranks.
MICHIGAf FCULTY MEN
BACK UNION CAMPAIGN
ON UNIVERSITY CAMPUS
Prof. H. E. Riggs, Engineering Col-
lege, Appointed General Chair-
man of Committees
BELIEVE ALL TEACHERS WILL
TAKE OUT LIFE MEMBERSHIPS
55 PERCENT OF LAW PROFESSORS
HAVE ALREADY PROMISED
TO CONTRIBUTE
Michigan's faculty is strong in its
support for the new Union clubhouse
project, according to the earliest re-
ports made by the faculty committee-
men. Although actual solicitation has
hardly begun, more than 25 per cent
of the faculty have already subscribed
to the building fund.
Prof. H. E. Riggs, of the engineer-
ing college, has been appointed chair-
man of the faculty campaign commit-
tees, and with the exception of the lit-
erary and medical colleges, all the
various departmental committees have
been fully appointed.
Reports late Saturday night indicat-
ed that the law, dental and medical
faculties were leading in the number
of subscriptions. The summary of re-
ports of the various committees, with
the per cent subscribed, were as fol-
lows:
Pharmacy ..................14
Homeopathic ............... 23
Dental ..................... 44
Medical...................35
Law ....................... 55
Engineering ................ 23
Literary ...................27
Physics...................13
Science...................26
Chemistry ..................15
Administration, Library and
general offices ............ 24
The various committees have been
selected according to the different
buildings on the campus, so that the
canvassers might easily come in con-
tact with those on their lists It is ex-
pected that every member of the fac-
ulty will at least take a life member-
ship.
PLAN SEND-OFF FOR VARSITY
Student Council Arranges for Snake
Dance and Yells

Plans are being made by the student
council to have a brilliant send-off
given the team when it leaves Ann
Arbor tomorrow evening for Philadel-
phia. Efforts are being made to have
the band lead the students to the sta-
tion, where cheers will be led by Hal
Smith and short speeches will be given
by members of the faculty and under-
graduate body.
The students will gather at Univer-
sity hall at 7:00 o'clock, from where
they will snake-dance behind the band
to the Ann Arbor station, where the
team leaves at 7:42 o'clock. This will
be the last opportunity that the stu-
dents will have to show they are be-
hind the team, and the same "come-
back" spirit so evident this fall will
go a' long way toward sending the
squad of players and rooters to Pennsy
with the attitude to win firmly im-
pressed upon them.

REPORTS INIATE
ROT GAIN IN UNION'S
NATIONAL CANVAS
GRAND TOTAL PASSES $600,000
MARK IN $1,000,000
CAMPAIGN
WILLBREAK GROUND IN SPRING
Detroit, Chicago, New York City and
Minneapolis Lead Country in
Huge Project
Latest returns from the Michigan
Union's national campaign place the
building fund total at $503,318.50, ex-
clusive of the $100,000 raised by stu-
dent life memberships, this amount
bringing up the grand total to $603,000
at the end of the first week of the
November canvass. While there was
a noticeable let-down in the returns
following the 30-day extension of time,
the local committees are again hard
at work, and the rapid growth of the
huge fund insures the success of the
nation-wide project.
Ground will be broken in the spring
in preparation for the actual build-
ing of the Union's new million dollar
home, as $600,000 was set as the
amount which must be raised before
the actual work of construction should
begin.
Detroit, Chicago, New York, Min-
neapolis and Ann Arbor now lead all
other cities in subscriptions turned in,
the committees in all these places hav-
ing reported totals ofkmore than $20.-
000, the Detroit workers alone report-
ing a total of $160,150. .
Chicago ranks second with $58,985,
with returns still coming in steadily.
New York City and Minneapolis are
running neck and neck in the race
for third place in the totals, the east-
ern city now leading with $27,900, to
$25,450 for the Minneapolis commit-
tee. Ann Arbor has already -reported
$20,546, and the November campaign
among the faculty men has only just
begun.
Cincinnati, Toledo, Cleveland, Kan-
sas City, Milwaukee, Los Angeles, Bos-
ton, Philadelphia and Pittsburg rank
among the leading cities outside of
the state, most of these cities having
already contributed more than $5,000
to the building fund. Among the
state cities, Lansing, Bay City, Sag-
inaw, Port Huron, Grand Haven and
Alpena are in the lead, with the ex-
ception of Ann Arbor, which contains
a much larger proportion of alumni
and faculty men.
Dean Bates will go to Milwaukee on
Thursday in the interests of the Union
campaign While in that city he will
be joined by Eugene J. Carpenter of
Minneapolis, and Fred Smith of De-
troit. These three men will visit Du-
luth on Friday, and go on to St. Paul
and Minneapolis on Saturday, calling
upon prominent alumni as well as
meeting with the committee chairmen
of the local committees in all three
cities.
Chairman L. Barringer, of the
Charleston, W. Va., committee, has
made one of the best reports yet re-
ceived at the central office. He has
reported a total of $1,200 from 14
alumni in his section, with 15 Michi-
gan graduates still to be seen. Among
those contributing is Phillip Waters,
'95L, now a prominent Charleston citi-
zen, whose daughter is now in the
university.

FOOTBALL SMOKER TICKETS{
60 ON SALE AT UNION DESK
Lee Joslyn, '17, Named as Chairman
of Program Committee
for Affair
Tickets for the Michigan Union's
third annual football smoker to be
given at Waterman gymnasium on
Tuesday night, November 16, will go
on sale at the Union desk at 9:00
o'clock tomorrow. The first three days
of sale, Wednesday, Thursday and Fri-
day, will be to members of the Union
only, while the tickets for the general
student body will go on sale Saturday
morning. The price of admission has
been set at 25 cents.
Lee Joslyn, '17 has been appointed
chairman of the program committee.
The program, will be announced with-
in a few days.

CREW OF FRENCH LINER
FIGHTING FIRE T SEA
OFF COSTOF HAIFAX
Dispatch to Agent Says Ship is Now
in No Danger of Sinking;
Everything All Right
BLAZE BELItVED TO BE MOST
RECENT WORK OF PLOTTERS
CAPTAIN REPORTS HE WILL PUT
IN AT HALIFAX IF NEC-
ESSARY
New York, Nov. 8.-The French liner
Rochambeau, a quadruple screw tur-
bine, and one of the most popular
steamships in the transatlantic trade
since the withdrawal of the larger and
swifter vessels following the outbreak
of the war, was reported here today
as being afire in an unknown position
off the coast near Halifax.
The fire is in the reserve coal bunker
of the vessel. The boat is thought to
be only about a half-day out from New
York. General Agent Fauget, of the
French line, received from Captain
Jauhm, of the Rochambeau, the follow-
ing dispatch about 3:30 o'clock this
afternoon:
"We are fighting fire in the reserve
coal bunker. If we do not succeed in
extinguishing it we will put into Hali-
fax. Everything all right. No danger."
Mr. Fauget said he thought that the
fire was probably caused by spontane-
ous combustion and that in all prob-
ability few persons outside of the cap-
tain and the officers knew of the fire.
The steamer carries a cargo of about
9,000 tons, including a large quantity
of war material. It has aboard 721
persons, including 171 cabin and 250
steerage passengers. The rest of the
ship's company is made up of officers
and crew. There are 30 Americans
among the passengers.
Recent fires aboard ships leaving
this port for ports of the allies
strengthen the belief that the fire
aboard the Rochambeau may have
been caused by plotters.
ASSOCIATION TO VOTE ON
CHANGES IN CONSTITUTION
Every Member of Student Body Eli-
gible to Take Part in Proceed-
ings of Meeting
At a general meeting to be held this
afternoon at 4:30 o'clock in the philos-
ophy lecture room, 202 N. W., the Ora-
torical association will consider and
act upon amendments to the constitu-
tion looking to a revision in the old
method of holding Varsity debate try-
outs.
According to the system hitherto in
use, each society selected three men,
who then debated in two inter-depart-
mental debates, from each of which
one of the final teams was chosen.
One of the amendments offered pro-
vides for the plan first used in the
Mid-west tryouts last year, namely:
Each society selects six in society try-
outs, and from the resultant 24 the
final teams are chosen under the direc-
tion of the debating coaches.
The other amendment provides for
general campus tryouts, and is an al-
ternative to the first.
Every student of the university is
eligible to attend this meeting and take
part in its proceedings.
Martha Cook Building Elects Officers
The election of officers at the Mar-
tha Cook building has been completed
and stands as follows: President,

Emily- Sargent, '16, secretary, Floren-
tine Cook, '17, and treasurer, Alice
Kraft' 18. In addition to these officers
the following go to make up the ad-
visory board: Grace Thomasma,
senior member; Golda Ginsburg, junior
member; Mabel Hall, sophomore mem-
ber, and Evangaline Lewis, freshman
member, Mabel Hall, sophomore mem-
her, and Evangiline Lewis, freshman
member.
General house meetings are held
every Wednesday evening directly af-
ter dinner, at which all business is
brought up.
Postpone Craftsman Society Meeting
Harry Parker, '16L, president of the
Craftsman society, has postponed the
meetingscheduled for Saturday night
until November 20, since the former
date conflicts with that for the lecture
to be given in the Hill auditorium by
ex-President William H. Taft.

SENATE DECLARES FOR COMPULSORY
MILITARY TRAINING AMONG UNDER
CLASSES STARTING WITH YEAR 1916

Union Totals in
Leading Cities
Detroit .... ....... . . $160,150
Chicago ...............58,985
New York ..............27,900
Minneapolis ............ 25,450
Ann Arbor ..............20,546
Cincinnati ..............8,410
Toledo.........8,150
Lansing................6,693
Kansas City6.........6,605
Los Angeles ............6,400
Cleveland ..............6,211
Bay City ............... 6,050
Milwaukee ..............5,080
Boston .................. .4,450
Saginaw ...............4,345
Philadelphia ............3,529
Grand Haven........... 3,410
Alpena ............ ....3,400
Pittsburg ...............3,350
Port Huron ............3,000
Seattle ................. 2,775
Rochester..............2,300
GREAT BRITAIN USING
AMEICA-BUILT PLANES
Curtiss Factory Said to be Turning
Out 12 Air Dreadnoughts
Per Day
New York, Nov. 8.-American-built
aeroplanes of the Curtiss type, which,
in the opipion of experts, could easily
cross the Atlantic ocean in a ilngle
flight, are being used by Great Britain
for the protection of her war and mer-
chant ships. So amazingly have the
Americans developed the ability to
meet the demands of the European
conflict that the transatlantic flight
regarded as a risky experiment when
projected by Lieut. John Cyril Porte
last year could -now be accomplished
with comparative ease.
Lieut. Porte's oversea flier, the
America, has been succeeded by the
super-America, a third larger, with en-
gines developing 120 more horse-
power. Economy has been developed
to such an extent that the original flier
would hold no comparison to the pres-
ent model.
According to Henry Woodhouse, one
of the governors of the Aero Club of
America, the Curtiss factories in Buf-
falo are turning out 12 of these dread-
noughts every day and the Canadian
branch at Toronto is producing five
daily. All these are being shipped in
parts to England and are being as-
sembled there.
Fresh Glee Club Planned for Future
Plans for the, formation of a Glee
club and a Mandolin club modeled af-
ter those of the Varsity were proposed
at a meeting of the 1919 literary class
yesterday. A committee has been ap-
pointed to draw up plans and will re-
port at the next meeting.
WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
Chrysanthemum exhibit, Memorial
hall, 2:00 to 5:00 o'clock.
Dr. Ward speaks, "Y" meeting, U-Hall,
6:30 o'clock.
Women's mass meeting, Barbour gym,
3:30 o'clock.
1919 lits smoker, Michigan Union,
7:30 o'clock.

Engineering society meeting, society
rooms, 7:00 o'clock.
Reserved seats for Taft at Wahr's all
day.
TOMORROW
Vesper services, Newberry hall, 5:00
o'clock.
Alpha Nu meeting, Alpha Nu rooms,
7:30 o'clock.
Tryouts for Adelphi Central league
preliminaries, Adelphi rooms, 7:30
o'clock.
Preliminary tryouts for Comedy club
cast, 205 N. W., 7:30 o'clock. t

REQUIRED OF ALL FIRST AND
SECOND YEAR MALE
STUDENTS
REQUIRES_3 HOURS
No Credit Will be Given Except to
Commissioned Officers of
Corps
QUESTION TO GO TO REGENTS

STUDENTS TO DEFRAY COST
UNIFORMS, ESTIMATED
AT $14

OF

The senate of the university, at a
meeting held last evening, considered
the question of introducing military
training into the university and voted
to transmit to the regents of the uni-
versity for their consideration the fol-
lowing: ,
1. General Statement. Beginning
with the academic year 19916-'17, com-
pulsory military training shall be in-
troduced into the university.
2. Amount of Compulsory Training.
The compulsory military training shall
be equivalent to three one-hour pe-
riods weekly.
3. Of Whom Required. Compulsory
military training as above described
shall apply to all first and second year
male students of university colleges,
viz.: The College of Literature, Sci-
ence and the Arts; the Colleges of En-
gineering and Architecture; the Col-
lege of Pharmacy, and the College of
Dental Surgery, except as exemptions
are made in the following section.
4. Exemptions. Exemptions from
the requirements of military training,
as above stated, shall include: (a)
Students over 25 years of age at the
time of entering the university; (b)
students who enter the university with
junior or more advanced standing; (c)
students who have had two years of
military training at some institution
at which a United States army officer
was on duty as professor of military
science; (d) aliens who do not intend
to become American citizens; and (e)
students physically disqualified. In
case physical disabilities are claimed
as a ground for exemption, a petition
made out in proper form is to be certi-
fied by the executive head of the health
service of the university and submitted
through the military office.
5. Voluntary Military Training. The
courses in military training shall be
elective for students other than those
specified in the above section, and, ex-
cept for commissioned officers of the
corps, shall be without credit.
6. Federal Aid. Under federal laws
the immediate direction of military
training shall be in the hands of a pro-
fessor of military science, who shall
also be commandant of cadets and a
commissioned officer of the United
States army, detailed by the war de-
partment for the purpose; this officer
to be assisted by a retired non-com-
missioned officer of the United States
army, and, if permitted by the war
department, by additional commis-
sioned officers. The larger control of
the courses in military training shall
be vested in a committee on military
training of the university senate, to
consist of the president of the uni-
versity, one member of each of the
several colleges in which military
training is compulsory, and the pro-
fessor of military science.
7. Assistant Instructors in Military
Science. As many assistant instructors
in military science as are deemed nec-
essary shall be selected from the field
officers and captains of the cadet corps
upon the recommendation of the pro-
fessor of military science and approval
by the committee on military training.
All commissioned officers shall be re-
quired to take additional classroom in-
struction in military science equiva-
(Continued on Page Six)

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Ad W. Riter says :-
It is just as important that
you advertise, no matter how
large or small your business, as
it is that you show'displays in
your show windows.
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