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November 06, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-06

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THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF 'i1E WORLD AND
TTHE CAMPUS

The

1C II1 1

IWO
Daily

P'hones :--Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPII SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 29.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

____________________ -I__________________________________ "

EVE OF BiG FRAY
FINDSIARSITY IN
FIGHTING -SPIRIT
IMITATION SCRIDIAGE AGAINST
S('I'RS~ ShOWS COIINELL'S
PET PLAYS
SMITH AND REIMANN TO START
"Wile lie ston, harry Hammond, Be-
skdes Other Grid Stars, A ppear
to ,Ti"tcli Fiual Practice

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* * * * * * * * * * *
NIclignCornell
Beno (18). L. E. Shelton (168)
Watson (1Y8) L. T. .Gillies (192)
Reimann
(186)......L. G. . Miller (203)
Nieinann
(165).......C. Cool (160)

Cochran
(223, Capt.) R. C.
Norton (210). it. 'r.

Staatz (172).
Roehm (168).

R. E.
Q. B.

-Anderson
(205)
Jameson
(198)
.Eckley (157)
.Barrett (183,
Capt.)
.Collins (146)
Shiverick
(166)

Maulbetsch
(153).....L.H.
Catiett (162). ii, H.

Smith (192).. F. B. Mueller (186)
Referee--H. B. Hackett (Army).
Umpire-J. C. Holderness (Le-
high).
Field Judge--Walter Eckersall
(Chicago).
Head Linesman--C. B. Obeson
(Lehigh).
Game called at 2:00 o'clock.

To Michian Men
By Ring W. Lardner
1 have a message for you,
A message of good cheer-
I have not picked a winner
In any game this year.
I haven't picked a winner
In games of any sort;
In football or parchesi,
Or any other sport.
Then banish Gloom, you rooters,
And substitute a grin-
For in today's sweet pastime
live picked Cornell to win.
ALUMNI SPIRIT IS
STRONGFOR 1BAND
I. of M. Club of Philadelphia Requests
Privilege of Quartering
Organization
RESERVATIONS ON TRAIN OPEN
Further evidences of enthusiasm
among Philadelphia alumni over the
Penn-Michigan game on next Satur-
day came into the, band office yester-
day in the form of a telegram to S. J.
Hoexter, faculty manager of the musi-
ciaus. It read:
"The U. of M. club of Philadelphia
request it as a courtesy that the band
be lodged at the Hotel Walton, the
Michigan headquarters. The club will
pay for the rooms. Wire care U. S.
Mint. T. L. Comparettis."
This means that the Quaker City
alumni are doing all in their power to
make their reception to the visitors a
cordial one, and it only rests with the
Michigan supporters to make the
game a success from the enthusiasm
standpoint.
Wednesday night's Band-Cer-Tain-
ment was a success from the financial
standpoint, as approximately $700 had
been turned in up to last night. It is
imperative, however, that those ticket
sellers who have not yet reported, do
so at once. The band office in the en-
gineering shops building is open for
reports every afternoon.
Reservations in the special train
that is to go to Philadelphia Thursday
afternoon may be made at the Michi-
gan Union or the Bond street store,
any day up to the time the train
leaves. Any surplus made on the trip
is to be rebated. The rate has been
fixed at $28.25, a lower berth costing
$7.00 and an upper berth $5.00. Those
who wish may double up in the berths.
This train will carry the rooters and
the band, the Varsity leaving Wed-
nesday, and the scrubs Friday.
CONDITION EXAMS TO BE HELI)
FOR DENT STUDENTS FRIDAY
A written examination for the re-
moval of conditions in Materia Medica
will be held in the dental amphitheater
from 10 to 12 o'clock Friday morning,
November 12. All seniors who are
conditioned in this subject are to take
the examination.
TAFT ADVOCATES PREPAREDNESS
Thinks There is no Danger of America
Becoming Militaristic
Boston, Mass., Nov. 5.-Reasonable
preparedness was advocated by former
President William Howard Taft in a
speech made here today. He says that

he is no pacificist, but that the nation
should not be left helpless.
"The nation should be in a position
to command justice from other coun-
tries. We should not be put in a posi-
tion where other powers can take any
advantage. There is no danger of
America succumbing to militarism, be-
cause the spirit of the nation is en-
tirely opposed to that sort of prepared-
ness.

ACCMULTE fPEP'
AT MASSMEETING
Prominent Alumni Inspire Old Spirit
of Fight in Rooters Present at
Last Yell-Fest
COACH YOST GIVES SHORT TALK
Snap and ginger stuck out all over
the big mass meeting for the Cornell
game last night in Hill auditorium.
It was the last yellfest of the football
season, and each one of the speakers
aimed directly at getting the team and
the student body keyed up for today's
battle with the Ithacans.
Three speakers were on the pro-
grain : Judge James 0. Murfin, '95-
'96L; Judge George P. Codd, '91, and
George McMahon, '16. Coach Field-
ing H. Yost also gave a short talk
after the meeting had officially closed.
Judge Murfin, always a favorite at
Michigan mass meetings, was cheered
lustily when he got to the heart of
the situation as regards Michigan's
previous defeats this season. "At both
the M. A. C. and Syracuse games," he
said, "I offered the alibi that 'Michi-
gan can't win every game! But, by
heck," he continued, "we can't lose
them all either."
The speaker for the alumni, many
of which occupied a reserved section
near the stage, was Judge Codd. His
viewpoint was that good sportsman-
ship was as essential as victory to
the athletic reputation of the univer-
sity.
George McMahon, '16, the student
speaker, tried to show that Cornell's
football team is not as strong as it is
touted to be. He said that the only
real victory that the Red and White
has won, the Harvard game, was se-
cured by sheer luck. Michigan's All-
Fresh team would stand a good chance
of beating Cornell, he claimed, giving
comparative scores of the All-Ftesh-
Heidelberg, Heidelberg-Oberlin, and
Oberlin-Cornell games to prove his
point.
Coach Yost, who talked for a few
minutes after the singing of the "Yel-
low and Blue," said that victory today
would depend largely upon the spirit
of fight which the team and rooters
show at the game.
University women, who were to
have been featured in the rooting,
were somehow lost in the fracas, and
were not given an opportunity, as wo-
men, to show what they could do in
the way of real noise.
(Continued on Page Six)
NAVY USES WIRELESS TELEPHONE
Secretary Daniels Sends First Message
to Test Wireless Telephone
for Use In Navy
Washington, Nov. 5.-Secretary Dan-
iels today sent the first naval order
by wireless telephone. The test
was for the purpose of demonstrating
the practicability of wireless telephony
for the navy, both in times of peace
and war. It was carried on by the
companies interested.
The message was sent to Rear Ad-
miral Usher and was as follows: "Re-

DOCTRS REPORTED
SLAIN STILL ALIVE
Mea Whom Vilb Claimed Killed by
Carranza Shell Are Prisoners
of Chieftaip
OBREGON COMES TO AGUA PRIETA
Naco, Arizona, Nov. 5.-Dr. H. R.
Thicher and Dr. James Miller and the
two chauffeurs who were reported
killed yesterday in the battle of Agua
Prieta are alive and well in Cananea,
the prisoners of Villa there.
Dr. H. C. Wickman, who was a pris-
oner of the chieftain, and who reached
the border today, claims to have seen
the men. George Shaw a truck driver
who took supplies to the Villa forces,
and who returned to Naco today, said
that he saw the men alive last night.
Officials of the Cananea Consolidated
Copper company took the matter up
with Villa and he assured them that
the men were alive. He said that he
had made a mistake in reporting them
dead. It is thought that he attempted
to arouse the sentiments of the Amer-
ican people against Carranza and his
government by stating that four United
States citizens had been killed by Car-
ranza shrapnel. The four men who
were killed were teamsters who had
joined Villa of their own free will.
Villa left Naco today for Cananea.
From there he expects to proceed to
the Pacific coast towns of Sonora to
open a campaign. Carranza forces are
being rushed to attempt to overwhelm
the men who will follow Villa.
General Obregon, commander-in-
chief of the Carranza armies, is ex-
pected in Agua Prieta tomorrow to
take charge of the forces concentrated
there and to continue the campaign
against the remnants of Villa's army.
FOUR HUNDRED COUPLES PLAN
T1 DANCE IN COMBINED GYMS
Contingous Music Will be Feature of
Huge Cornell Game Ball;
Alumni Welcome
Indications are that the Cornell
game dance to be given tonight in
the combined gymnasiums by the
Michigan Union will be one of the most
festive social events of the year. Al-
ready over 350 tickets have been sold
and many will probably be purchased
tomorrow. This assures an attendance
of at least 400 couples.
The feature of the occasion will be
continuous music. Two eight-piece
"Ike" Fisher orchestras, one situated
in Barber gymnasium, the other in
Waterman gym, will produce the mu-
sic. They will play alternately, one
starting immediately the other stops,
thus supplying incessant music and
thereby satisfying the most strenuous
terpsichorean enthusiasts.
Four hundred couples will trip the
light fantastic from 8:30 to 12:00
o'clock, being refreshed at intervals
from bowls of delicious Hawaiian
punch. Michigan alumni will be most
welcome at the party.
Prof. and Mrs. Frank H. Stevens and
Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur R. Humphreys
will be the chaperons for the evening.

Sings of Michigan
in Heroicntnzas
Just as the war is producing war
poetry, so the present football season
is causing the addition of poetic effort
on the part of many budding poets. In
a recent number of the Yale Daily
News, the following poem by Grant-
land Rice, appeared, showing that al-
though many years ago our rivals of-
ten refused to recognize our superior-
ity in football, now as they look back
they must acknowledge that in the
days of 1901-1905 Michigan was the
regular cock of the walk.
"I remember the stand at Thermopylae
The Greek Guard made one day;
I remember the legions that Caesar
used
To shatter the Gallic sway;
And I remember across the years,
Two banners that crowned the crest,
When Yale was king of the conquered
east
And Michigan ruled the west.
At night in my humble den I dream
Of the glories that used to be-
Of Hannibal taking the Alpine trail,
O Drake on the open sea.
And then I wander the ancient ways
To a dream that I love best,
When Yale was king of the conquered
east
And Michigan ruled the west."
And just an additional word--when
the next trip is made, back in the ar-
chives of football history, some men-
tion is going to be hade of That
Michigan Band and That Michigan
Spirit, and the cmeback in '15 that
started th'e Yost men on another vic-
torious march to victory.
PASSENGER STEAM E AFIRE AN)
GROUNDED ON DANGEROUS COAST
Rear Admiral Winslow Goes to the
Rescue with Flagship San
Diego
Los Angees, Cal., Nov. 5.-With 61
passengers and a crew of , 1on bnrd,
the steamer Fort Brock, headed for
San Francisco from Guaymar, is
ashore and afire on the coast of Lower
California near San Jose Beleago.
This message was received by wire-
less from Rear Admiral Winslow, of
the flagship San Diego. The captain
of the Fort Brock got in touch with
Admiral Winslow, saying that he need-
ed assistance as soon as possible and
that fire was raging on board.
The situation is doubly serious in
that a heavy sea is running and there
is danger that the boat may go to
pieces. The point at which the ship
is aground is one of the most danger-
ous on the southern coast because it
is practically impossible to effect a
landing.
Delta Sigma Rho Holds Business Meet
Members of Delta Sigma Rho, hon-
orary debating society, will meet at
5:00 o'clock Monday. Important busi-
ness is to be discussed and a full at-
tendance at the Union is expected.
WHAT'S GOING ONI
TODAY
Cornell vs. Michigan, Ferry field, 2:00
o'clock.
Class football, south Ferry field, 10:00
o'clock.
Senior engineers vs. soph engi-
neers.
Fresh laws vs. senior laws.
Band meets at Memorial hall, 1:15
o'clock.

Prof. J. C. Parker speaks, room 348
engineering building, 7:00 o'clock.
Cornell game dance, Waterman and
Barbour gyms, 9:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Chrysanthemum exhibit,' Memorial
hall, 2:00 to 5:00 o'clock.
Dr. Ward speaks, "Y" meeting, U-Hall,
6:30 o'clock.,

SPUTIN BRITISH
CAINT PPEARS
'TO BE IMMINENT

Bill1251 TRANSPOlT
lNDIAN TROOPS
SUNK

CARRYING
Is

AIR BATTLES OCCUR AT FRONT
zaIifns Refuses Place in Cabinet Which
King Costantie of Greece
Offers
London, Nov. 5.--Rumors of further
disruption in the British government
were rampant today, due to the ab-
sence of Minister of War Lord Kitch-
ener.
It is stated in official sources that
Kitchener's absence is purely of a
temporary character, but nevertheless
c rumors have been flying thick and
fast concerning his resignation. The
official report further states that he is
away on public business in pursuance
of his duty.
Lord Kitchener has had a hearing in
the recent past with King George, who
is still suffering from injuries received
in his fall last week.
Zaimis Refuses Cabinet Post
London, Nov. 5.-King Constantine,
of Greece, has offered a post in the
new cabinet to former Premier Zaimis,
who with his ministers resigned yes-
terday. Zaimis refused, saying that he
wished to take no active part in inter-
nal politics.
Five Battles Fought in Skies
London, Nov. 5.--Five battles in the
air were staged on the British front
today. One German aeroplane was
brought to earth within the British
i nes, according to a statement issued
by Sir John French,
Turks Take Offensive at Angae
London, Nov. 5.--The Turks took the
offensive in the Dardanelles campaign
on November 4 at; Angac. All attacks
were repulsed by the allies.
German U-Boat Sunk
Amsterdam, Nov. 5.-A German sub-
marine has been sunk off Varna, the
Bulgarian Black sea port.
Transport Lost in Aegean Sea
Ikondon, Nov. 5.-According to an
admiralty report today, the British
transport Ramasam was torpedoed by
a German submarine in the Aegean
sea about a month and a half ago. The
report says that 316 Indian troops lost
their lives when the boat went down.
GUESTS CROWD UNION AT FIRST
IF' SRIRES OF FISHER PARTIES
To music furnished by Fisher's first
orchestra of Kalamazoo, about 100
couples danced from 9:00 to 2:00
o'clock last night at the Union. The
dining-rooms were opened and refresh-
ments were served. This is the first
of a series of Fisher parties, and those
who attended pronounced it a success
from every standpoint.

Coach Yost concluded preparations
for the Cornell game yesterday after-
noon, staging an imitation scriunmage,
which was followed 'by a signal drill.
The coach tconducted the scrubs out
onto the Varsity's sacred domains and
had the-, run through the different
Cornell formations. No tackling was
allowed, as the exhibition was merely
for the edification of the Varsity squad,
which seeracd to experience consider-
(Continued on Page Six)
BREAK BETWEEN WILSON
AND BRYAN IRREPARABLE
Chief Executh e Shows Friendliness
Toward Tamnmany Contingent
on Recent Visit
New York, Nov. 5.--That the break
between President Wilson and former
Secretary of State W. J. Bryan has
become beyond repaih is the opinion
advanced by close friends of both mn
after observirg the events of the last
few days in New York.
Bryan bndcd the presient a note
just as the executive was leaving the
St. Regis tetay. Although the by-
stander: :ticed that WIlson read the
note -ri great ca, he made no com-
ment The pr :±ee ;ts upporters be-
lieve that the differences in opinion on
both national and international poli-
cies will be made an issue of the Dem-
ocratic national convention in 1916.
Tbis does not. w orry the president,
say his friends, due to their belief that
at least nine-tcntbs of the prople are
behind Wilson and whatever Bryan
may, do will not afect the president's
chane1s in the least.
President Ph'lip J. Britton of the
Manhattan club was inclined to laugh
at the stateme t Mr. Bryan made in
ing as a "fea.t of the Mammon-wor-
(Continued on Page Six)

port as soon as possible on arrival in The dance committee has been ap-
New York." By means of wireless and pointed as follows: John S. Leonard,
overland telegraph Usher acknowl- '16L, chairman; E. C. Maquire, '16;
edged receipt of the order and prom- W. E. Lamoreau, '16L; F. S. Baer, '16;
ised to obey it. L. C. Heustis, '17P; W.' R. Atlas, '18.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION STS.
Sunday, th November, 10:30am.
Opportunity will be given a t t h e morning service
for Presbyterian Students to unite with
the church by affiliation
University Bible Classes At Noon

* * * * * * * * * * *
AD. W. Righter says, in behalf
of THE ADIVERTISER' CLUB:
It is with the greatest of
planre that we welcome you
IU'sts of the University of
Michigan, to the city of ANN
ARBOR. 'There is only one
ANN ARBOR." It is Yours.
We open our doors to You. Stay
as long as You like. Enjoy it
while you may, and if you must
go-COME AGAIN
* * * * * * * * * * *

I

i.

*

i

__

E i

®

FERRY

FIELD

CORN E LL

vs.

SIC H I'GA

ates Open at 12:00 M.

Game Called at 2:00 P. M.

Student Coupon No. 10 ex- General Admission, $1.00 Reserved Seats, $2.00 Coupon No. 10 good for ger
changed for reserved seats eral admission only at Ferr
up to 12:00 Noon. A Few $3.00 Boxes field.

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