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October 30, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-30

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THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

Th"'de

I11 a1

Mks
y

Phones :-Editorlal 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVII. No. 23.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CEN'

__ _ _ - _ _

STRACUSE PUTS
TO TEST 'CO0M E
BACK' O0F TEAM
ORANGEMEN COME HERALDED AS
ONE OF STRONGEST SQUAD
OF THE EAST
WESKE TO START AT TACKLE
Rumored Shift of Be'hton to Fullback
Discredited, as Veteran Goes
to His Old Post
* * * * * * * * * *

Cold W7orld Looks

Lack of Bail Keeps Discouraged Boy
inl Prison COIl For Alix
Month s
A happy yo uth stepped out from be-
hind prison bars yesterday morning
and ock a frey., dep breath of tlthe
crisp autumn air. There was a smile
on his face, for it was the first free
breath he had drawn in six months.
When Edward L. Goggia came to
Ann Arbor a year ago from his home
in Honoeye Falls, N. Y., he intended
to enter 'the university. Finding that
his credits were short, and that he
would not be admitted, Goggin decid-
ed to stay in Ann Arbor and earn his
living waiting table rather than go
home to his parents with the disap-
pointing news. Everything ran alongI
smoothly until the boarding-housef
which employed him lost some of its
student trade, and so discharged many
of its waiters, including Goggin.

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PREMIER BR/AN FORMS
COALITION CABINET TO
GUIDE FRENCH AFFAIRS

Representatives of All Factions
Included in Reorganized
Body

Are

OUTIlOK EVEN GLOOMIER THAN
0EFORE CONCERNING BALKANS
BOTH GREECE AND ROUMANIA
SAID TO BE CONSIDERING
NEW GERMAN OFFER
Paris, Oct. 29.--Aristide Briand, the

*
* Michigan
* Benton.......
* Watson......
* Whalen......
* Niemann..
* Cochran (C.)
* Weske......
* Staatz.....
' Roehm.
Maulbetsch..
* Catlett......
* Raymond....

Syracuse
L.E.....Du Moe
L. T.......... Cobb
L. G. ...Schlachter
. C. ...McDonough
R. G......White
R. T. .....Johnson
R. E......Burns
Q.B. ....Meehan
L. H....Rose (C.)
R. H. .....Slater
F. B. ..Wilkinson

That occurred last
positions were scarce.

February,
Penniless

* Referee-J. C. Holderness (Le- *
* high). *
* Umpire-L. Hinkey (Yale). *
* Game called at 2:30 o'clock. *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
With 3,000 loyal students cheering
in the darkness, the Michigan Varsity
completed its final practice for the Syr-

acuse struggle
noon.
Shortly after
marched onto
"The Victors,"
lowing behinld.
journed to the7
reinforcements

late yesterday after-
5:00 o'clock the band
Ferry field, playing
with the rooters fol-
The procession ad-
north bleacher, where
were discovered, as

several hundred had preceded the main
delegation down State street. The Var-
sity was concluding a long signal
drill, and the cheering section shouted
the name of almost every individual
connected with the college pastime
who resides here in Ann Arbor.
"If they won't fight after this dem-
onstration," remarked Coach Yost aft-
er the cheering had been under way
for several minutes, "they-they-well,
they ought to be hung," finished the
coach. Certainly no Michigan football
aggregation has received such support
for years. "Hal" Smith and "Bob"
Bennett were on hand to lead the
cheering, although it was so dark that
the rooters found considerable diffi-
culty in' seeing the movements of the
two leaders.
Staatz and Benton will start at the
two extremities of the line. Benton
(Continued on Page Three)
BAND SCOURS CAM PS
FOR BRILLIANT FESTIVAL
Michigan Concert Quartet Added to
List of Attractions for the
Band-Cer-Tainment
From "The Victors" to "The Yellow
and Blue," the complete program of
Michigan's - first Band-Cer-Tainment,
to go on the boards of Hill auditorium
at 8 o'clock Wednesday night, will be
announced tomorrow morning. Spar-
ing no efforts to make every number
the best thaticould be wrung out of
the campus, it will not be until this
late date that the organizers will be
able to fill out the nine parts of the
program.
The recent addition of the Michigan
Concert quartet to Wednesday night's
list of attractions settles the formerly
doubtful question as to just what num-
ber is to take the title headliner for
the evening. H. L. Davis, '17, leading
(Continued on Page Six)

out of work, Goggin in desperation
signed his name to worthless checks'
In May he was arrested for passing a
forged check amounting to $9.00 on
a State street haberdashery. All
,>,- ' Yggin remained in jail, for
there was no one to bail him out,
awaiting the Octgber term of court.
Yesterday the youth, a little pale
from his summer's detention, stepped
before the bar in Judge E. 1). Kinne's
court room wondering how long a
sentence he would receive. Then the
judge briefly and clearly stated that
the sentence of Goggin, who had been
found guilty, was suspended.
In suspending the sentence Judge
Kinne said in part:
"It is five months since Coggin's
arrest, confession and incarcer:,ion.
His regret, his penitence and his pu r-
pose to reform I believe to be si'
cere. He is not yet 20 years i age.
Since I have been uron the bench
there has been no ease with like fea-
tures.
"There has been drawn to and
about hima circle of most devoted
friends, including all of the officers of
court. Many delegations have pre-E
sented to me their wishes in his be-
half. I have neither met nor heard
of a single enemy.
"The sentence in this case of this
defendant is suspended, and if his life
in future reflects the wishes and the
earnest belief of his multitude of
friends his experience, in Ann Arbor
will not have been in vain."'
Goggin was given a position yester-
day noon.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
t

newly-appointed premier, announced
today that he has drawn up his cab-
inet and would submit the names for
confirmation tomorrow.
The cabinet as outlined by the pre-
mier will contain representatives of
all factions, political differences hav-
ing been forgotten in the formation of
the new body.
The list of members in the new cab-
imet as it will be submitted tomorrow
follows:
Premier and minister of foreign af-
fairs, Aristide Briand.
Minister of war, General Gallieni.
Minister of marine, Admiral Lacaza.
Minister of finance, Ribot.
Minister of commerce, Clementel.
Minister of public works, Fendet.
Minister of justice, Viviani.
Minister of the colonies, Donmergue.
Minister of public instruction and
war invention, Painleve.
Minister of ariculture, Meline.
Minister of state without portfolio,
De Freycinet,
- Secretary of state with seat in cabi-
net, Tampon.
(Continued on Page Six)
~AYS.IFT DETA'LS
UF GERMNS' PLOT
Feders, Agents Sleuth for Allies in
lobokeit For Teuton
EXplosives
S IAD)W "LiTTLE FATHERLAND"
New _Vork, Oct. 29.-Full details of
the plans drawn up in Germany and
foiwarded here for the wrecking of
American musn ions, plants and ves-
sels carrying war supplies to the Al-
lies, may be made upon the arrest of
the man who attempted to carry out
the plans in this country.
Federal agents are making a thor-
ough search of Hoboken's "little Ger-
many," where explosives are thought
to have been hidden by German inter-
ests. Money sent from Germany is
thought to have afforded the means of
obtaining these explosives for the pur-
pose of making bombs and mines.
Plenty of evidence has been brought
to light which leaves no doubt in legal
minds here that there has been con-
siderable violation of neutrality. Many
details concerning the findings that
have been made already are being
withheld, but the authorities expect to
be able to take the matter into the
courts within a short time.
Former Governor of Vermont is Dead
Montpelier, Vt., Oct. 29.-Former
Governor Stewart J. Middlebury died
at his home here today.

SOIClITORlS GIN
I$16,000 TOTAL FO A9
UNION BUILDING FUN) NOW IA
$534,416 TOWARD MILLION
GOAL
DETROIT GAINS MOST GROUNI
Nun Arbor, Chicago, Minneapolis and
New York Anong Cities
to Report
Michigan Union campaigners yester-
day shoved the building fund total up
to $534,416, the Friday subscriptions
amounting approximately to $16,000.
Detroit committeemen showed the
biggest returns from yesterday's can-
vass, the workers in that city report-
ing $6,000, which boosts the Detroit
total for the month to $151,250. The
men in the state metropolis report
continued enthusiasm on the part of
alumni there and the solicitors have
been everywhere received with a
hearty welcome.
Ann Arbor was another city to swell
the day's totals with an unusual
amount, the local committee reporting
$2,370 for the Friday campaign. This
brings the monthly total up to $17,815,
which compares favorably with the
amounts subscribed in other cities.
Chicago alumni added a considerable
amount to their Thursday totals, the
Windy City workers announcing a
grand total of $51,000 for the cam-:
paign to date. The enthusiasm of the
Chicago men was commented on fa-
vorably by President Harry B. Hutch-
(Continued on Page Six)
NORMAN ANGELL TO
Noted Writer on Internaltion: I Ques-
tionus Vomes to Ann Arbor
in I)ecemnber

S
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University Speaks Under A uspices
of Wesleyan Guild
TALKER AT METHODIST CHURCH
EXPOUNDS GREAT WAR STATUS

'I

"LEAGUE TO ENFORCE PEACE"
FOUNDER MAKElS HIT IN
FS ~

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Dr. David Starr Jordan, of Leland
Stanford Junior university, will stant
by the guns for scientific amelioration
and restriction of war and scientific
peace in his talk at the Methodist
church at' 7:30 o'clock tomorrow night.
His subject is, "The Last Cost of War.'
Dr. Jordan is coming directly fromr
thag conventionvof state teachers at
Saginaw. He will be entertained at
the home of Prof. J. I. Reighard, whc
was a student in his undergraduate
days under Dr. Jordan.
The New York Times spoke highly
of the California chancellor after an
address at New York a few days ago.
Dr. Jordan has been active in the east
in the founding of the League to En-
force Peace, of which ex-President
Taft is now the head. Extracts from
statements made by Dr. Jordan in New
York are as follows:
"There are not many encouraging
things' in our time," stated Dr. Jordan.
"The period is one of the blackest the
world has ever known, and the outlook
is rosy to us mainly because we in
America are accustomed to take rosy
views of things. But there is one
thing that is encouraging, and that is
that so many people in the world are
trying to think out ways not of stop-
ping the war but of making it so that
there will not be another; of so ad-
justing the affairs of the world that
another war will be practically im-
possibhi."
Dr. Jordan says that about 30
schemes have been carefully developed
all having in view war prevention, and
that one of them, with which a large
part of the American people are ac-
quainted, is the League to Enforce
Peace.

CRISIS IN GRECIAN CABINET BE-
COMES MORE CRITICAL
DAY BY DAY
JOFFRE AND TIFFANY MEET
General Advance Along Whole Line in
Serbia Reported; Teutons
Gain () Miles
London, Oct. 29.-The crisis in the
Balkans precipitated by the failure of
the Greek government to take a defi-
nite stand for either the allies or the
Teutonic forces overshadows all other
considerations here today.
The attitude of the Athens govern-
ment is as puzzling as it was when
the invasion of Serbia began, and the
crisis in the Greek cabinet is becoming
more critical each day.
The Entente powers have sent word
to King Constantine to either enter
the war against the Teutonic forces
or demobilize, while the Austrian and
German diplomats in Athens are do-
ing everything in their power to stim-
ulate opposition.
A Greek vessel passing from Scora-
dos to Saloniki sighted a submarine
which rose to the surface and hoisted
and dipped the Austrian colors while
the crew lined up above board. Shouts
of "Long live Greece!" resounded from
the submarine.

A1hIOR OF "(AREAT.

DRDD STARR JDAN GREELKS CONTINUE
ILLR URGE SINTIoI TOKEEPWARIN
PEACETOMOW! NIGHT O R C ES I N DOUBT

ILLUSIO

7

SEVEN YEARS
BE BROK

1908.
1909.
1910.
1911.
1912.
1913.
1914.
1915.

Syr,3

' DEADLOCK TO
EN TOI)AY? *
wuse Michigan *
28 4
0 44 *
0 11 *
6 6
18 7 *
7 43
20 6 *
'7 9 *
, , e 4 4 *

Norman Angell, author and news-
paper manager, will talk in Hill audi-
torium on the night of December 3.
His subject will be some phase of the
Great War, on which he is perhaps
the most authoritative writer today.
In addition to full page articles
which appear almost weekly in Sun--
day supplements, he has been turning
out a vast number of magazine ar-
ticles. "The Great Illusion" is per-
haps his most widely read book, and
it has been translated into nearly
every language on the globe.
Mr. Angell was born in 1874, and
grew up through a system of private
education at home and in connection
with a French lycee. While still a
young man, he migrated from Europe
to western United States. He became
a ranchman, a prospector acid later a
newspaper cub reporter.
His success dated from the year he
left for Europe (in 1898) to corrsspond
for several papers, and to write
books. Of the seven or eight books
which he has turned out in the last
several years, nearly all are on inter-
national relations of the various
powers.

-

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WHAT'S GOING ON

I'

Morgan Recovering from Operation
New York, Oct. 29.-The condition
of J. P. Morgan, following his opera-
tion, indicates that the financier will
experience a prompt recovery. Mr,
Morgan is at his home in Glencove,
L. I.

* * * * *

d
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Joffre Confers With Tiffany
London, Oct. 29.--General Joffre ar-
rived in this city today to confer with
Earl Tiffany, secretary of state for
war, going at once to the war office
after his arrival here. General Joffre
was closeted with Earl Tiffany for
some time.
It was reported here today that
King George had suffered injuries
while riding today, the Prince of Wales
arriving from France with the news,
and proceeding at once to Buckingham
palace upon his arrival in London.
Germans Gain in Serbia
Berlin, Oct. 29.-An authoritative
report of the German staff says that
there has been a general advance
along the whole line in Serbia and
that the Teutonic forces have pressed
the natives troops back for 50 miles
along the main railroad from Bel-
grade.
The Serbian defense is rapidly weak-
ening, according to the German report,
and the Anglo-French force is fighIting
its way desperately toward Nish in an
effort to reinforce the Serbian defend-
ers before they are forced to give up
the city.
The reported capture of Pirot by the
Bulgarian army of invasion was con-
firmed here today by more complete
accounts from Sofia. Pirot is 35 miles
southeast of Nish, lying 10 miles in-
side 'the Serbian frontier. Firot lies
on the Nish-Constantinople railroad
and has been putting up a stubborn
defense against the attacking Bulgar-
ian force for several days.
Fighting in West Not Decisive
Berlin, Oct. 29.---There has been con-
siderable fighting in the western the-
ater with no decisive results as yet,
while both Germans and Russians
claim the advantage in the battle that
has been raging about Dvinsk. Fight-
ing also continues along the whole
northern front, with both sides claim-
ing minor victories.

TODAY
Class football, south Ferry field, 10:00.
o'clock:
Soph medics vs J-medics.
Fresh lits vs. senior medics.
"Y" Book Exchange open, 10:30 to
12:30 o'clock. Closes for semester.
Syracuse vs. Michigan, Ferry field,
2:30 o'clock.
Michigan Union Dance, 9:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Unitarian church, "Revivals, Their In-
fluence on Social Reform," 10:30
o'clock.
Congregational church, Rev. Douglass,
"The Luxury of Being Unspoiled,"
10:30 o'clock.
Church of Christ (Disciples), Rev.
Knepper, "What Men Live By," 10:30
o'clock.
W. O. Thompson speaks at the "Y"
meeting, U hall, 6:30 o'clock.
David Starr Jordan speaks, Methodist
church, 7::30 o'clock.
Prof. Leroy Waterman, Menorah so-
ciety, Newberry hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Cosmopolitan .club reception in Harris
hall at 3.:00 o'clock.
Jewish Students' congregation meets
in Newberry hall, 6:45 o'clock.

SALE OF STUDENT DIRECTORY
BREAKS ALL FORMER RECORDS
Sales of the Student Directory broke
all records yesterday. From 4 o'clock,
when the sales commenced, up to the
time of going to press nearly 1,000
copies were disposed of.
The books are on sale at the book
-I s-e nery stores, and it is expect-
l L. - 'Iwbalance of the entire edi-
tion, consisting of 2,100 copies, will
be sold out this morning.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION STS.
Leonard A. Barrett
SPEAKS Sunday Morning at 10:30
Theme: "NECESSITY FOR A CONVICTION IN LIFE"11
Being the fourth address in a series on "The Necessities for Life."
Students' Bible Classes At Noon

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** * * * * * * * * *
Ad IV. Righter says-
Every man who reads your ad
s cu prospwthe customer for
you.
The Michigan Daily has 7,000
readers. -

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cuans>
,.

Today
FERRY FIELD
ADMISSION $1.00

Syracuse vs.

mich'igan

Today

Fifty Ushers wanted for the Cornell Game. Iteave names
with nr. Rowe, at the Athletic Association Office.

C ME CALLED, 2:30 P. M.
GATES OPEN, 1:00. P. M.

WNW

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