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November 04, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-04

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THE DAILY
$2.50
N EW OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

Awd

The

4
AiL u Ark

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXII. No. 27.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TI!S O NOVMBR 4, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

_________________- --. I

VILLA DRIVEN TO.
RETREAT THROUGH
REBEL GENERAL QUITS AQUA
PJ. tIE TA, LEAVING 400
DEAD ON FIELD
FORCES LEAVE IN CONFUSION
General Farrmon Killed While Car-
ranza Artillery Makes Terrific
Onslaught
Douglas, Ariz., Nov. 3.-'-Hunger and
thirst have again proed themselves
conquerors, over arms, the latest vic-
I im of t eir ravages being Villa and
us army attacking Agua Prieta.
Because he was unable to obtain
fccd and water for his men and be-
caus, ammunitions were denied him
on account of the embargo, Villa to-
day retreated toward the south from
which he came. He left over 400 dead
or the deserted battle field before
Agua Prieta.
The losses of the Carranza garrison
have been estimated at 29 dear and 7
wounded.
Whether the retreat was ordered by
Villa, or whether his men left of their
own will in search of food, is not
known. Considerable ammunition
found in one of the trenches formerly
occupied by a Villaista battery shows
the haste which was used in retiring,
One field piece was left b# Villa be-
cause the animals which drew it had
been killed by an explosion from a
Carranza gun.
Officers of the United States army
express surprise at the action of
Villa, because the chieftain is said to
have asserted that he would take the
town of Agua Prieta or sacrifice his
entire army in the attempt. A de-
serter of the Villa forces who arrived
in Douglas today said that Villa was
forced to quit by the threatened de-
sertion in a body of all his troops.
The former Villa soldier claims that
most of the men are ready to join the
Carranza forces or surrender to the
United States. There are no other
roads open to them.
Just before the retreat, the army of
Villa was pounded by a terrific artil-
lery fire from the Carranza forces.
General Rafael Farrmon, formerly of
the Zapata staff, and recently a mem-
ber of Villa's force, was killed in the
battle. It is not known if other offi-
cers were killed. The death of Farr-
mon has been confirmed.
Washington, Nov. 3.-Major-General
Funston's request for the authority to
cross the Mexican border at Douglas,
if necessary, was submitted to Presi-
dent Wilson by Secretary of War Gar-
rison today. The indications late to-
night were that it would remain at
the White House until approved. The
war department published today a list
of casualties as a result of the firing
across the border in the battle of
Agua Prieta. Seven soldiers were
wounded, one of whom has since died.
WOOLSACK INITIATES 11 MEN
Dein Bates and Professor Aigler Greet
New Members to J-Law Society
Dean Henry. M. Bates and Prof.

Ralph W. Aigler, of the Law school,
spoke at the initiation banquet given
at the Union last night by Woolsack,
junior law honorary society.
The eleven men who were initiated
last night are as follows: D. F. Smith,
S. D. Frankel, H. F. Korn, W. L. Owen,
N. B. Kelly, H. J. Connine, R. E. Glea-
son. G. C. Classen, K. Barnard, Hamp-
ton Wall and B. G. Cameron.

Lack Of Food In
(Germany Critical
London Sees Governmental Regulation
of Supplies as Showing Alarm-
ing State
London, Nov. 3.-Although it is not
true that Germany is starving, the food
crisis has reached an alarming state.
One necessity of life after another
is being put under government regu-
lation. The newspapers throughout
Germany have been devoting many col-
umns of space to this new terror. One
whole pagek of the Frankfurt Zeitung
is devoted to nothing but a discussion
of the imperial food laws and regula-
tions.
The edict includes about 12 items.
Among them is one in regard to the
regulation of the supply of bread, one
regarding the consumption of fish and
game, and another dealing with the
restrictions put upon the consumption
of meats and fats.
RIOT FOLLOWS ATTEMPT TO
BREAK WILKESBARRE STRIKE
John Shalman at Point of Death, While
Another Scab Gets Fractured
Skull
Wilkesbarre, Pa., Nov. 3.-Riot pre-
vailed unchecked in Wilkesbarre today
as a result of the first attempt of the
Wilkesbarre Railway company to op-
erate its lines since the calling of a
strike three weeks ago.
One strike-breaker, John Shalman,
of New York, is dying in a local hos-
pital. Another, William N. Enright, is
suffering from a fractured skull. A
score of other imported workers, many
police and special officers were treated
for minor wounds in hospitals today.
Many of the cars which ventured forth
were totally wrecked by the mob.
PLAYERS PERHFORM
TO CROWDE" OS
"Let's Go, Michigan," Entertainment
Staged for Penn Trip
Funds

ga l ILTR WOMEN ROOTERS
WILL TAKE LEAD A T
IN0 T AlRANGE
'ThAT FAIR ONES MAY SHOW
VOCAL POWERS
JOSEPH H, FEE TO PRESIDE
George lie41lahon aid Ju'dge 3urfin
to Represent Students and
Faculty
University women, the women that
earned a place as Michigan rooters at
the first "come-back" mass meeting 10
days ago, are to be the headliners at
a "pep-fest" for the Cornell game Fri-
day night in Hill auditorium.
Although a plan to secure a woman
cheer-leader for the meeting was un-
successful, Varsity Leader "Hal"
Smith, '16, is arranging a part of the
cheering program so that the women
can show what they have to offer as
Michigan rooters. At the other mass
meeting 730 seats were filled with wo-
men rooters, but 900 places are to be
reserved for their use Friday because
it is believed that that many will be
necessary to accommodate them.
Joseph Fee, '17L, will be the chair-
man of the meeting; George McMahon,
'16, will be the student speaker, and
Judge James O. Murfin, '95-'96L, of
Detroit, will be one of the alumni
speakers. Judge Murfin is an alumni
member of the board in control of ath-
letics of the university.
Judge William L. Day, '00L, famil-

i - I

English Approve
Asquith 's Speech
Tu,?;eralded as Mos ,omentow'
Since Heglnlinl g of .on
TLondon, Nov. 3. -Premier Asquith's
speech in parliament yesterday hasj
made a most excellent impression on
both the government and the public,
although it failed to completely satisfy
the critics.
His speech is heralded as the most
momentous of the war. In the opinion
of a member of parliament. "The pre-
mier's speech thrilled the house."
It is agreed that the Asquith state-
ment contains two main features, the
creation of a war council and the
agreement upon a common policy by
France and Great Britain. His de-
fense of the Dardanelles situation was
not altogether satisfactory.
Despite criticism, the government is
stronger nowv than ever. In the opin-
ion of the house, the premier is with-
out equal either in or without the cab-
inet. He has been proved equal to
almost insurmountable tasks. His
statement favoring compulsory ser-
vice, if necessary, was no surprise.
To introduce New Credit Vote
London, Nov. 3.-Another vote of
credit will be introduced into the
house of commons next week. Al-
though reports do not mention the
amoant, it is thought it will be in the
neighborhood of 250,000,000 pounds
($1,200,000,000).
Alpha Ni to Consider Military Drill
Aloha Nu is to meet at 7:30 o'clock
tonight on the fourth floor of Uni-
versity hall. "Resolved, That military
drill should be established for students
at the CUniversity of Michigan," will

iarly known to tie campus as "Big be discussed.
Bill," and "Vic" Pattengil, '11, a mem-
ber of the 1910 Varsity football team, ' r i t
Judge Murfn acide'''ahon, although
their engagement is not definite. "Big'
Bill" Day was chosen as the Union's
"movie cheer-leader" for the clubhouse ,
campaign, and may consent to go
through some of his antics at the com-
ing meeting.
The Varsity band will play a num-
her of selections, and "Bob" Bennett, ('r©s Ile
'18, will assist Smith in leading the
cheering. The mass meeting will
start at 7:30 o'clock. M WI

Y 0 SPEAKER
ii if Pams lear as Red
ad in Tiurkish War
'enter
TI UT S. AMBASSADOR

CAMERA AN TO SNP
MEMBR OF UNION Tt
CLUH SE THIS NOONI
Plhotoegraph to n lude Also Other
Students and Faculy Mni of
University
GROD T TO BE BROKEN FOR
THE TOTAL SUBSCRIPTIONS NOW
HOVER AROUND $600,000
FCRE
Michigan undergraduates will have
a golden opportunity today to display
their interest and willingness to co-
operate with the thousands of alumni
who are conducting a nation-wide
campaign to build them a new Mich-
igan Union clubhouse.
At 12:05 o'clock this afternoon
Union members and all other students
enrolled in the university and all men-
hers of the faculty will assemble at
the clubhouse for a picture.
The pictare will be taken by two
campus photographers, and will be
sent to every one of the 206 local com-
mittees, to be used in the final month
of the campaign. They will publish
the photograph to show the utter in-
adequacy of the present Union build-
ing as a clubhouse for the 5,000 men
students of the university, and is ex-
pected to speak much louder than col-
umns of rhetoric. To make the pic-
ture successful a large majority of the
students and faculty men wil have to
turn out and include themselves in the
photograph.
Returns from the Union's national
building campaign are coming in
steadily and the grand total now hov-
ers around the $600,000 mark. Thisl
is the sum set as the minimum with
which actual work on the new million-
dollar home will be begun, and withl
this much of the total desired already1
in the hands of tha campaign comm'
tee in the form of definite pledges,
grouid will be broken early in the
spring.
The support of the 206 local com-
mittees has been unanipous in the ex-I
tension of the national campaign for
another month. Chairmen from all1
over the country reported that they
had been unable to cover their terri-
tory properly in the 30 days originally
allotted to the canvass. With the addi-
tion of another month to the time orig-
inally allowed, practically every alum-
nus, former student and faculty man1
in the university will be approachedt
by a Union committeeman in the in-
terests of the new Union home. 1
Various changes in the organization
of the local committees have now been
made in an effort to make the final
month of the campaign as thorough as
possible.
LWHAT'S GOIG ONt
TODAY<
Exhibition of manuscripts, Memorial
hall, 8:00 a. m. to 10:00 p. m.
Michigan Union membership picture,
clubhouse, 12:05 o'clock.
Senior architects' meeting, room 301,t
new engineering building, 5:00
o'clock.
Faculty concert, Hill auditorium, 4:15a
o'clock.1
1918 lit meeting, 101 economics build-
ing, 4:00 o'clock.
Alpha Nu meeting, fourth floor, U-Hall,

7:30 o'clock.
General Deutscher Verein meeting of
all sections, Deutscher Verein'
rooms, 8:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Jeffersonian society meets, Jefferson-
ian hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Webster society meets, Webster hall,
7:30 o'clock.
Fischer party, Michigan Union, 9:00
o'clock.

VON HINDENBURS
HAS TO RETREAT
FROM_-POSITIONS,
STRING OF SUCCESSES HALTS
WITH IICHECKING OF DVINSK
MARCH

ENGLAND TRAPS SUBMARINE
German Vessel Sunk in Baltic Sea;
Serbs and Bulgars Continue
Fierce Struggle
London, Nov. 3.-Field Marshal von
Hindenburg's recent successes in the
western theater of the war have come
to a sudden stop. He has been com-
pelled to withdraw from Sweson and
Ilsen on the northern end of the line.
These reports have been confirmed by
Berlin.
This results in his abandoning the
attack from the west and southwest
on Dvinsk, and will probably cause
some change in the German plans for
a renewed offensive in the direction of
Riga.
Ilsen is 10 miles west of Dvinsk and
Sweson is 12 miles south of Ilsen.
Russia Warns Persia
Petrograd, Nov. 3.-Russia has told
Persia that the Anglo-Russian aid to
Per'sia would cease if the rumors that
Persia has made definite arrangements
and agreements with Turkey and Ger-
many prove true.
British Take U-Boat
Liverpool, Nov. 3.-The Daily Post
prints a report today that a German
super-submarine has been captured at
Stettin. The boat, which is 254 feet
long, carries two torpedoes and four
guns of fairly large caliber. The ship
was caught in a cleverly laid trap.
French Land Troops-
London, Nov. 3.-According to a re-
port received here from Sofia, more
French troops have been landed at
Saloniki. A French battleship is bom-
barding the Bulgarian coast in the
neighborhood of Saloniki. The fight-
ing between the Serbs and the Bul-
garians continues as fierce as ever.
Copenhagen, Nov. 3.-The German
steamer Degonia, of 1,477 tons, has
been sunk by a British submarine in
the Baltic sea.
REGENTS CONFER DEGREES AT
REGULAR NOVEMBER MEETING
R. W. Priest was appointed an as-
sistant in the College of Dental Sur-
gery at the board of regents' meeting
on Tuesday night. The degree of bach-
elor of chemical engineering was given
to George J. Chertoff, while Robert H.
Criswell was given a doctor of medi-
cine's degree in the Homeopathic Med-
ical school.
Thomas F. Murphy was granted a
LL.B. degree in the Law school, and
Alice Vandervelde was given an A. M.
in the Graduate school.
Nurses' degrees in the Medical
school were granted to the following
nurses who have taken and passed
their examinations after a three-year
course of training: Irene Wright,
Pearl Pottrouff, Rhea Gettings, An-
nette Fox and Ida T. Eiola.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* d. W. Righter says- *
* HISTORIES of successful en- *
* terprises throughout the country *
show that they have kept their *
* names continually before the *
* public. * *
* RESULTS have shown this to *
* be good business jujdgment. *
* * * * * '* * * * * * * *

NINE ACTS COMPRISE

PROGRAM

Melody and fun that would rival in
quality the productions of "big time"
vaudeville circuits was the offering at
the Varsity band's first "Let's Go,
Michigan," Band-Cer-Tainment in Hill
auditorium last night.
The band and its campus entertain-
ers played to a near capacity house.
Seven acts, in addition to the selec-
tions given by the band, were on the
program.
Frank Wheeler, '16E, Harold For-
sythe, '17, and H. L. Davis, '17, slated
as the "Serenaders' Trio," with violin-
cello, violin and guitar, were first on
the program, and together with Leon-
ard Aldrich, '17E, Karl Macomber, '14,
and Leroy Scanlon, '16L, made up the
second act, a "Serenaders' Sextet."
W. C. Achi, '17L, with a group of
Hawaiian players and singers, sang
"One, Two, Three, Four," "Sweet dei
Lehua," "On the Beach at Waikiki,"
and "Aloha Oe."
The Michigan Concert quartet put
on the fifth act on the program. Gro-
ver sang as a solo a special song, "My
Chinese Girl," by Abraham Gornetzky,
'17, and W. A. P. John, '16.
The band probably cleared the ex-
penses of its trip to Pennsy Nov. 13,
although the financial results of the
affair were not made known last night.
Hobart Guild to Meet Tonight
Hobart Guild will hold a meeting
and informal party at 7:30 o'clock to-
night in Harris hall. All members
and those Episcopal students wishing
to join are urged to be present.

RED TEAM IS STRONGER1
THN IN FORMER YEARS
Sharpe Puts ea 'ihrough Hard )rill,
as Michilgan Does not Look
Easy to Rim
Ithaca, N. Y., Nov. 3.-In the opinion
of critics, the Cornell Varsity which
leaves tomorrow night for Ann Arbor
to meet Michigan on Saturday is at
least 25 per cent stronger than any
other Red team that has ever gone
west to meet the Wolverines.I
Coach Sharpe put his men through
a hard scrimmage today, contrary to
the belief that he would ease up on
the men this week. It is easily to beI
seen that Sharpe does not regard the
Michigan team lightly and believes
that they will put up a fight. Sharpe
was an interested spectator at the
Michigan-Syracuse game last week.
It was announced tonight that 25
men: would be taken on the trip to
Ann Arbor. Those in addition to the
regulars who will go are: Eyerson,
Vander, Snyder, Killey, McKeat, Wells,
Jewell, Brown, Gainey, Scheckley,
Schlichter, Kaufman, Benedict, Lewis
and Kleinert.
Commerce Club iMeeting Postponed
Because it conflicted with the Band-
Cer-Tainment, the meeting of the Com-
merce club, scheduled for last night,
was postponed to next Wednesday.

Dr. Edwin St. John Ward, recently
returned from Turkey, where lie was
for six months director of the Amer-
ican Red Cross work for the wounded
Turkish soldiers, has been secured to
address the second U Hall "Y" meet-
ing next Sunday evening at 6:30
o'clock.
Dr. Ward went to Turkey more than
eight years ago, spending part of his
time as a medical missionary, and
while engaged in that work he had
many thrilling experiences. Once,
while in the Taurus mountains, he be-
came snow-bound for more than a
week, and was given up for lost by his
friends. He has also had varied ex-
periences arising from the fanaticism
of the Turks, Kurds and Arabs.
His intimate contact with the people
in his medical work gave him a pecu-
liar insight into the political, social
and religious questions which are so
shaking the foundations of the Turk-
ish empire.
During the past several years he
has been officially connected with the
Syrian Protestant college at Beirut,
Syria, in the capacity of professor of
surgery, and during that time lie has
come into.contact with many hundred
students from practically all of the
countries of the near east.
Dr. Ward, at the request of U. S.
Ambassador Morgenthau to Turkey,
was prevailed upon to go to Constanti-
nople to assume charge of a large Red
Cross station for the Turkish soldiers
who had fallen in the Dardanelles cam-
paign.

....

If

7 AD VAN
OFFICIAL

CE AL E
SOUVENIR

O

TUD

CRELL

P"ROGRAM

M Finest designed cover (4 colors) ever on any Souvenir Program. The only
way to know the Players-Names and Numbers of both Teams.
o SPECIAL FEATURE-- Every , score made in F o o ttbnatIi by Michigan from 1878
through the Syracuse Came of last Saturday, and the Grand Total for Michigan's History

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