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October 31, 1915 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-31

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THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

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Dail y

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TEl;GIRAPI SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVII. No.2

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1915

PRICE FIVE CENTS

-- - r. ...a. r

ITERCEPTED PASS
PREVENTS WHITE
WAS FVARSITY
"JACK" BENTON PICKS UP FJUMBLE
AND RACES :4 YARDS FOR
TOUCDOWN
PAT SMITH INSTELLAR ROLE
Proves Valuable Asset to Backlield
When Placed in Game tihe
Second Half
Michigan did her level Lest to
"come-back" yesterday afternoon, but
stubborn old Syracuse flatly rebelled
and just simply refused to be the vic-
tims, and they left town with the
business-like end of the 14 to 7 score.
But don't you imagine for even one
fleeting moment that this Michigan
team of ours didn't play football.
They wore the same suits that clothed
the team that M. A. C. defeated, but
the resemblance stops right there.
They fought every inch of the way,
and it isn't "presumptious" to state
that when the battle rwas over, the
gentlemen from the east were fully
aware that they hadn't been invited
to come clear out here to attend a
pink tea or lawn social, or some simi-
lar function.
Perhaps the most spectacular fea-
ture from a Michigan point of view,
was provided by "Jack" Benton, and
was staged some 30 seconds before
the game was concluded. Benton
picked up a fumble and raced 35 yards
for a touchdown. The visitors had the
ball near the middle and were at-
tempting a trick play. Its execution
was a trifle faulty, and one of the
numerous backs who was scampering
around behind the line fumbled. Ben-
ton made a pass at the ball with one
hand, drove it to the ground, recover-
ed on the bounce and set sail for the
goal line. Several of the Orangemen
formed a persuing party but they
might just as well have been up in
the bleachers for all the damage they
could do.
Benton goaled and the game ended
two plays later.
The new "fight 'em" spirit was in
evidence, and every inch of the ground
was contested. "Wally" Nieman n
played well on defense, nipping Syra-
cuse runners on both sides of the
line.
Outside of Benton's little jaunt, per-
haps no one feature of the contest at-
tracted quite as much attention as
the work of "Pat" Smith who went
in for a few minutes. He was only
on the field for a brief space of time,
but he was the leading spirit without
even a close second. "Pat" carried
the ball four times for a total of 18
yards, ploughing through for four and
five yard advances every time he was
given the ball. He also threw a for-
ward pass to Dunne which gave Mich-
igan 43 yards, the longest Wolverine
gain of the afternoon. Syracuse tried
eight line plays while "Pat" was on
duty, and the big fullback made the
tackle on just six of 'these occasions,
and the total advance for the visi-
tors was five yards. On the other
two plays, the one "Pat" left for his
assistants, they advanced 13 yards.
Both of the easterners's tallies
came in the second period. This dis-
asterous stanza opened with the ball
on the 47-yard line. The first play
netted 8 yards, and on the next Cap-

tain Rose cleared the entire Mich-
igan team and sprinted unmolested
across the line. They goaled, and
Michigan kicked off. Syracuse march-
ed straight down the field, only paus-
ing after the line was reached. A
forward pass to White, the 273 pound
linesman, took the ball to the middle
of the field, and from here on they
(Continued on page 3)

FOOTBA L RESUT/IS
Cornell, 45; Virginia T. 14, 0.
Pennsylvania, 0; Lafayette, 17.
Oregon Aggis, 20; i.s A. C., 0.
Harvard, 13; PenneStas, 0.
Yale, 0; Colgate, 16.
Navy, 12; Nor h Caroline Aggies,
14.
Carlisle, 0; West Virginia, 14.
Dartmouth, 2; Amherst, 0.
Oklahoma, 23; Kansas, 14. w
Vanderbilt, 36; Tenessee, 0.
ALLI ES AY1RAVE
a ~ r mr faorbMOOgN haW aiy
Ang eorge Reported to be Reeo-er.
ainng, from al froisthrse
iW France
London, Oct 30.--Reports that Rout-
mani iea is ning seriously toward the
side of the allies have caused officials
here to view the Balkan situation in
a more favorable light than any
time since the invasion of Servia be-
gan. Berlin is reported to be in de-
spair of any chance of Roumania re-
nmailing neutral, and dispatches from
Bucharest say that there is no doubt
that Roumania is turning a willing
ear to the allies' cessions, with Arabia
ncl aded.
Roumania has 300,000, and perhapse
350,000, well-organized troops in readi-
ness, who are as well equipped as any
in the Balkan states. In addition to't
these forces, the sidting of Roumanial
with the allies will allow Russia andt
the allied troops to pass through tinat

Roehm About to Forward Pass

NATIONAL CA PAICb'N FO UNION TO BE
CO TINUE FOR EXTRA 30 DAY PERIOD;
COMITTEEMEN REQUESTEXTENSION
1% 1 1

Union Totals in
LeaingCities

I

.$ 5 o Ot t)

Detroit ..

Chicago...........
New York .........
Miriwap is .....-..- -
Ann Arbor ........
Grand Rapids
C(inciinalti.........
Tooleio .............
.Lansinig...........
Kansas City.......
Bay C ity ...........
Milivaukee.........
Boston............
Sagiai...........
Philadelphiua.......
Port Huron ........
Dallutlh .............
Ypsilanti ...........

10,1113
6,004)
«3,1)0
3,00
2,0(0
1,3310

i

UNION CAMPAHIGN WILL
CANASSFRATERNITIES
Ilei ership Committee Organizes Plan
to Solicit in Fraternities
and Clubs
Fraternities and house clubs will be
canvassed when the yearly member-
ship campaign reopens at the Michigan
Union on Tuesday and Wednesday of
this week, according to plans outlined
by Chairman D. R. Ballentine, '16, of
the committee, yesterday. -,
A system has been arranged where-

country unhindered. An unolletial re- by a man in each fraternity and house
port states that Russia has over 500,- club will be allotted to see the pros-
000 men waiting to cross into Rou- pective Union members in his or an-
mania, but this is double the logical ization. Letters will be mailed to these

estimate of the men available by the
czar.
There is little doubt here that Rou-
mania will join the allies in return for
the cessions of Arabia, despite the re-
port from Rome which says that diplo-
mats there have little or no confidence
in the ultimate action of Roumania
either one way or the other. ,
London, Oct. 30.-King George, who
was injured by a fall from a horse
while reviewing the allies' forces in
France, is reported as rapidly recov-
ering.
Germans Press Servians Hard
London, Oct. 30.-Reports here from
the frontier say that the Germans have
captured more territory along the en-
tire front of the Servian army front,
and that the Servians are in full flight
in a western direction. Bulgarian re-
ports tell of having captured 16 artil-
lery guns and great quantities of mu-
nitions and provisions along the front
in the Timok valley.
The Servians, however, say that
their troops are still in good order
and that with a small reinforcement
from the allies they can hold the Ger-
man and Bulgarian forces for two
weeks longer.
Report Three Turkish Ships Sunk
London, Oct. 30.-Indirect reports
from Bucharest say that the Turkish
warships Homal, Breslau and Hamid
I Yeh have been attacked by a Russian
squadron. A violent battle resulted,
but the result is not yet known. Ber-
lin in a statement made in The Tage--
blatt says that a large contingent of
Russians havesailed from Odessa and
Evastopol. These were convoyed by a
strong squadron, and the attack on the
Turkish vessels is thought to be more
in the nature of a repulse of an attack
directed toward the discontinuance of
the voyage.
The Hamid I Yeh is a cruiser built
for the Turks by Germany in 190_.

inen notifying them of their appoint-
ment tomorrow morning. Cards with
the list of names for each committee-
man have been prepared, and these
will be distributed at the Union be-
tween 5:00 and 6:00 o'clock on Tues-
day afternoon. About 40 of these lists
have been prepared.
C#1 IN EFS1E-AMERICAN INTERESTS
OR ANIZE NEW STEAMSHIP LINE
Washington, Oct. 30.-Officials of
the Wilson interests here are much
interested in the New Pacific and East
Steamship company which has been
incorporated with a capital of $2,000,-
000. This corporation, of which the
Chinese hold half interest, includes all
the officers of the Chinese legation.
The new line will operate ships carry-
ing the American flag, and will ply be-
t veen both Atlantic and Pacific coast
ports and the far east. The company
is getting its financial aid equally from
the United States and the Chinese na-
tion.
Billy and Mrs. Sunday in Syracuse
Syracu se,Oct. 30.-The Rev. William
A. Sunday and Mrs. Sunday arrived
here today over the New York Central
at 1:45 p. in. They received a welcome
at the depot which was as warm as
any that they have been the recipients
of at other cities where Billy Sunday
has conducted his campaign for the
saving of souls.

DAVID STAR JORDAN
WILL SPEAK TONIGHT
Famous Educator to Talk on Peace
Subject Before Wesleyan
Guild
Chancellor David Starr Jordan, of
Leland Stanford, Jr., University, who
speaks on "The Final Cost of War" at
7:30 o'clock tonight in the Methodist
church, arrived in Ann Arbor yester-
day from Saginaw, where he has been
attending the convention of the Mich-
igan State Teachers' association. Ac-
cording to present indications this will
be the biggest number offered to the
campus this year by the Wesleyan
Guild. Dr. Jordan is being entertained
at the home of Professor Reighard at
present, but leaves Ann Arbor tomor-
row.
Mr. D. W. Springer, secretary of the
National Educational association, who
knows Dr. Jordan personally, yester-
day remarked upon his great range
and comprehension of the most varied
subjects. One of his greatest .ad-
dresses, "The Function of the Univer-
sity President," attracted national at-
tention because of some of the asser-
tions made in it. "Recalling to mind
the rather unpromising inception of
Leland Stanford, Jr., University, and
the manner in which he has helped to
win for it a position commanding
world-wide respect," said Mr. Springer,
"we must give more than passing at-
tention to these assertions."'
Prof. W. T. Trueblood, of the ora-
tory department, has declared Dr. Jor-
dan to be "interesting, powerful and
direct; a very strong man, and greatly
sought after as a lecturer throughout
the United States."
Takes Action Against National Banks
Washington, Oct. 30.-Sharp action
was taken yesterday by Controller of
the Currency. John S. Williams to
check the imposition of usurious in-
terest on loans made by national
banks. A form letter was addressed
to all national banks calling their at-
tention to the national banking law
which prohibits such institutions to
charge over seven per cent interest

AMERICN TROOPS PUT
RiLA9ORESTO ROUT
M1exiean Rebels Beat Iasty Retreat
When Uncle Sam's Soldiers Put
in Appearance
El Paso, Oct. 30.-As a train carry-
ing Carranza's troops to Agua Prieta
pulled out from the station here this
afternoon it was attacked by a body
of Villa's troops, who rushed out from
their hiding place. The Villa men
were only a quarter of a iulle from
the train, with but the Rio Grande
between them and the loaded train.
A company of American soldiers ap-
peared from seclusion, and on their
appearance, the report states, the Villa
men "promptly about faced" and re-
treated into the hills. The attempted
attack resulted in the Americans dou-
bling their guard of the trains carry-
ing Carranza's troops to the front.
Artillery has been placed on a height
above El Paso commanding the scene
of the attack, and with this added pro-
tection it is considered by the authori-
ties that further attacks by theVilla
forces at this point will be eliminated.
El Paso, Oct. 30.--It is reported by
trainmen arriving here tonight that
dynamite was discovered on the track
near Fadena, which is nearly 30 miles
out from here. The report further
states that in a brief encounter with
the Mexican marauders the American
troops fired, killing one and injuring
two.
Allies Agree on Central Board
London, Oct. 30.-At a conference
here today between General Joffre and
Lord Kitchener, it was definitely de-
cided to, inaugurate a central board
which is to govern all the military ac-
tions of the allies. A closer co-opera-
tion between the allies is sought, and
this central board is the outgrowth of
this feeling. General Joffre was the
guest of the British war office today,
and while here held conferences with
all of the new British war officers.
WHAT'S GOING ON

CONCENTRAI1ON WEEK ENDS
WlTil TOTA 11O" $57,000
RAISED
CLUBHOUSEASSURED
Local Comumiteemen Want More time
in Which to Reach all
Amni
TOTAL NEAR $600,000 MARK
NEW YORK SHOWS LARGEST
GAIN WITH $8,000
ADDED
Michigan's national Union building
campaign has been continued for an-
other 30 days in response to the de-
mands of committee chairmen through-
out the country, the extension of time
having been necessitated by the in-
ability of the local committee to cover
the ground in the time originally al-
lotted.
IThe following night letter, which
was read in all committeetmeetings
last night, officially announced the
continuation of the campaign:
"Union authorities have received re-
quests from committees that campaign
be extended thirty days. University
favors this. Project must succeed not
only because of its own vital impor-
tance but for reputation of the uni-
versity and of her alumni. We are
conspicuously before the world. Hope
you will continue vigorous prosecu
tion of the work and follow up every
possible prospect. After your Saturday
meeting announce through the press
that campaign has been extended thir-
ty days on account of inability of com-
mittees to cover the ground in the
time allotted. Harry B. Hutchins."
The Union's grand total for the 30-
day campaign was approximately
$573,000 last night, and all of the cm-
mittees had not yet reported. This in-
cludes the $37,000areportedtfor the
final day of the canvass yesterday.
New York City reported the largest
gain of all the 206 committees sending
in totals last night, the chairman of
the New York committee announcing
a total of $25,000, with a daily gain
of $8,000. The chairman of the com-
mittee there also reported that his
men had been unable to see more than
40 per cent of their alumni in the
allotted time, and he expressed him-
self as favoring the proposed exten-
sion of time.
As one committeeman expressed it,
it is not a question of being able to get
the money, but of being able to get it
in 30 days. A great number of com-
mittee chairmen hae asked for this
continuation of time when making
their reports during the first part of
Concentration Week, and those back
of the national campaign have decided
to give the committees another 30 days
in which to see the remainder of th
alumni.
Late reports 'that will be recei.
on Monday morning are expected to
bring up the grand total to an even
$600,000, and this sum will be suffi-
cient to ensure the start of the actual
building next spring.
In Detroit, the chairman reports that
less than 50 per cent of the alumni
have been approached, and with as
good prospects amon the graduates yet
to be seen, the"Detroit committee.is
confident that it will be able to raise.
the $250,000 assigned it on the basis
of the number of alumni in that city.
The campaign will be pushed vigor-
ously during the coming month, and
as all of the committees are already
(Continued on page 6)

Wesleyan Cuild Lecture
avid Starr Jordan
Chancellor of the Leland Stanford Junior University
Subject: "THE LAST COST OF WAR."
Methodist Church, 7:30 P.M.

TODAY
David Starr Jordan speaks, Meth
church, 7::30 o'clock.
W. O. Thompson speaks at the
meeting, U hall, 6:30 o'clock.

odist
"Y,,

f/I

These g
m
They ar

i.

entlemen can sing--but not like that "Take me back to mother"---No!
[ichigan Concert Quartet Take me back to Ann Arbor!.
This Gent is one of the 29 Engineers who will
(DAVIS, SYKES, CARLSON, GROVER)
re all opera stars and full of melody Songs of Camp Da-
and fun
THEY WILL BE AT THEIR BEST AT THE

tc rya t : r .t as yr a

present

vis

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IN I / f ,
-<_ Y.. '

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BAN -CE-E---iAuditor- Wed. Nov. 3rd,7:30 PM.

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