100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 05, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DAILY
$2.50 I
NEWS OF TAE WORLID AND
TLICE CAMPUS

e
t
. f-;a

Ich

s
: psi
.:.Gs'

Phones:--Editorial 2411
Business 960
TEIEI'lA I SERVICE BY TIE
EW YORK SUN

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

VOL. XXII. No. 28.

., ___ _ . .

_._... . ._._ - _ i

JUDGESGOOD AND
MURFIN ADDRESS
ROOTERSTONIGHT
JOSEPH FEE TO BE CIAHIgNp
OF THE CORNELL MASS
MEETING
"BILL" DAY MAY LEAD CHEERS

Men Secure Tickets at UMon at
O'Clock; Women Get Cards
at University Hall
*
* Facts of Tonight's Mass Meeting
* Time--7:30 o'clock. Doors open
* 7:10 o'clock.
* Place-Hill auditorium.
* Chairman-Joseph Fee, '17L.
* Speakers-James O. Murfin, '95-
96L; George P. Codd, '91;
* George McMahon, '16; and
* probably William L. Day, 'OOL,
* and Victor Pattengil, '11.
* Music by the Varsity band.
* Cheerleaders-"Hal" Smith, '16,
* and "Bob" Bennett,' 18.
*

4)D
*
*;
*,
f
*.
*;
*
s:
*
*:
*

Judge George P. Codd, '91, of De-
troit, will be an additional speaker at
the Cornell mass meeting tonight in
Hill auditoriujn. Judge Codd is a for-
mer mayor of Detroit, having held of-
fice during 1905 and 1906. He was
also a regent of the university in 1910
and 1911.
The list of speakers for the meeting,
including Judge Codd, is now composed
of Judge James O. Murfin, '95-'96L,
and George McMahon, '16. Joseph Fee,
'17L, is to be the chairman. "Big Bill"
Day, '00L, and "Vic" Pattengil, '11,
who also have been asked to talk at
the meeting, have not yet been heard
from, but it is almost certain that Day
at least will come to Ann Arbor for
the meeting.
Andrew J. Green, Jr., of Detroit, a
Michigan rooter, although a Cornell
graduate, had been invited to talk,
along with Day and Pattengil, but he
telegraphed last night that he could
not attend the meeting. The Varsity
band has been scheduled to play.
The tickets for the meeting, which
is to be the last of the football season,
will be given out today. Although the
committee in charge of the last mass
meeting received a number of com-
plaints from upper-classmen because
freshmen were being given an equal
chance to secure seats, the committee
in charge hopes to be able to seat the
men tonight so that the most enthusi-
astic will be on the lower floor, re-
gardless of class. Tickets for men will
be given out, beginning at 10:00 o'clock
this morning, at the desk in the Union
clubhouse. The women of the univer-
sity may secure admission cards from
10:30 to 12:00 o'clock and from 1:30
to 3:00 o'clock in the women's roon
in University hall.
SEVEN ALUIMNI FOR-N COMMITTEE
Professor A. F. Bursley, '99, Appointed
Chairmtan
Seven alumni of the university have
been chosen by a mail vote of the local
committees as a permanent Michigan
Union building committee. Prof. Jo-
seph A. Bursley, '99, is chairman of
this committee, and Homer L. Heath,
'07, is secretary. The other members
are: iRoy D. Chapin, '01; Henry W.
Douglas, '90E; W. D. McKenzie, '96;
Prof. Henry E. Riggs, '10; Gardner S.
Williams, '89.

'Victors' Brings
Sleep To'1a)'Jfr.
AI-Iresh ltael I-I es NMrtad Strain
of1' higan Field oig to
Future Warrior
Prentiss Po Douglass, Jr., has
beos; . K 'i'd as the name of the latest
arch a to the All-resh squad. "Dug,"
Sr., is still wearing that smile which
is characteristic of him when his team
wins or when a promising member is
added to his collection of yearlings,
and predicts that the names of Willie
Heston and JImmy Craig will be for--
gotten when the youngster dons the
moleskins. And listen! When it's
time for the nine-pounder to go to1
sleep, the coach of the All-Fresh can
be seen gently one-stepping around,
baby in arms, humming the martial
strains of the "Victors."
TWO AMEICNOTORS
KILLED WHILE TENDING
WUNDSOF VILLSA
1)r. R. H. T1hiehter and Dr. John Miller1
Are Struck by Carranzista
Shrapnel1
G EEAL ILLA'9S COHORTS
IETR ATFROM AGUA PRI E TA
"I DO NOT INTEND TO THROW
OVER THIIE FIGHT," SAYS
LEADER
Douglas, Ariz., Nov. 4.-Two Amer-
ican doctors and their two chauffeurs
were killed instantly today by Carran-,
zista shrapnel while they were dress-
ing the wounds of Villa soldiers. Dr.1
R. H. Thichter, a prominent man in,
Cananea and at his home town, Bis-
bee, Ariz., and Dr. John Miller were
the Americans killed on their nission
of mercy to the Mexican ranks.
Both doctors were surgeons in the1
Cananea Consolidated company ho:-
pital staff, Dr. Thichter being chief
surgeon. They had just finished giv-
ing supplies to wounded Villistas when
a shower of shrapnel from the Agua
Prieta garrison burst over them. The
four died instantly, and the wounded
soldiers near then] were blown to
atoms during the explosion.
The reports have been confirmed by
incessant rumors on the American side,
and finally by the bringing of the bod-
ies to Naco for interment. The disas-
trous mission was entirely philan-
thropic.
Generad Villa Retreats
El Paso, Texas, Nov. 4.-General
Villa, at the head of his dwindling and
retreating cohorts of several thousand
)Iexicans and Yaquis, is being harassed
by the Carranzista garrison from Agua
Prieta, which is now being reinforced
by troops rushed in from the south.
Villa appeared near Naco today, which
Carranza's general, Talles, is prepar-
lug to assault. Villa still holds stra-
tegic towns in Sonora in direct com-
munication with coast towns.
In spite of persistent reports flitting
across the American border that Villa
has lost Chihuahua, he gave out a
fairly optimistic report. He strongly
affirmed his rights to the supreme con--
miand in Mexico, relying on the author-
ity of the recent convention at Agua
Calientes.
"Furthermore, I support my troops
to the finish," stated Villa, "with suf-
ficient food and munitions. I do not

intend to throw over the fight."
Wilsonf lans to See Army-Navy Battle
Annapolis, Md., No'. 4.-President
Wilson has indicated his intention of
viewing the annual football game be-
tween West Point and Annapolis at the
Polo grounds in New York, November
27. He has asked that arrangements
be made for a party of eight.

COUNCIL DECIDES
A rhimN Wr PHUE

fl0flllI i VLLUUIVIL
PT s for Receplion of Cornell Team
and RIo ters Found Not
Feasible
NIDHT GYM CLASS IS CONSIDERED
Plans for the official welcome of the
Cornell team and accompanying band
of rooters were abandoned by the stu-
dent council at its meeting last even-
ing. It was shown that the rooters
will not arrive on any special train,
but will rather stop en route and come
into Ann Arbor at different times. The
Big Red team will stop Dff in Detroit,
where they will practice at the Coun-
try club, not coming to Ann Arbor till
just before the game, when they will
go direct to the clubhouse from the
railroad station.
A committee was appointed by Pres-
ientYT. P. Soddy, '16E, to investigate
into the feasibility of having the gym-
nasium open in the evenings, in order
to accommodate the students who are
compelled to spend their afternoons in
the laboratories. If it is found that a
sufficient number would take advan-
tage of the opportunity, an effort will
be made to obtain the necessary sanc-
tion for nightly gym work.
The council took action on the case
of H. E. Ramsey, '17E, who was in-
jured in the spring contests last May.
A committee was appointed to look
into the matter and to make a detailed
report at the next meeting.
A new student council member was
swvorn in at the meeting. He is E. T.
Olson, '16P, who was elected by his
class this fall.
Contrary to the general campus idea,
the meetings of the student council are
open to the public, and it is the wish
of the council that as many as are in-
terested should attend these meetings.
They are held at 7:15 o'clock every
other 'Thursday evening in room 105
N. W.

RECEPTION AWAITS
MICHIGANROOTERS
Philaedelphi Alniumni Will Greet Team
and Undergraduate Followers
in Qu aker City
JA('KIES WILL LEARN CHEERS
On to Pennsy!
Student rooters and the band are to
leave Ann Arbor for their crusade
against the east Thursday night on a'
special train over the Pennsylvania
railroad, arriving at Philadelphia Fri-
day afternoon at about 3:00 o'clock.
There they will fall into a veritable
hornets' nest of enthusiasm, from the
signs of energy among Quaker City
alumni that are coming to Ann Arbor
daily.
The notable mass meeting that pre-
ceded the Harvard game last fall at
the Copley Plaza will be duplicated
on Friday night, when Philadelphia
alumni gather in the banquet rosin of
the Walton hotel to greet the Michigan
team and rooters. Every effort is be-
ing made by the alumni association
to give the visitors a real reception,
even to the extent of decorating por-
tions of the Walton, that has been se-1
lected as the Michigan headquarters
for the trip, with Maize and Blue.
The Jackies of the battleship Mich-
igan, stationed at the naval yard near
Philadelphia, have completed arrange-
ments to attend the gane in a body.
Their ship's band, composed of 16
pieces, will lead them onto the field,
playing the Michigan songs that it has
been practicing for the occasion. The
sea fighters have been devoting their
spare time for the last few days re-,
hearsing the Wolverine yells, so that
they will be able to join in with the
others from "down on the farm."
Definite rates for the trip on the
special train have not yeen been fixed.
The price will range between $35.25
and $33.25 for the round trip, includ-
ing berth, with a pcssibility of a re-
duction of this sum, however. No
profits will be derived from the trip.
ligo 'Wagonseil, '14, E. Rodgers Syl-
vester, '17, H(enry Rummel, '14-'161,
and E. W. H-aislip, '12-'14L, will give
information as to making reservations
and details of the trip. The place
which these men are to make their
headquarters will be announced later.
AMERICAAN NOTE TO BRITAIN
ON TRADE ARRIVES IN LONDON
,ansing's Message on Seizure of United
States' Vessels is Framed
in Caustic Terns
Washington, - Nov. 4.--The note of
the United States to Great Britain pro-
testing against British interference
with the neutral trade reached London
today, and will be presented to the
British foreign office tomorrow. It is
probable that the note will be made
public both in the United States and
Great Britain next Monday morning.
A copy of the note will be sent to
the French embassy tomorrow simul-
taneously with the delivery of the note

Red TeamLevet.
Withlullopiig PR-LIES rARTY
Sent Westto hay Agi nst
OIITRNFTRIS

Ithaca, Nov. 4.-Cre i l <<hav'no
alibis to present if she falls betore
Yost's Wolverines at Ann Arbor Sat-
urday. The squad whici star( for
Detroit tonight is th- : ongest team
which ever left Iihme'. cry man is
in perfect shape to 7 u ' the Iardest
battle of his career.
A tremendoa S , at as gin the
Big Red team upon is depar re a
confidence was supreme amon both
players and followers of the elvn.
Not oply is a victory expectwd 1,or
Sharpe's men, but it is the general
impression that the score wifl he de-
cisive.I
ETERPE FIRE[NDCAE
ANOTHER MNIID )'N"PLOT
BritishI Freighter .i u n
Y ork Harbor x lode+ a'i
Huri s
New York, Nov. 4. Folio dx 4g the

So'ndo Nov. 4. -The Greek "nen-
trality cabinet has resigned and the
pro-cut nte war party under Venize-
los has returned to power. The war
a rty won iN a vote on a compromise
day, tt esuls of the voting being
Etente authorities are practically
certain that the reorganized Greek
government will take immediate ac-
iea against the Teutonic allies in the
lalas.
uinania is expected to act soon, and
probably in favor of the allies, but it
is apparently vacillating because of
approimately 200,000 Bulgarians sup-
posed to be intrenched near the west-

I hi 111115 and toA§1iif,. U.o- ,nioAT) cm t lioI~

oumns a11" lt~. n R:an an harder, anld about half
British freighter "Euterpe" in the New as many Tcrs waiting farther south
York harbor this morning, fedeal ani and east, also near the Rumanian
state officials are busy sifting evidence. border.

1E E F. A'LsAE I E
I)FETEI)
BRITISH STEAMER F/ARTY SUNK
n iut 'm .ake F Strong Stand
inist Russians, T ireaten-
-igyL 1vi

Authorities stage that a miuch broader
and deeper plot is being unsealed than
that in which Robert '1ay was impli-
cated last week.
A central grand ju ry is now forming
to question witnesses, from whom it is
expected to collect the details of a plot
to hinder all munitions and supplies

rN ..---The army of Field
NkiarshAl Von il idenburg took a strong
stnddin >hast 24. hours and
marcheti r ini overw-1helmning force over
RusIa n I enes into the former Teu-
. poiti9 aout ' 2Emiles from
1)isk. they have also captured
Mikiliski, thus: practically obliterating

for the Efittnte allies, and espeib su:ee c by the Russians in yester-
for the hindrance of automobile shi;ip- day's struggles.

** * * * * * * * * *
aWli'l't'" IS ONE OF THE
iI'1 CII IlElI-LEA DElIS
MiCI(' AN EVER HAD
Celina, 0., Nov. 5, 1915.
Editor The Michigan Daily:
Tell the rooters I'll be at the
mass meeting and Saturday's
game to put some old-time pep
in the yells and help win that
game.
As ever yours,
"WHITEY" OTIS.
* * * * * * *' * * * *

*
*
*

New 16-Inch Gu on Way to Panama
Boston, Nov. 4.--The army 16-inch
gun for the defense of Panama canal,
which is capable of firing a projectile
21 miles, left the arsenal today and
proceeded on its way on two specially
constructed cars mounted on 14 trucks.
APPOINTMENTC 1 MiT TE E MEETS
Prospective Teachers to Register on
Monday in University hall
The formal enrollment with the

ments.
Testimony is already at hand to
o show the alleged violation of
neutrality by Teuton officials in this
country, and some of the New York
statutes also have been violated. Some
of the witnesses will thus be 91ige
to undergo both federal and state in-
quiries.
The fire on the "Euterpe" started
immediately after the loading was
completed. The flames broke out sim-
ultaneously throughout the sluip's
cargo of sugar, and then occurred the
terrific explosion.
The officers believe that a bomb
among the sugar bags was the cause
of the explosion. About the same time
a $50,000 cotton fire broke out in a
warehouse of the New York Dock com-
pany. At least 18 secret arrests were
made in New York today.
WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
Jeffersonian society meets, Jeff(Json-
ian hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Webster, society meets, Webster hall,.
7:30 o'clock.
Mass meeting, Hill auditorium, 7 :30
o'clock.
Fischer party, Michigan Union, 9:00
o'clock.
Tickets for mass meeting for ien at
Union, 10:00 o'clock.
Tickets for mass meeting for women
at U hall, 10:30 to 12:00 o'clock and
1:30 to 3:00 o'clock.
TOMORRIOW
Cornell vs. Michigan, Ferry filld, 2:00
o'clock.
Cornell game dance, Waterman and
Barbour gyms, 9:00 o'clock.
Class football, south Ferry field, 10:00
o'clock:
Senior engineers vs. soph engi-
neers.
Fresh laws vs. senior laws.

' ighltig near Riga seems to remain
about the same, with only slight ac-
tihn on either side.
lint h4 Steamer Sunk
Leaden, Nov. 4. -The British steam-
r "Fiarty," of 1,500 tonnage, has been
sunk A party i ;ive survivors has
landed.
Ser ians ld Bilgars
Salonila, ;ia Paris, Nov. 4.-Up until
yesterday the Sertitans after a hard
two days' battle were still holding the
?31lgarian.s in check near Bauna,
nortua st of Prilet (about 25 miles
nortueast of Monaster in southern
Serbia).
Fierce Trench Fighting in West
Paris, Nov. 4.-In a continuation of
tihe -atle of yesterday in the vicinity
of Talamit, in the Massigen of the
('otpeigne district, Germans were
drh-iven out from the French trenches
hi. theyhad occupied earlier in the
In a renewal of the attack today the
Germans succeeded in gaining a new
foothold on the French line. The Teu-
ions mde repeated attacks at Lacour-
tine, but were driven off.
01! NT VON BUE LOW TRAVELS
TP 11iT , idA D FOR QUIET
Luzerne, Nov. 4.--Count Von Buelow,
former German chancellor, came to
Switzerland "as a private person, and
not to talk, peace or politics." He
stated today to a newspaper corre-
spondent: "The war must be fought
out, and Germany has every resource
at hand. She is especially strong in
the spirit of unity, and will continue
the war to its conclusion by arms."

teachers' appointment committee of by Ambassador Page to the British.
the university will take place at 4:00 This act is largely a result of a re-
o'clock Monday, November 8, in Uni- quest on the part of the French, who

versity hall. This meeting is of ,the
utmost importance to all persons who
wish the services of the committee
next spring. The meeting will last
approximately one hour.
The registration is open to any per-
son who is a member of the university
-graduate students, seniors, under-
graduates and members of the various
professional schools. A rule of the
board of regents provides that regis-
tration at the time designated shall
be free, but that a fee of $1.00 will be
charged for late registration.

have agreed to be governed by the
same admiralty rules as are the Eng-
lish in regard to seizure and detention
of cargoes or ships belonging to neu-
trals.
A few sharp passages are included
in Secretary of State Lansing's note,
especially in reference to the recent
detention of several American vessels
in British ports. Sir Edward Grey in-
timates that the offense which these
passages may afford can be met by
diplomatic solution, possibly in the
hands of an international commission.

*
*
*
*
*

* * * * * i * * * * *
Ad. W. Righter says:-e
Advertising is psychological
s uggesti9n.
* * * * * * * * * * *

*
*
*
*
*x

,,

C
Todays
15TH

SELL AME ISSUE OF oon
yy
E GARGOYLE" 6
SPECIALLY MADE TO BE READ BETWEEN HALVES
ON SALE ON THE CAMPUS AND NEWS STANDS
S15c A -Tday

aI

I

Noon

a

M15C

1 I_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan