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November 07, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-07

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$2.50
NEWS OF THEWORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

The

Mich gan

Dail

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN
PRICE FIVE CENT

- --- -------

VOL XXVI. No. 30.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1915.

-- 1

NISH'S FALLOPENS
ROADFROM BERLIN
TO TURK CAPITOl
SERBS RETREAT INTO MOUNTAINS
AFTER LOSS OF LOWLAND
ST RONG(HOLW
KITOHENER OFF TO BAKAN
War Lod's A bsence lxplained Af'te
Sestion is crete. hiM
Lodon
Sofia, Nov. 6.-Nish has fallen to th
Dular invaders, and th railway from
Constantinople to Berlin is at las
open cn its entire length to the us
cf the Teuton allies. A Bulgarian di-
vision of troops now occupies the
former prvisional capital of Serbia.
Serbians are retreating into their
muntain fastnesses, after losing in
rapid succession practically all their
strongholds on the Danube plains and
in the Balkan foothills. Practically
two-thirds of Serbian territory is now
under foreign flags. The forts around
Nish and other towns are practically
obliterated by the heavy fire from Bul-
garian guns.
Every house in Nish, according to
reports, was transformed into afort
and street fighting raged with enor-
mous bloodshed.
WAR MINISTER IS IN BALKANS
London, Nov. 6.-An official state-
ment has been issued today explaining
that the absence of Lord Kitchener,
British minister of war, is due to a
visit to the Balkans. Lord Kitchener
disappeared rather suddenly from
England today, causing intense excite-
ment here.
The war minister has been closeted
with Premier Asquith in several con-
ferences recently, and last night he
visited King George V, who is still
weak from his accident at the western
front. Premier Asquith is now assum-
ing charge of the British war office.
The official statement announces
that the war earl is absent "temporari-
ly on a public duty." It is firmly be-
lieved in London circles, however, that
Lord Kitchener will take active com-
niand of allied troops in the eastern
war countries. This act of the minister
is the culmination of several trips
about Great Britain and western Eu-
rope during the 'past several months.
Absolute denial has been made of
rumors on the continent that Lord
Kitchener had resigned from his posi-
tion. On the contrary, it is believed
that he will inspect conditions and
probably assume command in the Bal-
kans and possibly at Gallipoli or in
Egypt, where he began his military
fame by the recovery of the Sudan for
the British.
Premier Asquith has been once be-
fore in charge of the British war de-
partment, for a short time after the
resignation of Colonel Seeley, during
the Irish home rule troubles.
Half. Million Spent for German Plots
New York, Nov. 6.-At least $500,-
000 has been expended in carrying out
alleged German plots in this country
in an effort to prevent war munitions
from reaching the allies, according to
a statement made by one of the offi-
cials investigating the cases of Rob-
ert Fay, who claimed to be a German
army lieutenant, and five alleged ac-
complices.

Federal authorities admitted that
they considered the lengthy story
which Fay told concerning his life his-
tory and activities in connection with
plots against steamships carrying
munitions from this country to the
allies. Fay, it was said, is now be-
lieved to be a Hungarian, whose real
name is Feji.
Federal agents are now trying to
trace the sourceofathe large amount of
money, said to have been spent by dif-
ferent men in attempting to carry out
the various bomb plots.
Large Crowds Attend "Mum" Exhibit
Crowds of people attended the an-
nual chrysanthemum exhibit at Alumni
Memorial hall yesterday. Before . the
game the hall was filled with.crowds
of people admiring the lacy flowers,
the plants seeming larger and more
perfect than last year. The "mums"
will be on exhibit today from 2:00 to
5:00 o'clock.

j Barrett Naking Second Touchdown for Cornell J

CORNELL TEAM DOWNS VARSITY FOR
ITS THIRD DEFEAT IN SUCCESSION;
BIG RED DECLARED BEST IN AMERI

FOOTBALL SCORES
Harvard 10, Princeton 6.
Brown 3, Yale 0.
Dartmouth 7, Pennsy 3.
Notre Dame 7, West Point 0.
Pittsburg 19, y,'. & T1. 0.
Syracuse 73,,a. Unii 0.
Chicago 35, Vask:11 Indians 0.
DEAD; INJURED 2IN
BROOKLYN FACTORY FIRE

Drill

Inefficient Escapes and Lack of
Blamed for the Horrible
Disaster

FACLYMEN TO CANVASS
INSTRUCTORS FOR UNIONI

Villa Threatens
jAmerican firms

Campaigners
ate's

to Use University
Endorsement in
Campaign

Sel.

Leader Demands $25,000 from
Companies Operating in
Mexico

FourI

"Realizing the importance of
such an organization as the Mich-
igan Union in helping to promote
the general welfare of the stu-
dent body, and realizing the ab-
solute necessity for a new and
nbach- larger home for the Union,
in order that it may work effi-
ciently and accomplish the ends
desired, the senate of the Uni-
versity of Michigan does hereby
endorse the Union movement,
and asks the aid of the alumni I
in the effort of the officers of the
Union to obtain funds with which
to build, equip and maintain the
proposed new building."
Supporting their endorsement in
March, 1911, of the movement for a'

Naco, Sonora, Nov. 6.-That General
Villa is in an ugly mood toward Amer-
icans is evident by the threat he has
made against American citizens and
property in Mexico. It developed to-
day that he has demanded $25,000 each
from the Phelps company of New York,
the Nacozari Copper company and the
Montezuma Copper company, and from
the Elltigre Copper company, owned
by Kansas City people.
The Canangea Consolidated Copper
company, another American company,
has already paid $25,000 for the pro-
tection of its Canangea property and
in addition has surrendered its hos-
pital for Villa's wounded and given. a
large quantity of supplies.
Obregon to Pursue VilA's Troops
Douglas, Nov. 6.-General Obregon
has arriv ed with Carranzista remnfnr.P

E S. JOH NS WARD TO TALK
ATl"Y"U-HLLMEETINS
Former Director ofTurkish Red Cross
to Tell of the Dardanelles
Campaign
+Dr. E. St. Johns Ward, formerly one
of the directors of the Turkish Red
Cross, has been secured to speak at
the second of the "Y" U-Hall meetings
at 6:30 o'clock tonight.
While his subject has *not yet been
announced, it is likely that he will
speak on some phase of his work while
connected with the Turkish troops in
the Dardanelles six months ago.
During his eight years in the near
east Dr. Ward shared the confidence
and esteem of the highest Turkish of-

' Iuaall% UWU1 UI1z1GbUrnorce-
new Union clabhouse, a coiirittee of ments at Agua Prieta today, and he
faculty men will carry on a oampaign will assume an aggressive offensive
among the teaching staffs of the uni- against General Villa. Obregon ar-
versity this week. The work will be rived at the recently besieged city in

New York, Nov. 6.-Tlve persons,
at least eight of them girls, have per-
ished in one of the most horrible fire
disasters in the country's history,
in a blaze following an explosion in
the Diamond Candy company's build-
ing in Brooklyn.
Of the 300 or 400 women and girls
employed in the candy and adjacent
box factories, 68 are known to be in-
jured, and some reports gave the
death list at 20. The suddenness of
the combustion and the inefficiency of
fire escapes and lacked training in fire
drill were causes of the disaster. The
whole building is said to have been
wrapped in flames within five minutes
after the explosion on the third or
fourth floor of the factory.
The women and girls began to jump
from windows before the fire depart-
ments' nets were stretched beneath
them. Several bodies are beyond allI
recognition.
Scores of the injured have been+
rushed to the Williamsburg hospital.,
The candy factory was a wooden1
structure and caved in within 15 or
20 minutes after the fire began in
earnest.+
500 WOMEN ATTEND RECEPTIONt
Presidents Angell and Hutchins Amongr
Speakers .at Women's League I
The annual reception given by the
Women's league Friday night in Sarah1
Caswell Angell hall was attended byt
more than 500 of the university women.t
There were short speeches by Pres-
ident-Emeritus James B. Angell, Pres-t
ident Harry B. Hutchins, Mrs. Delphinet
Ashbaugh, president of the Michigan1
State Federation of Women's Clubs,
and Helen Humphreys, '16, president1
of the Women's league.t
"Go home and help your community,"
urged Mrs. Ashbaugh, "Make thet
world a better place because you have
lived here."t
Dr. Angell, whose wie was one of
the organizers of the league, told of
the needs of a large body of women.
Helen Humphreys gave a brief ac-
count of the celebration of Vassar's
fiftieth anniversary, to which she was
a delegate.
Following the entertainment there
was dancing in the parlors of the gym-
nasium, after which refreshments were
served. The reception marked the
opening of the social season of the
league. Next Friday the first weekly
informal party will be held in Bar-
bour gymnasium.
t
Revolt or War, Greek Dilemma
London, Nov. 6.-King Constantine
of Greece has stated unofficially that
into the general European war. De-
itno the general European war. De-
spite the custom of turning over the
government leadership to the party
with a parliamentary majority, the
kinginsists on retaining the minority
leader, Zaimis, as premier.
Zaimis is head of the "neutralty
party," which favors absolute impar-
tiality to both sides in the present con-
flict. His opponent, Venizelos, leads
the war and pro-entente faction.

WOLVERINES OUTPLAY VISITORS
ONLY DURING SHORT
PERIOD
FINAL SCORE 34 T0 7
Barrett, Shiverick and Collins Star
for Ithacans; Cornell Line
Impregnable
PLAY IN MICHIGAN TERRITORY
"PAT" SMITH AND "MAULIE" PLAY
STELLAR GAMES FOR THE
MAIZE AND BLUE
And thus Michigan sorrowfully
chronicles her third successive foot-
ball defeat of the season.
Those big red fellows from Cornell
proved irresistible, running up the
convincing total of 34 points, as
against Michigan's more modest ap-
portionment of 7.
At no time during the game was the
result in doubt. Cornell had probably
the best football team in America, bar-
ring none. For a brief period during
the second half the Maize and Blue
outplayed the Ithacans, but it was of
no avail. Cornell simply took a sec-
ond breath and began anew.
The principal offenders in the Itha-
can lineup from a spectacular point
of view were this highly-touted Barrett
and Shiverick. Of course there was
Collins, too. But he didn't count so
much. He only ran 45 yards for a
touchdown in addition to pleading
guilty to several other minor offenses
of a less serious nature, but at the
same time it was the two first men-
tioned individuals that played particu-
lar havoc with Michigan's aspirations.
In justice to the others, however, let
it be recorded that the attempt to
credit any select few with an advan-
tage is positively criminal libel to
those who go unmentioned.
That Cornell line could have held
until the sun went down, apparently.
Shelton and Eckley, the two ends, both
acted as though they were more or
less familiar with the game. At least
these lads indicated that they'd seen
the contest played before, or else had
listened to some pretty lucid explana-
tions and interpretations of the rules,
for they did about everything that the
law allows.
During the early part of the secoid
half the Michigan team plunged into
the game with fight written in every
action. This does not intend to imply
that they hadn't been scrapping be-
fore, but everyone simply let loose to
the limit, and even Cornell couldn't
stop them, which is probably the last
word in commendation for a team's
offense. The play was all on Cornell's
side of the 50-yard line and when Nie-
mann recovered a fumble on 'the 32-
yard line nothing could check "Pat"
Smith and "Maulie." With the ball
within a foot of the line, "Rummy"
Roehm dove between "Wally's" legs
and slid over for a touchdown before
(Continued on Page Four)

done in co-operation with the nation-
wide campaign and the faculty com-
mittee will be an integral part of the
Ann Arbor building fund committee.
The chairman at the head of thej
committee has not yet been announced,
but a university professor interested
in the work gave out some of the de-
tails of the campaign yesterday.
"There are now 507 faculty men list-
ed on the faculties of the university,"
he said. "Of these, 138 are life mem-
bers of the Union. There ought to be
at least 450 of them in the faculty, and
we expect to enroll no less than this
number in the course of our campaign.
The committee will go on the theory
that every assistant professor, instruc-
tor and assistant should hold a life
membership amounting to $50. Also
that every professor, in addition to
holding a life membership, should give
from $50 to $250. We ought to raise
$10.000 over and above the life mem-
berships, and these should total $20,-
000. The committee will approach
every member of the faculty, whether
he is already a life member or not.
There will be a general chairman and
from 16 to 18 sub-committees."
England Suppresses London Globe
London, Nov. 6.-The British govern-
ment today duppressed the London
Globe, the most independent and out-
spoken journal in the isles. This is
the first stringent act of this character
to which the British government has
resorted since the war's outbreak.
France May Regulate Food Troubles
Paris, Nov. 6.-The new cabinet un-
der Premier Briand has decided to
present a bill in the French chamber
to authorize town officials to fix max-
imum and minimum food prices to re-
lieve food scarcity hardships.

a special train, together with his en-
tire staff of -officers. He expects to
drive Villa out of Sonora shortly.-
TAFT BRANDS DOCTRINE UNSAFE
Speaker Criticizes Roosevelt's Use ofj
Executive Power
New York, Nov. 6.-Broadening the
use of executive power as exercised by
former President Theodore Roosevelt
was termed as "unsafe doctrine" by
former President William Howard
Taft in an address here last night. He
was speaking to the subject, "The
Presidency: Its Power, Duty, Respon-
sibilities, and Limitations," when he
uttered the criticism of certain acts of
his predecessor in the White House.
"Mr, Roosevelt," he said, "in his
notes for a possible autobiography
says in regard to certain acts of his
administration, 'I did not usurp power
but I did greatly broaden the use of
the executive power.'
"My own judgment is that it is an
unsafe doctrine and that it might lead
to irremediable injustice to private
rights. The mainspring of such a view
is that the executive is to play the part
of a universal Providence and set all
things right. The president is not an
omnipotent and benevolent prophet."

Dr. Ward of-Syria, and former
head of the Turkish Red Cross,
who speaks at the "Y" U-Hall
meeting at 6:30 o'clock tonight.
ficials in a peculiartway. Jemal Pasha,
the Turkish minister of marine, and
now the dictator of Palestine and
Syria, took a special interest in the
American Red Cross, and he with his
staff was entertained on many occa-
sions at the field quarters of the hos-
pital.
At Constantinople Dr. Ward met
Enver Pasha, the commander-in-chief
of the Turkish army, and also Talaat
Bey, the minister of the interior, and
his acquaintance with these men gave
him an insight into the affairs of Tur-
key which has probably not even been
exceeded by the American ambassador
himself.
According to Dr. Ward, the neutral-
(Continued on Page Six.)

* Ad W. Righter says:-
* The advertising manager of a
* trust company in Philadelphia
* is applying the same psychology
* to a bank that for years has
* been applied to mercantile insti-
* tutions.
* He has had a set of plans and
* specifications made to remodle
* the show windows with a view
* of installing very thick plate
* glass behind which the bank can
* safelynexhibit itswares: coin,
* currency, government bonds
* and other securities of known
* value.
* He, proposes to have this
* guarded by officers both within
* and without the bank, to sug-
* gest its value.
* This is nothing more nor less
* than exhibiting the goods in
* which they deal, as is true in
* the case of every merchant on
* the street. In a word it is Ad=
* vertising.
S* * * * * * * * * * *

I I

1*i

FIRST

METHODIST CHURCH

1

State and Washington Sta.
A. W. STAL KER, D. D., Pastor
Morning Subject: "NATURE'S GREATEST PARABLE"
Evening Subject: IBSEN'S "GHOSTS"
Quartette: Ada Grace Johnson, Alice Bliton. Odra Patton, Stanley Wilson

WHAT'S GOING ON

l

sI
TODAY
Chrysanthemum exhibit, Memorial
hall, 2:00 to 5:00 o'clock.
Dr. Ward speaks, "Y" meeting, U-Hall,
6:30 o'clock.'

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