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November 02, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-02

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THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUSI

1

ails

,Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

a

VOL. XXVII. No. 25. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1915 : PRICE FIVE CEN'

PLAN TO BEAUTIFY
CITY AND INCREASE
IT TWICEITS SIZE
University, Civic Association and the
Edison Company CO-
operate
ADDITIONAL DAMS TO PROVIDE
TWO NEW LAKES BELOW CITY
PROJECT INCLUDES EXTENSIVE
BOULEVARDS ALONG .
LAKES
An Ann Arbor of more than twice
the present size, with an extensively
worked out system of boulevards, and
with scientific design for proposed fac-
tory sites and general improvements,
is the idea that is being worked out
by Olmstead Bros. Co., of Boston, un-
der the auspices of the City Civic asso-
ciation, the university authorities and
the Eastern Michigan Edison company.
Last spring the experts from the
Boston concern were brought to Ann
Arbor and'since that time they have
been working on the proposed plan.
It is so extensive that it will take at
least two years to complete the plan
alone at a cost of $2,000.
Lake Drives Proposed
Besides the charting of all the land
of present within the city limits and
the suggestions in regard to building
that is to be carried on, extensive ar-
rngements are being made for devel-
oping the wonderful buiding sites and
wateraide driveways about the city.
The present boulevard will extend at
some future time up around Barton
pond as far as Foster's and down the
other side of the Huron river. Plans
and specifications are already out for
a new boulevard which is to extend
around the city, It is expected that
when these schemes are brought to
culmination an SO-mile drive-one of
the finest in this region-to Detroit
and return will be afforded.
Will Develop Estates
When the Eastern Edison company
completes the two new dams that are
proposed between here and Plymouth,
two lakes, one of them larger than the
present Barton pond, will be formed,
and this, In addition to the rapid
growth of Detroit and the beautiful
building sites on the hills surrounding
Ann Arbor, is expected to assure the
Immediate development of many large
estates in this vicinity. Already there
has been much talk of securing com-
muter rates and benefits, and it is
hoped that another such place as the
beautiful Bloomfield Hills will develop.
Will Suggest as to Architecture
It is understood that the designs will
include suggestions as to the scheme
of architecture which is to be employedt
in addition to the campus, and also in
regard to the method of enlarging the
present campus so as to make room
for the new buildings that are bound
to come in the future. Suggestionst
will also be prepared in regard to suit-
able building sites and architecture of
houses that are erected within Ann
Arbor proper.
Some idea of the scope of the project
can be gained from a realization that
whereas now there are about 23,000,
people in Ann Arbor, including the
students, the proposed provisions will
be for at least 50,000. The plan will
require at least 10 years to be brought
to a successful conclusion,
FRESHMEN WOMEN TO ATTEND
FIRST LECTURE ON "HYIENE"

Dr. Elsie S. Pratt, of the University
Health Service staff, will deliver her
first lecture on "Hygiene" to first
year women tomororrow afternoon in
Barbour gymnasium. All freshmenl
women are required to attend Dr.
Pratt's lecture in conjunction with<
their gymnasium work. There will1
he six lectures in all, one to be given1
each week.

MEXICANS SHOOT,
AMERICAN CITIZEN
IN BORDER BATTLE
L.1 . Taylor Killed When Villa Forces
Attack (Carranza lei at
Aqua Prieta
VILLA LEADS FORCES HIMSELF
AS FAR AS AflERICAN LINES
BORDER DWELLERS ALARMED
WHEN SHOWERS OF BULLETS
SING OVER THEIR HEADS
Douglas, Ariz., Nov. 1.-L. T. Tay-
lor, an American citizen, was shot
and seriously wounded in Aqua Prieta
today when Villa forces made an at-
tack upon the Carranza troops sta-
tioned there. Taylor had sought
refuge in the United States customs
office which was peppered with a
shower of bullets. While attempting
to escape from the building in a dash
for the cover of a nearby railroad em-
bankment he was shot, sustaining a
wound in his back.
Following the assault, Big.-General
Thomas E. Davis in command of the
United States troops just north of the
Mexican line, sent a message to Major
M. L. Harty to inform General Bantz
of the Villa forces to keep the fire
away from the American lines. Gen-
eral Bantz replied, giving his word
that more care would be taken. The
troops of Carranza defendng Aqua
Prieta are trying to prevent their fire
from going over the American lines.
However, bullets passed over the
men in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth
infantry.
The battle began a few minutes be-
fore 2:00 o'clock this afternoon when
Carranza fired on the Villa forces. A
few shots fired during the morning
were not heeded by the Carranza
forces. The Villa forces advanced on
the city and formed a circle about it.
Villa, himself at the head of his cav-
alry, advanced as far as the American
lines. The battle precipitated by Car-
ranza when he opened on Villa with
his field pieces as the line closed in.
The Villa cannon replied and the ar-
tillery duel continued during the af
ternoon,
Toward the close of the afternoon
machine guns were brought into ser-
vice. American observers state that
several of the Carranze shells ex-
ploded very close to the Villa army
Clouds of dust which arose from the
city indicate that several of the adobe
houses were hit by the shells. Villa
forces htate that they not more than
half a dozen wounded, owing to the
poor fire of the Carranza troops.
Shortly after the attack it was no-
ticed that several pieces of the Car-
ranza battery failed to reply, which
has led to the belief that they are
deserted. Villa shells fell in the close
vicinity ofgwhere it was known that
Carranze guns were located. The ac-
curacy of fire by those forces is rath-
er suprsing to United States officers
who are under the impression that
Villa is weak in trained artillery men
and has an inadequate supply of am-
munition.
50,000 Waiters to Strike in New York
New York, Nov. 1.-A strike of 50,-
000 waiters in the hotels and restau-

rants in New York is being planned by
local officials of the Hotel and Restau-
rant Employes' International alliance
and the Bartenders' . International
league. The strikers will have the
sympathy of the cooks and bartenders
of the city. Max Tilkewski, who has
been active in the interests of the
waiters in Cleveland, will be invited
to manage the enterprise.;

BAND'S PROGRAil
Of NINE FORSG
NE~lRDO 5TAG

Let 's Go, .Aieh-i-gan, to Pennsy

ALL ACTS BUT ONE TOE
"PEPPY" ?MUSICAL
VARIETY

OF

CAMPUS STABS HEALINERS
Serenaders' Trio, Sexte and Concert
Quartet to Help Send Band
to "Pensy"
Final weeding out processes result-
ed last night in the formulation of the
complete program for the "Let's Go,
Michigan," Band--Cer-Tainment to be
staged at 8:00 o'clock tomorrow nht
in Hill auditorium. Nine numbers, all
but one of the "peppy" musical variety,
will be included in the hour and a half
of harmony that is to send the musi-
cians half-way across the country to
"Help Wallup Pennsy."
In accordance with the spirit of the
football season, it is planned to make
the entertainment live and with as few
interruptions as possible. Details of
presented have been worked out so
that each number will follow imme-
diately on the heels of the last, there-
by eliminating any intermissions.
The Michigan Concert quartet is to
include H. L. Davis, '17, first tenor;
F. W. Grover, '17, second tenor; Chase
Sikes, '17, first bass, and Harry Carl-'
son, '17, second bass. Frank Taber,
'17, is to accompany the four musicians
on the piano. Grover is booked to sing
"My Chinese Girl," written by A. J.
Gornetzki, '18, and Waldemar A. John,
'16, especially for the occasion.
'Leroy Scanlon, '16L, will take part
as accompanist or the Serenaders' trio
and sextet, composed of Frank Wheel-
er, '16E; Harold Forsythe, '17; H. L.
Davis, '17; Leonard Aldrich, '17E, and
Karl Macomber, '14. String music
alone will be rendered by the sextet.
Seductive strains of a far-off land1
will be rendered by W. C. Achi's Ha-
waiian musicians, 10 in all. They will
sing three native songs, accompanied
by the ukulele. The nine men who are3
to appear with Achi are: Scott Wes-
terman, '17; P. A. Hartesveldt, '16L;t
C. P. Ritchie, '16; D. W. Sessions, '17L;1
C. C. Ashbaugh, '16; A. D Honey, '17D;'
W. F. Crockett, '16; J. L. Driscoll, '18L,
and C. H. Marshall, '16.
"Ten Minutes of Camp Davis," a mu-t
sical skit with an original setting, is1
to be presented by an aggregation of1
13 engineers, who will attempt to por-I
tray the life at their summer camp,t
leaving out the work and other inci-
dentals, The boilermakers who are toE
perform are: E. D. Bolton, '16E; F.t
K, Hrth, '16E; D. A. Thomas, '16E;
0. 0. Leininger, '16E; T. C. Hill, '17E;C
W. W. Dazell, '16E; B. Woodbury,
'16E; George Bleekman, '16E; E. E.t
Blomgren, '16E; R. T. Liddicoat, '16E;
R. W. Bame, '16E; A. H. Keeler, '16E,}
and W. B. James, '16E.'
E. 0. Snethen, '18L, is to give the
non-musical but laugh-inspiring num-
ber, namely, "The New England De-
bating Society." Snethen has alreadyt
made a name for himself as a profes-
sional reader and impersonator on va-
rious Chautauqua circuits throughout
the country. The management is con-
fident, in putting his name on -the pro-
gram, that it is placing before the cam-E
pus a coming Michigan entertainer.'
Following is the complete program:1
1. "The Victors," Ebel, '01; the
Varsity band.
2. "La Paloma," Serenaders' triol
and sextet.
3. Blue Danube Waltzes, Strauss;
the Varsity band.
4. (a) "One, Two, Three, Four," (b)i
"Sweet dei Lehua," (c) "On the Beach
at Waikiki," Hawaiian musicians. ,
5. "The New England Debating So-1
(Continued on Page Six)

The above 50 musicians are to pipe
the praises of the Maize and Blue oii
Soldiers' field Saturday afternoon,
when Yost's eleven meets the Penn
huskies. The Band-Cer-Tainment, to
be presented tomorrow night in Hill
auditorium, is to pave their way to

Pennsy with quarters. Yost said of
these men last Thursday night at the
"Enthusiasm" smoker, "You can't beat
that band, no matter where you go.
They have the punch and they seem
to help impart that quality to the team
when they strike up 'The Victors.'"

TEUTONS CAPTURE
SERBiAN ARSENAL
AT KRAGINEYATZ
NVADINO BULGARIAN FORCE NOW
BOMBARDS OUTPOSTS
OF NISH
VON HINDENBURG R EPELSRUSS
French Report Successes Over Rubl
garlaus at Autrili; Bulgar-
arians Still Hold City
London, Nov. 1.-Kraguievatz, where
Serbia's great arsen'al is located, has
fallen into the hands of the German
invaders, according to a report re-
ceived from Berlin today. In their
advance on the city the Teuton forces
irst captured Bilanopat, taking several
hundred Serbs prisoners.
The outer forts of Nish are now
under bombardment by the Bulgarians
who have advanced from Kinnacebate
and Nish. Yesterday the Bulgarians
made an attempt to drive the French
out of Kridolak on the Varden river
about 12 miles south of Istit. Three
attempts were made to take the town
by storm. The French replied by ar-
tillery in a cross-firfie, while the in-
fantry made use of a heavy rifle fire
on the front. At the sight of the firm
resistance the Bulgarians hesitated,
and the French, taking advantage of
the halt, rushed out and drove the
Bulgarians into Varden.
A report from, Delmonica says that
the French have succeeded in driving
the Bulgarians out of Kotchanit in the
district around Autrili. The city and
the railroad are still in the hands of
the Bulgarians. Autrili was captured
by the Bulgarians on October 24, *as
retaken by the French two days later,
but by a subsequent attack became the
possession of the Bulgarians, who still
hold it.

ADELARHBO 3 OSINEA
DIES AFTER OPERATION
AT HOSPITAL. ON SUNDAY
[Freshtlan Engineer Succumbs to At-
tack of Appendicitis Follow-
ing Brief Illness
FIRST DEATH IN STUDENT BODY
l)URPS'') l'SENT COLL EGE YEAR
PHYSICIANS STILL UNCERTAIN
AS TO REAL CAUSE
OF DEATH
Adelard B. Cousineau, '19E, who
was operated upon for acute gangren-
s appendicitis on October 24, died
at the lomeopathic hospital early
Sunday morning.
Cousi eau w as 10 years old and a
graduate of the Ispheming high schooly
at lsh ; nin, Mich. He had suffered
several atati s of appendicitis pre-
viousiy, but none had proved to be se-
rious.
On Friday afternoon, October 22,
Cousineau complained of being ill, but
paid little attention to his condition
which he did not consider at all se-
rious. Matters continued to grow
worse and on Sunday morning, Octo-
ber 24, he was forced to take to his
bed. A physician was called and the
patient was removed to the Homeo-
patbic hospital., where after a consul-
tation of several physicians, it was
found necessary to operate. The op-
eration was performed immediately
that afternoon by Dr. Hugh M. Beebe.
The exact cause of Cousineau's
death was a puzzle to the physicians
who attended him, but it is thought
that he fell victim to a general septi-
cemia. His body was taken to his
home in Ishpeming early Sunday
morning by a brother who had ar-
rived in Ann Arbor on Tuesday, Octo-
ber 26.
Cousineau's death was the first in
the student body for this -college year.
OLDEST EDITOR IN AMERICA
RECOVERS FROM OPERATION
Henry A. Reeves, '48--'51, the oldest
editor in the United States, has just
recovered from a major operation and
has returned to his office to continue
his work. Mr. Reeves is editor of The
Republican Watchman, of Greenport,
Long Island.
Denies Judge Lindsey's Jurisdiction
Denver, Nov. 1.-The juvenile court
under the direction of Judge Ben Lind-
say has been .denied the jurisdiction
of imposing #nes for whatever pur-
pose it may see fit by the action of the
state supreme court.

i

UNION WORKERS OPEN
ENERGETIC FOLLOW-UP
CANAASSAMONG ALUMNI
206 Committees Make Final Effort in
Campaign to Rreach Alumni
This Week
ONE HUNDRED AND ONE CLUB
MEMBERSHIP GAINING RAPIDLY
LARGER SUBSCRIPTIONS OBJECT
OF PRESIDENT HUTCHINS
ON TRIPS
This week will mark the opening of
the Michigan Union's 30--day follow-up
campaign, when the 206 committees
engaged in the work of raising a mil-
lion dollars will make their final ef-
fort to get in touch with every alumnus
in the United States who was not
called upon during the October can-
vast.
Many prominent alumni who did not
participate in the original campaign
have volunteered their services in the
work of the coming month, and trips
have been planned in all parts of the
country by these enthusiastic Michi-
gan graduates. Many of the commit-
tees reported at the end of the October
campaign that had not been able to
cover their territory with any degree
of thoroughness. The Detroit,- New
York and Chicago committees were
unable to see more than 60 per cent
of the alumni in their districts in the
time allotted, and it was for this rea-
son that the campaign was continued
for another month.
In addition to these trips that have
been planned to supplement the regu-
lar work of the committees, the found-
ers of the "One of One Hundred Club"
are making an especial effort to either
(Continued on Page Six)
WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
Exhibition of manuscripts, Memorial
hall, 9:00 o'clock.
Regents' meeting, law building, 9:00
o'clock.
Adelphi meeting, Adelphi rooms.
Alpha Nu meets, Alpha Nu rooms, 7:30
o'clock.
Cabinet Club smoker, Michigan Union,
7:15 o'clock.
Soph pharmic election, 1:00 to 3:00
o'clock, lecture room 303, chemical
building.
TOMORROW
Commerce club meets, 101 economics
building, 7:15 o'clock.
Band-Cer-Tainment, Hill auditorium,
8:00 o'clock.

Von Hindenburg Repulses Russ Attack
Berlin, Nov. 1.-General von Hii-
denburg has succeeded in repulsing
attacks at Puchin on the Riga railroad
southwest of Dwinsk. A Russian plane
was brought down near there today.
General Leopold has succeeded in re-
pulsing a number of similar attacks.
French Take 100 Prisoners
Paris, Nov. 1.-Fighting for the pos-
session of the territory in the region
of Tahura continued today without no-
ticeable change, the French taking 100
prisoners.
LIST OF CONSPIRATORS GROWS
AS NEW MEN ARE BROUGHT IN
Englebert Bronkhorst, Dynamite Ex-
pert, is the Lates to be
Accused
New York, Nov. 1.-Another German
was added today to, the list of conspir-
ators being held for $25,000 bail on a
charge of conspiring to blow up ves-
sels carrying arms and munitions to
the allies. His name is Englebert
Bronkhorst, a Bavarian, who was for-
merly in the German army, but is now
an expert on explosives. He is the
man from whom Robert Fay procured
his dynamite and, it is thought, his
funds.

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* * * * * * * * * * *
Ad. W. Righter Says-
There are many good things
in the world-many are better
than those which we have been
using. Some of them are right
around the corner. All they
lack is attention drawn to them
-knowledge of them-Adver-
tising.
* * * * * * * * * * *

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. > n To the right is
..v ACHI'S HAWAIIAN UKULELE QUARTET
FoUr melody makers from the antipodes MR1 As J
U who will present for the first Composer, ar
time at Michigan real Hawaiian comparable.
music. You can see them at the Chickering p
25c BAN-CER-TAINMENT 25c

an impressionistic view of
i GORNETZKY
rist, and pianist in-
He will make the
erform at the
HILL AUDITORIUM
TOMORROW NIGHT,,7:30

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