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October 28, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-28

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THE DAILY
ETA$2.50 A
NEWS OF THE WORLD ANDj
TECAMPUS

The

Phones :-Editorial 2414
K

Mich igan

Daily

I

Phones:-Editorial '241
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THEI
NEW YORK SUN

VOL XXVIL No. 22.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1915.

ANNUAL SMOKER
BRINGS GRIDIRON
SEASNTO CLOSE
THIRD ANNUAL UNION AFF.AIP
WILL BE HELD IN GYM
AFTER PENN GAME
COMMITTEES TO BEGIN WORK
Dean M. E. Cooley and F. F. McKin-
ney, '16L, the Probable Speakers
For the Occasion
Michigan will close its gridiron sea-
son with a third annual football
smoker to be held under the auspices
of the Michigan Union. It will prob-
ably be held the Tuesday evening fol-
lowing the Pennsylvania game, in
Waterman gym.
Arrangements for the smoker be-
gan yesterday, when the committee
appointments for the affair were
made. Paul Thompson, '16L, was
made general chairman, and he an-
nounced yesterday that he will call
a meeting of his sub-chairmen and
committeemen early next week. Lee
17. Joslyn, '17, was appointed head of
the program committee, Arthur H.
Torrey, '16, will act as chairman of
the finance committee, and Thatcher
Rea, '17E, will head the committee on
arrangements.
While no definite program has been
arranged, the entertainment will
probably consist in speeches by
alumni, undergraduates and faculty,
and music by the band and the musi-
cal clubs, according to Chairman Jos-
lyn of the committee in charge. An
effort will be made to secure Dean M.
E. Cooley, of the engineering college,
as faculty speaker, and Francis F.
McKinney, '16L, managing editor of
The Michigan Daily, will probably
represent the undergraduate body.
Those who have been appointed to
serve on the arrangements committee
are: J. Hawley Otis, '17E, Cyril Tal-
bot, '17, A. D. Bromley, '17E, H. W.
Collins, .'17E, Fred Thieme, Jr., '18E,
F. M. Sutter, '18E, L. P. Brown, '18,
S. G. Pratt, '18E, H. W. Wall, '18, A.
V. Livingstone, '18E, C. Andrews, '18,
H. P. Coulter, '18, W. P. Sickler, '18E,
T. McAllister, '18, and G. S. Mack, '18.
Members of the program committee
are: A. S. Hart, '17, W. L. Watson,
'17E, W. L. Kemp, '18, and J. Sicher-
merhorn, '18. The committeem en on
finance are: Ralph H. Harbert, '17,
J. J. Herbert, '17L, R. S. Winslowv, '18,
and H. D. Long, '17E.
"I Guess I'm Foolish"
Says Alleged Horsethief
"I guess that I'm foolish," is all that
Edward Kosmoss, arrested yesterday
on the charge of horse stealing, would
say when questioned last night.
About 5:00 o'clock yesterday morn-
ing Alton Hinkley, a farmer living
near Ypsilanti, discovered tht his
horse and cart had been stoler.. He
immediately notified Sheriff H. G. Lin-
denschmitt, who got into comminica-
tion with the authorities at Ypsilanti.
The sheriff learned that a horse and
cart answering the description given
by Hinkley had been seen passing
through Ypsilanti about 6:00 o'clock
in the morning.
A deputy sent out from the local jail
returned shortly afterward with Kos-

moss in custody. The prisoner proved
to be a hired man who had worked
for Hinkley about four week: ago.
Kosmoss is being confined in the coun-
ty jail pending trial.
Shell French Lines .
London, Oct. 28.-Belgium is now
the scene of marked activity, for the
Germans are shelling heavily the
French lines in an effort to penerate
the defenses of the western line.

~1

Eberybody Out!
THIS AFTERNOON MARKS THE LAST DAY OF
PRACTICE BEFORE TOMORROW'S TILT WITH SYRA-
CUSE. ALL WEEK THE TEAM HAS BEEN WORKING
LATE BEHIND CLOSED GATES IN AN ENDEAVOR TO
PERFECT A FIGHTING MACHINE THAT WILL INAUGU-
RATE MICHIGAN'S COME-BACK. TIME REFUSES TO
WAIT FOR PREPARATIONS, SO WE MUST MOULD
THE ELEVEN UNDER A FORCED DRAFT. MONDAY
SAW ONE OF THE MOST SPIRITED OVATIONS EVER
GIVEN A MICHIGAN TEAM. IT CHEERED UP THE
WEAK-HEARTED, STIFFENED THE QUITTERS, SI-
LENCED THE KNOCKERS AND INJECTED FIGHT ANI)
BACKBONE INTO THE MEN WHO ARE TO SHOULDER
THE RESPONSIBILITY OUT ON FERRY FIELD TO.
MORROW.
IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO HOLD A MASS MEETING
THIS WEEK-END. SO INSTEAD A BIG "YELL-FEST"
AT THE FIELD HAS BEEN ARRANGED FOR. WE
CAN'T AFFORD TO LET' THE ENTHUSIASM WHICH
TURNED MONDAY'S MEETING INTO A FRENZY DIE.
YOU INSPIRED THE TEAM ONCE. YOU CAN DO IT
AGAIN.
THE TIME SET IS 5:05 O'CLOCK. AT THAT TIME
ONLY A FEW CLASSES AND LABORATORIES WILL BE
IN SESSION. NO OTHER ENGAGEMENTS ARE SACRED
TO THIS MEETING. AT DARTMOUTH THE STUDENT
BODY REPAIRS TO ALUMNI FIELD ON AN AVERAGE
OF THREE TIMES A WEEK, TO CONTRIBUTE THEIR
SHARE TOWARD BUILDING UP A POWERFUL MA.
CHINE. AND AT DARTMOUTH THE ABSENTEES ARE
CALLED ON TO SHOW CAUSE FOR THEIR LACK OF
SPIRIT. CAN IT BE SAID THAT DARTMOUTH MEN
ARE MORE LOYAL THAN WE?

PEA V ODY SCHOOLGIRLS PERISH IN FLA7LS;
REIJ FIELD TO RESIGN?; PRINCE TON GLES
BIG GIFTS; WILSON TO H E92 SUFFRAGISTS

PRICE FIVE CENTS
BRIAND , CILI ST
MADE PREMIER1TO
OFFERED POSITION BY POINCARE
FOLLOWING COLLAPSE OF
CABINET

Boston, October 28.-The lives of 19
school girls, ranging in age from 6 to
16, were snuffed out in the fire that
swept the St. John's parochial school
at Peabody early this morning. This
is thought to constitute the complete
number of deaths, but if it is true
that a number of children were en-
trapped in the upper floors of the
building, as many of the sisters be-
lieve, there are still more bodies to be
found.
Most of those who were killed were
trampled to death in a Jam inside the
front entrance and at the foot of the
main stairway. Scores of boys and
girls of all ages are suffering from
minor burns and bruises, many of
which may be fatal.
At the time of the boiler explosion
which started the fire there were 2 8
boys and 434 girls in the school, who
immediately rushed screaming to the
doors and windows of the building.
Many gained immediate safety, leaving
the rest to struggle out of the packed'
exits as best they could.
Redfield May Resign
Washington, Oct. 28.-Secretary
Redfield soon may resign from the'
cabinet. His reasons, as nearly as
could be ascertained today, were that
the statements charged to him to the
effect that foreign goods will be land-
ed in this country at low prices are
untrue. The president was surprised
by the news and said that he has no,
knowledge of the affair.
Suffragists to 'Get Hearing
Washington, Oct. 28.-President
Wilson has consented to give women
suffrage agitators another hearing on
December 3. .
Governor Will Not Sign Petition
Lincoln, Neb., Oct. 28.-The govern-
or of Nebraska today declined to sign
a petition which the petitioners intend.

to send to congress asking that body
to pass an amendment to the consti-
tution granting women the right to
vote.
Princeton Receives $500,000
Princeton, Oct. 28.-Gifts amounting
to $500,000 have recently been received
by the trustees of the university, ac-
cording to a statement made at their
annual meeting here today. The exact
sum is $463,928, of which Mrs. Russell
Sage gave $250,000 toward the erec-
tion of a new dining hall, and Mrs.
W. E. Thurston, of New York, gave
$125,000 toward supplying the Dodge
professorship in medieval history.
Sought Conference Uninstructed
Washington, Oct. 28.-Ambassador
Gerard recently went to the German
capital and asked for an interview
with the emperor in the interests of
peace. He has been given no instruc-
tions to seek a conference with the
kaiser.
Washington officials state definitely
that no peace movements will be in-
itiated by the United States, but that
if any are started by the belligerents
this country will be glad to act in
the capacity of mediators.
Would Oust Teuton Professors
Boston, Oct. 28.-Maud D. Mott, of2
Chicago, wants to know why Harvard
does not get rid of her instructors and
professors who are of Teuton birth.
As a daughter of one of the founders
of Harvard, she asks why men who
are decidedly not acquainted with the
ideals of American citizenship are al-
lowed to instruct the young men of
this country.
B. & 0. Pier Burns Down
Baltimore, Oct. 28.-Fire destroyed
pier 34 of the Baltimore & Ohio rail-
road this evening with a loss of ap-
proximately $1,000,000.

HALLOWE'EN PARTY TONIGH TO
HAVE NOVEL FEATURES; SAT-
URD)AY D)ANCE AS USUAL
Two membership dances will be
given at the Michigan Union this week,
a Hallowe'en party tonight and the
usual weekly dance tomorrow night.
Tickets for the first dance went on
sale at the Union at five o'clock on
Wednesday and are nearly all sold.
There will be special programs, spe-
cial decorations and special music at
the Hallowe'en party and punch will
be served. The dancing will last from
9:00 to 2:00 o'clock. Mr. Lyman L.
Bryson and Mrs. Bryson and Mr. and
Mrs. I3. G. Grim will be the chaperons.
The committee in charge of the dance
is: Russell A. Collins, '16; chairman;
Cyril Talbot, '17; Robert Collins, '17;
Willis Nance, '17.
The chaperons for the Saturday
night dance will be Prof. A. F. Shull
and Mrs. Shull and Mr. M. C. Weir and
Mrs. Weir. The dance committee for
Saturday is: Frank L. Nesbit, '17,
chairman; Staatz Abrams, '17; Lester
Moll, '17L; Arthur Kirkpatrick, '18.
A new design for the Saturday night
programs is being made and will be
completed soon. The Alpha Rho Chi,
architectural fraternity, is in charge
of the worl;.
Christy Mathewson Leaves Diamond
New York, Oct. 28.-Christy Mathew-
son, for many years the mainstay of
the New York Giants in the pitching
box, and regarded as one of the world's
greatest twirlers, will never again don
a uniform, according to a story signed
by him which appeared here today. He
says that the doctors have little hope
of every getting his arm into shape
again. He adds that he is seriously
thinking of coaching the Harvard base-
ball team.
Wheat, Flour and Corn Exports Gain
New York, Oct. 28.-Wheat and flour
exports from the United States and
Canada for the week ending Oct. 14
were 10,638,086 bushels, an increase of
5,274,018 bushels over the same last
year.
Corn exports during the same period
were 3,354,373 bushels. This is also
an increase over last year's exports
for the corresponding period of 1,685,-
665 bushels.

Ghosts and Spooky
Stunts for Guests
Ghosts, thunder, electrical disturb-
ances, mystifications and "spooky"
stunts in general are promised to those
who pay the 13c admission fee to the
"Superstitious Social" to be given at
the Congregational church parlors at
7:30 o'clock tonight.
Among the special Hallowe'en stunts
will be a Michigan-Syracuse game in
miniature, besides mystic mountains
and evidences of witchcraft. It is ru-
mored that part of the admission will
be refunded, making a net cost of 5c.
U. S. WILL SEND TWO NOTES
1110 AUTHORITIES AT LONDON

ALLIES SEE PERIL IN BALKANS
Serbs Hope to Hold Off Bulgarians
Until Reinforcements Can
Arrive
Paris, Oct. 28.-Aristide Briand was
today offered the premiership of
France by President Poincare, follow-
ing the resignation of Premier Rene
Viviani and the subsequent collapse of
the entire cabinet. M. Briand, who is
a Socialist, took immediate steps look-
ing to the formation of a new minis-
try. General dissatisfaction over the
foreign policy of the former premier
is given as the cause of his resigna-
tion.
Information from the best sources
as to who will succeed the fallen min-
isters points to the selection of the
following men:
Aristide Briand, premier and min-
ister of foreign affairs.
Jules Cambon, general secretary.
De Freycinet, vice-president of cab-
inet, without portfolio.
Viviani, minister of justice.
Gallieni, minister of war.
Admiral Lacaze, minister of ma-
rine.
Ribot, minister of finance.
Doumergue, minister of colonies.
Painleve, minister of education and
invention,(the latter newlycreated).
Bourgeois, Combes, Denys CocLir,
Jules Guesde, ministers without port-
folios.
Greece to Disarm Allied Troops
London, Oct. 28.---An official report
from Budapest states that Greece has
served notice on Great Britain that if
the allied troops now stationed at Sa-
loniki are not promptly removed it
will be forced to disarm them.
London, Oct. 28.-Efforts of the op-
position to make use of the situation
in Serbia as an argument against fur-
ther action by Great Britain in the
Balkans have been continued. This
line of action has served one purpose,
that of awakening the English to the
perilous position of the allied forces
ih the Balkan states,
Following the union of the German
army which crossed the Danube at
Orsova and the Bulgarians who in-
vaded Serbia near Prahovo, the allies
havd practically given up hope of
holding the northern frontier of Ser-
bia. Their only hope- ies in the south,
where the Serbians, reinforced by the
British and French, are making an he-
roic stand against the invading Bul-
garians.
Have Open Road
The central powers now have an
open road through northwestern Ser-
bia and Bulgaria to the Aegean sea
and Constantinople. This means that
they are now able to send guns and
ammunition to their Turkish and Bul-
garian allies, who will be greatly
strengthened thereby. If the Bulgar-
ians can be held off in the south until
Anglo-French reinforcements arrive,
it is thought that Macedonia will be
saved from Bulgaria.
* * * * * * *

First Will Protest Condemnation
Cargoes; Second Will Ask for
Release of 29 Vessels

of

Washington, Oct. 28.-It was defi-
nitely settled in a conference between
President Wilson and Secretary of
State Lansing today that two notes
will be sent to London by the presi-
dent. The first will protest the action
of the prize court in condemning the
cargoes of four vessels on the pre-
sumption that they were to be used
in Germany.
In the second note a request will be
made for the release of 29 vessels
which have been seized but have not
yet come before the prize court. This
action, based on a report received by
the state department, is said to have
been urged on the president by Sec-
retary Lansing.
Building Expenditures Hit High Total
Chicago, Ill., Oct. 28.-Building ex-
penditures of 141 American cities for
September aggregated $68,881,448, a
gain of 30.5 per cent over the Septem-
ber of a year ago. The South and New
England made the greatest progress in
building activities.
Urge Exportation of Foreign Securities
Berlin, Oct. 28.-German newspapers
are urging exportation of foreign se-
curities, of which nearly $7,500,000,000
worth are held in Germany. The pa-m
pers recommend a special tax to com-
pel holders to send stocks to neutral
banks as security for credits.

ALUMNI TAKE GREAT
INTEREST IN U NION
UNION CLUBHOUSE CAMPAIGN
AROUSES ENTHUSIASM OF
GRADUATES
FOLLOW-UP CANVASS TO COM:
Advisory Committee Plans Personal
Campaign Among Wealthiest
Graduates
Michigan's alumni are taking- hold
of the national campaign for a new
Union clubhouse with tremendous en-
thusiasm, according to local officials.
Beginning with next week, university
graduates will start their promised
follow-up canvass, in which the weal-
thier alumni will be solicited for con-
tributions to the million-dollar fund
which is to build, equip and endow
the proposed new home of the Union.
The present week marks the close
of the 30-day campaign, in which prac-
tically every former student at the
university has been solicited by one
of the 206 committees who are at work
on the canvass.
The total amount subscribed up to
last night was $418,097, which does not
include the $100,000 received from stu-
dent life subscriptions.
Many of the most influential alumni
have signified their intention of en-
tering into the actual work of solicit-
ing subscriptions, while others have
undertaken to aid the work by person-
(Continued on Page Six)

S BN I EVER
HEAD',SAYS YOST
Mnusflans Receive Praise of Coach at
"Enthusiasm Smoker" for
Band-Cer-Tainment
PROMISE UNSURPASSED PROGRAM
"No Michigan man who claims to
have an ounce of loyalty for the team
should hesitate one-tenth of a second
to purchase one of those tickets," said
Coach Fielding H. Yost at last night's
"Enthusiasm Smoker" at the Union for
the Band-Cer-Tainment of next
Wednesday night.
The coach's talk was given before
(Continued on Page Six)
WHAT'S 'GOING ON
TODAY
Engineering society smoker, room 311,
engineering building, 7:30 o'clock.
Fresh architects nominations, room
445, engineering building, 3:00.
'Shooting exhibition, south Ferry field,
3:30 o'clock.
I Students' Directory out, 4:00 o'clock.
Twilight yell-fest for the rooters; meet
in front of University hall, 5:0
o'clock.
TOMORROW..
'Class football, south Ferry field, 10:00
o'clock:
Soph medics vs. J-medics:
Fresh lits vs. senior lits.
Fresh engineers vs. soph engineers.
"Y" Book Exchange open, 10:30 to
12:30 o'clock.
Syracuse vs. Michigan, Ferry field,
2:30 o'clock.
Iichigan Union dance, 9:00 o'clock.

C

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The ADVERTISERS' CLUB
has secured the services of Ad
W. Righter, 'a man of long ex-
perience in the advertising
game, to assist members of the
club in bringing to the minds of
DAILY. readers the value of
"following the ads." Ad will
start work tomorrow morning.
* * * * * * * * * * *

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FIVE DAYS
EARLIER THAN
LAST YEAR!

Ilfll
t'll

"We Don't Like to Brag," But Here We Are--

The Students' Dirnctorv
S,;ale Today at 4 o'clock

Ill
1l~

LOOK'
Earlier! than
1914 by 5 Days
1913 by 7 Days
1912 by 37 Days
1911 by; 57 Days

On

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