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October 28, 1915 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-28

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THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLDAN
THE CAMPUS

The

Michigan

Phones:-Editorial 2414
TELEGR Business 960TH
IlyTELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
14*4'~LP I .7 J EW YORK S UN

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VOL. XXVIL No. 21.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

PRC IV ET

HALF MILLION MARK
PASSE IN CANVSS
FOR UNION HOME
GAIN OF $5,1602 ON AMOUNT RE-
POWIED YESTERDAY BY
WORKERS
BIG SUBSCRIPTIONS TO COME
President H. B. Hutchins Aids Saginawi
Situation; Students Asked
to Mail Letters
Reporting a gain of $35,162 as a re-
sult of their efforts on the second day
of Concentration Week, the Union's
national campaign committeemen yes-
terday boosted their total above the
half-million mark. The total, as re-
ported back to the local committees
from the central office last night, is
$500,210, which includes the $100,000
received from student life member-
ships.
Detroit's committee turned in the
biggest report of the day, the state
metropolis announcing the signing of
more than $6,000 yesterday, raising
their total for the month to $142,175.
This is far ahead of any of the other
committees, Detroit having been asked
to raise one-quarter of the million-
dollar total that is the goal of . the
Union's mammoth campaign.
Chicago, New York City and Cleve-
land all reported gains of more than
$1,000 yesterday, the other increases
being confined to small amounts which
were scattered throughout the remain-
ing committees.
President Harry B. Hutchins will
work with the Saginaw committee
while in that city this week attending
the meetings of the state teachers' as-
sociation. President Hutchins spoke
in the interests of the Union campaign
earlier in the week in St. Louis and
Kansas City, where he was enthusias-
tically received.
Perhaps the most promising thing
about the returns received up to this
time has been the total absence ofr
large subscriptions. But one $10,000
subscription has been reported, about+
20 for $5,000 and a few for $1,000, all
of the rest being in sniall amounts.
Less than $100,000 has been reported3
in large subscriptions, and this fact
more than any other makes the suc-
cess of the Union project seem abso-
lutely certain. Those alumni who are1
able to give large amounts to th' mil-1
lion-dollar fund hesitate to do so, until'
they are certain that the campaign is1
to be successful, but those back of the
project are confident that the more
wealthy graduates will responl lib-t
erally when they see that the successI
of the campaign is assured.<
The Ann Arbor committee met atf
the Union club house Tuesday forz
luncheon, at which time the 26 mem-I
(Continued on Page Six) r

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Detroit ..............$142,175

Chicago..... .
Minneapolis.........
Ann Arbor ............
New York .............
Grand Rapids ..........
Cincinnati ............
Los Aneles ............
Cleveland............
Kansas City...........
Lansing............
Milwaukee.......... -
* * * * * * * * *

42,985
21,000
15,195
14,593
10,343
8,260
6,200
5,500
5,500
4,400
3,620
* *

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COSMOPOLITAN CLUB ASSIGNS
MEMBERSHUP CANVASS BEATS,
Expect a Number of American Stu-
dunts to Joiu; Work to Con-
tinue for Rest of Week.
Cosmopolitan Club membership
committee met in Harris Hall last
night for the purpose of assigning
beats for canvtass. Foreign students
where assigned to canvassers ac-
cording to residence districts, de-
partments, and nationalities.
All fees, including initation and

COMPLICTIONS BETWEEN
MEXICANS AND BRITISH
BECOME MORE SERIOVI
Kidnaping of Englishman May Caus
Internatioi l Difficulties, it
is Said
TROOPS OF VILLA THOUGHT TO
BE HOLDING HIM FOR MONE
INFANTRY REGIMENTS ORDEREI
TO ENTRAIN FOR DOUGLAS;
FEAR VILLA ATTACK
El Paso, Texas, Oct. 27.-Interna
tional complications between the Brit
ish government and the ex facto gov
enment of Carranza were precipitated
by the kidnaping for ransom of Er
nest F. Attox, a British subject an(
property owner in Durango. The Ro
man Catholic jurist has also been
taken from Duanatedi into the moun-
tains and the two are being held. Su-
perintendent Henderson has sent a
message from Duanatedi to Tarre
which contains a plea to British Con-
sul Miles at El Paso. Death is the
outcome if the ransom is not paid. It
is thought that Villa troops under the
command of Gen. Urbina at Duana
tedi are responsible for the act.
El Paso, Texas, Oct. 27.-Gen. Fidel
Avilla, the last of the Villa leaders in
Chihuahua, reached Juarez today. He
is supposed to have gone there for
the purpose of conferring with other
Villa leaders, but it is thought that
the real motive of his journey was to
get to this country to escape the forces
of Carranza.
El Paso, Texas, Oct. 27.-Two regi-
ments of infantry, the Seventh and the
Twentieth, have received orders to en-
train for Douglas from Aqua Preata,
where they have been expecting trou-
ble. Two batteries of artillery have
been sent to Douglas from Nogales.
These batteries arrived recently from
Fort Sill, where they have been in
readiness for an attack from Villa
forces. If Villa has as large a force
as it is thought he has he will be
more than a match for Gen, Talles,
of the Carranza forces. The great dis-
advantage of Villa will be his lack of
munitions. The Carranza forces are
very securely fortified behind trenches
and barbed wire entanglements.

Se
y
D
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dues, have been reduced to a mini-
mum of one dollar, sixty cents to
be used as subscription to the Cos-
mopolitan Student and the rest for
expenses;, therefore a large member-
ship is expected. Only foreign stu-
dents will be canvassed, but inas-
much as friendship of foreigners
brings with it a knowledge of inteh-
national questions of the day, many
American students are counted on
to join and will be especially wel-
comned.
Most of the canvassing will be done
during the remainder of this week,
in order to bring out a large at-
tendance at the club social next Sun-
day. Several soloists have been se-
cured for the musical program. Plans
for the year will be outlined, and
refreshments served. The social will
be given in Harris Hall, northwest
corner of Huron and State streets,
at 3:00 o'clock Sunday afternoon. All
students are invited to attend.
MUST CLAIM MONEY AND BOOKS.. -
AT "Y" EXCHANGE SATURDAY

David Starr Jordan, Fresh From
War Scenes, to Give Peace Talk

Over $60 still remains to be claimed
by men whose books have been sold
this fall by the "Y" book exchange.
All men who have books or money to
be claimed at the "Y" will be given
their last opportunity to claim it this
fall on Saturday morning at th "Y"
office between the hours of 10:30 and
12:30.
MARY ANTIN 61 YES
MIGRATION THEORY
Tells 1,200 Listeners in University Hall
That America Can Solve Big
Question
'TELLS WHY FOREIGNERS COME
ASKS HEARERS NOT TO CONDEMN
RACE BECAUSE OF ONE
TRAIT
"Americans will solve the immigra-
tion problem if they will only do what
they teach their children to do," was
the keynote of Mary Antin's address
in University hall last night before
about 1,200 listeners. Her lecture on
"They Who Knock at Our Gates,"
given under auspices of the Oratorical
association, shook out the entire immi-
gration problem from top to bottom.
"We landed as a destitute Russian-
Jewish family at Dorchester, where we
stayed because we could get a better
view of the bay and the sunset," said
the "Little Jewess." "We wanted to
assimilate, to put our name on the
front door, to chat over the back fence
with the American neighbors.
"Afer burying myself in libraries, I
found that many writers have been
stirred by one conception-that the
immigrant is no longer of any use.
But the immigrants have been build-
ing up for this country a world su-
premacy in industry.
"Do not," she stated tward the con-
clusion, "symbolize some fictitious ra-
cial fault as the race, but reat the
incoming foreigners as individuals;'
Woman Doctor to Lecture on Hygiene
Dr. Elsie Pratt, university physician
for women, will deliver a series of
lectures on hygiene. The first lecture
is scheduled for Wednesday, November
3,, at 5::00 o'clock, in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall. The rest will be given
on the following five Wednesdays, at
the same time and place. Theso lec-
tures form a part of the required work
in physical education, hefte all en-
rolled in this work, regardless of their.
class, are required to report. Seats
will be assignW in alphabetical order,
and the atendance will be taken at
Jeach~ lecture.

FIRST MICHIGANDEB, DETROIT
CLUB PUBLICATION, APPEARS
The first number of The Michigander,
a magazine published monthly under
the auspices of the University of Mich-
igan Club of Detroit and edited and
backed by some of the biggest men
that Michigan has graduated in recent
years, has appeared. The purpose of
the magazine is to keep the members
of the Detroit alumni in close touch
with Michigan and the doings about
the campus.
The first number contains an article
about the $1,000,000 campaign, with a
cut of the proposed Michigan Union
building, and an article on the present
football situation. Several other in-
teresting subjects, such as the record
enrollment of this year and the com-
ing football smoker, are also dealt
with in this number.
D. HAINES, '09, WRITES NOVEL
WITH NAVAL WAR AS THEME
Donald Hamilton Haines, '09, has
recently written a book entitled
"Clearing the Seas." The book deals
with the adventures of two American
boys during a supposed naval war be-
tween the United States and a foreign
power, and among the thrilling inci-
dents is a submarine fight, an attempt
to blow up the Panama canal anid a
gigantic naval battle between the rival
fleets.
Mr. Haines is the author of another
book on the same theme, "The Last
Invasion," also deaing with military
adventures, and has written many
short stories and articles published in
national magazines.
rudiclary Council Makes Library Rule,
Owing to the inability to study in.
;he library, due to conversation and
'visiting."' the judiciary board asks"
hat every Michigan woman co-operate
eith it in the endeavor to make the
ibrary a place where one may study.
'his matter can be quickly, quietly
nd satisfactorily adjusted if every
oman will consider it her personal
uty.
'OPULAfR DTROIT''
PRECHER TO TALEi
tev. M. S. Rice, of Football Mass Meet-
ing Pame, Secured to Open "Y"
Bible Meetings
OMMITTEE TO EXPLAIN PLANSt
Rev. M. S. Rice, who has been char-c
cterized as the "Detroit Jloard of g
ommerce Preacher" ever since that
rganization put its vacation cruisea
st year off a week in order that heo
ight go, will speak at the Y. M. C. A.f
eligious education "Explanationv
fight" meeting at Newberry hall att
o'clock tonight. Mr. Rie is ,knowni
the student body as the "preacherl
rho 'brought down the house' :at thex
ennsylvania football mass meetinga
tst year."
He has been secured to put before
te 150 faculty men and students who
ave been especially inv'ited and all
thers who desire to hear him, a con-
eption of what the *tatu of Biblet
tudy in a university town and in a
niversity student's life should lie.
.ccording to Rev A. W. Stalker, oft
e Ann. Arbor MWethodist church, NvIr..
ice is undoubtedly in demand as
ublic speaker as much as any preac~-
r in Methodism todayrh and it is az

pen secret that some of the largest
ulpits in the country have been of-.
red him.
"Explanation Night" has been pro-,
ided as a preliminazy- to the big Ini-
ersity hall meeting ot Sunday night,
t which time the preisident of O. S.,
., Dr. William 0. 'hompson, will
peak.
Tonight's meeting is expected to
ive a vision of the plans and aims
f the enlarged Bible study work for'
his year, Charts havre been prepared
howing the methods and organization
Rdet which the "Y" Bible school'
which is to be led by Prof. W. D. Hen-
erson will be conducted.1
Especial pains 'have been taken by
he departmental committees to inviter
large number of men who, while they
re interested, have not in the past -
een intimately connected with this
roup discussion work. The commit-
ees expect these men to come out and
ear the case of the "Y."

YOST TO PLEAD BNDS
CAUSE ATUNION TONIGHT
Expressing the sentiment, "Let's Go
Michigan, to Pennsy," Coach F. H.
Yost will speak at the Michigan Union
at 7:00 o'clock tonight. He will open
the mass meeting and smoker that is
to bring Wednesday night's Band-Cer-
Tainment forcibly before the campus.
Following Coach Yost, "Johnnie" Maul-
betsch will speak from the players'
point of view.
The band will be on hand to assist
"Bob" Bennett in raising some real
"come-back" yells, while cider, to
soothe the bad effects of cheering, and
doughnuts will be on hand.
"MUSICAL CLUBS MOST
IMPORTANT CTIIT"j
SAYS PRO ,:8, IB-BERT
First Smoker for Musicians at Union
Develops Permanent Organ-
ization Plans1
ASSURED COAST TRIP CAUSESt
LIVELY INTEREST IN WOFK t
NUMEROUS FEATURE ARTISTS AL-c
READY ARE IN LINE FOR
FIRST CONCERTs
"The musical club can do more forv
Michigan than any other single activ-t
ity on the campus," was the essence
of a speech given by Prof. C. B. Vib-r
bert, of the philosophy department, at
the first smoker of the musical club
given at the Union last night.
As it is almost certain that the clubt
will take a coast trip this year, thet
members of the organization are de-d
termined to make this year's organ-
ization the best ever. The first con- p
jser4 of the year will be held on De-
cember 10, and it is planned to have
at least two or three more concerts
before the trip.
The program last night consisted of
several good specialties and the pros-
pects for feature artists look partic-0
ularly bright.
One of the interesting points brought i
up was that the club be closer organ-
ized. Harvard has followed this plan
and found it increases interest and
makes the organization a permanent a
one. After two years of active ser- 1
vice, the men, if their work has proved l
satisfactory, become eligible to the 1
.ermanent Musical club, which is one
jf the highest honors a student can T
glet. .
D. R. Ballentine, '16, student man-R
a ger, emphasized the point that notB
o.aly the best singers would be eligible n
fc'r the trip to the coast, but that men t
who showed interest and worked for
the club had an equal chance. Accord-
ing to his statements, no definite num-
her of men for the trip has been set,
but as many men will take the tripa
as the financial standing of the organ- T
ization will allow.
f
s
Class Treasurers Must See Registrars
Registrar A. G. Hall, auditor ofw
student activities, wishes all class -
treasurers to see him at their earl- t
lest convience, as he desires to in-w
struct them in the management of
their accounts. t

VON HINDENBURS'S,
MEN' MAKING DRIVE
BEFORE COLD SETS~
GAIN FROM 1,000 TO 2,000 YARDS
IN THE DVINSK
REGION
ENGLISH GUNS DESTROY PLANES
Atistrians Slay 3000 Italians in Repell-
ing Attack on Doberdo
.Pateau
Berlin, Oct. 27. (By wireless.)-In an
official statement issued here today it
was announced that Field Marshal Von
Hindenburg has been able to capture
from 1,000 to 2,000 yards of ground
from the Russians in the Dvinsk re-
gion.
With the approach of winter, which
has already set in on some- parts of
the eastern front, the gains which Von
Hindenburg is making every 4ay are
regarded as significant. Conditions in
the east are worse in winter than in
the wet season, inasmuch as the
ground freezes so hard that nothing
can be done with it.
Von Hindenburg has been kept for
some time from achieving the Dvina
river, but he is making a grand drive,
with the hopes of gaining it before
the extreme cold sets in. Conditions
on the remainder of the eastern front
remain unchanged.
3,000 Italians Slain
Vienna, Oct. 27.-In the fighting yes-
terday on the Doberdo plateau more
than 3,000 Italians were slain imme-
diately in front of the position of one
Austrian regiment. Attacks were re-
pulsed by the Austrians all along the
talian front.
English Bring Down Airmen
London, Oct. 7.-An official state-
nent of Sir John French says that
wo German aeroplanes were brought
[own by British anti-aircraft guns.
)ne of the planes fell within the Brit-
sh lines.
Desertion List Smaller
London, Oct. 27.-Males of 12 years
nd upward who left the country in the
2 months ending on September 30
ast for the purpose of escaping en-
istment is about one-third of the num-
er that left in the previous 12 months.
the figures, which are official, are 36,-
94 and 101,663, respectively. Walter
Runciman, president of the British
Board of Trade, estimates that the
umber of men fit for naval service,
rom 18 to 45 years of age, is not more
han 31,000.
Cornell in Good Form After Game
Ithaca, N. Y., Oct. 27.-After three
lays of rest, the Varsity was out on
he field again today and warmed up.
the team showed exceptionally good
orm in spite of the fact that in a
3crimmage with the scrubs the latter
were able to score one touchdown and
ne field goal. This is explained by
he fact that the team was simply
warming up. The squad is in very
Ine shape and it is expected that all
he regulars will be in the game
gainst Virginia Polytech on Satur-
lay. There was a long signal drill in
vhich the team worked on a number
)f new plays for the Michigan game.

Will Talk on "Lightnining Protection"
J. L. Buchanan, of the General Elec-
tic company, will give an illustrated
lecture on "Lightning Protection" at
7:30 o'clock this evening in room 348
of the new engineering building. The
address will be given under the aus-
pices of the university branch of the
American Institute of Electrical En-
gineers.

"Tremendous power marks
every word and gesture of Chan-
cellor David Starr Jordan, of Le-
land Stanford Junior university,"
remarked Secretary D. W. Sprin-
ger of the National Educational
association ini an interview yes-
terday,
The visitor will appear in the
Methodist church auditorium
Sunday night in the Wesleyan
guild series. 1is text will be,
"The Last Cost of the War." All
university students are invited.
Dr. Jordan probably has re-
ceived more university degrees
and holds more active posts of
honor than any other educator
in the world. He is the only
man on the lecture.platform to-
day who has been 'in all the
warring nations during the past
pighteen months. It is with his vast
Vducation in nearly every branch of
human isnoxwvedge and from his first
hand acquaintance with Europe that
he puts "treinemldpus power" into his
address,
superintendent of Public Instruction
Edward Hyatt, of California, recently
gave out the following statement after
Dr. Jordan had delivered* some 40

r

WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
Class football games, south Ferry field,
3:30 o'clock:
J-laws vs. senior laws.
Soph lits vs. J-lits.
Senior engineers vs. J-engineers.
Alpha Nu meets, Alpha Nu rooms, 7:30
o'clock.
Fresh pharmics election, 303 chemical
building, 11:00 to 12:30.
Rev. M. S. Rice, "Explanation Night"
:meeting, Newberry hall, 7:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Twilight yellfest, University hall, 4:00
o''eock.
1i ngineering society smoker, Michigan
Union, 7:00 o'clock.
l\ Mseting of Webster society, Webster
mooms, 7:30 o'clock.
I Ulowe'en party, Michigan Union,
$:00 o'clock.
3ujerstitious social, Congregational
dhurch, 7:30 o'clock.

sp'eeches within two weeks at the Pan-
amap exposition this summer.
"The InternatiQnal Congress of Ed-.
ucators from every Important power
on the globe was presided over by
Chancellor Jordan. He towered like
one of our California red-woods over
the surrounding timber, and -he made
it look like shrubbery."

* * * * * * * * * * *
* The DAILY announces the
* ADVERTISERS' CLUB which
* has as members all DAILY ad-
* Vertisers. Its purpose is to
* bring to the minds of Michigan
* students theDadvertisers who
" support the DAILY.
We believe in reciprbcity. Wat
this space.

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