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October 27, 1915 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-27

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THE DILY
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS'

I h e

i iicl igan

Daily

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVIL No. 20.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

.PRICE.FIVE

FEDERAL SECRET
SERICE MEN TAK(E
DEFINITEI ACTION
AR1RAItN IiELYI'E ANT V AY ' N
Il)WINt VP OF 81111
PLACES CLOCKORKED BOMBS
Authorities Tiying to Locate Men
"Higher Up," Who Are Supply-
ing Funds and Materials
New York, Oct. 26.-Federal author-
ities have decided to take definite ac-
tion in regard to the attempt to OR -
stroy liners carrying munitions to the
Entente powers. Lieutenant Robert
Fay, of the Sixteenth Saxon infantry,
was arraigned today on the charge of
conspiracy directed toward the blow-
ing up of munition-carrying ships.
Fay is one of the five men accused
of complicity in the plot to place
clockwork bombs on either the rud-
ders or propellers of munition ships.
The bombs were to be so timed, states
the man on confessing, as to destroy
the vessels on the way across the At-
lantic.
Fay's Integrity Doubted
It is stated by authorities that. the
German lieutenant is concealing some
important matter. The glibners and
frankness of his statement3 are
thought to be ruses to detract the at-
tention of the American secret service
from more important matters. Hence
an attempt is being pushed to locate
the men "higher up," who are supply-
irg. funds and material such as' thatA
usedsin explosions experiments on the.
Hudson river.
A vast amount of evidence just un-
earthed by the service is reported to
contain valuable clues. It is intimated
here that Germans are at work in
fields altogether unsuspected by the
public.7
Absolves Two Germ'an Officers
It is expected that speedy adjust-
ments will be made in the matter,
chiefly because of the attitude of the
German offices at Washington. Cap-.
tain von Papen, German military at-r
tache, and Captain K. Boy-ed, naval
attache of the German embassy, ar'et
both reported by Fay as having re-t
fused any assistance in the schemes.

P

A

J
,I

MIGNIIIAN'S COM[IIACK
PRINCETON ETA5@
WAS.16.- AL
r .
* A. 24-
I~I
I.
WILLIE HESTON :-A CWAN HAS COME BACK BEFORE, AND WILL NOW.

Chicago ...........
Minneapolis .........
Ann Arbor.........
New York ..........
Grand Rapids ........
Cincinnati ...........
Los Angeles........
Lansing.............
Cleveltnd..........
1V lwaukee .........

CONCENTRATION
' WITH AN I
Detroit..... .... ...$136,200

41,665
21,000
14,905
13,463
10,343
8,260
6,20)
5,400
4,112
3,620

H~

WEEK STAHTS
NgREASE OF S40,0O

TONIG1HT'S LECTURER
GIN MUCH PRAISE BY
.MEMBERS OfF FAUT

0106

LOCAL COMMITEE S HOLD
FIRST OF EDAIL D E ET
IN4GS SCHEl)ULED\

Mary Antin, Who Speaks
Hael Tonight, Also
Authoress

at University
Famous j

REPORT BRITISH SHIP
TORPEIDOEDBY TEUTONS
Rumors from London State That Eng-
lish May Withdraw Forces
from Serbia
London, Oct. 26.-Reports have just
been flashed here that the British
transport "Marquette" has been tor-
pedoed by the Teuton allies in the
Aegean sea. A part of the crew has
been saved, but a large number of
those on board have not yet been ac-
counted for.
English lMay Quit Serbs
London, Oct. 26.-Men in high offi-
cial circles here state that English in-
terests in Serbia are a mistake. It is
thought that Serbian troops will han-
dle sufficiently well the German inva-
sion of Serbia and that British forces
are not needed.
This sentiment rises almost siniul-
taneousiy with reports of considerable
victories by French arms on Bulgarian
soil, which partly offset the Bulgar
gains at Negotin and Prohovo.
German Taube Taken
Paris, Oct. 26.-A French monoplane,
after. a fierce duel with a German
Taube, brought the invading machine
down and captured two German offi-
cers. The engagement took place just
north of Bernaux.
UNION MEMBERS, NOTICE!
Less than 30 students respoided to
the invitation to aid in sending out the
30,000 Union letters to alumni yester-
day, the few who offered their time in
the interests of the national building
fund campaign succeeding i putting
out close to 5,000 letters. All Union1
members having vacant hours today
can aid the million-dollar campaign by
assisting in this work.

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"THE PROMISED LAND" ONE OF
POPULAR BOOKS IN LIBRARY
PROFESSORS COOLEY AND TRUE-
BLOOD SAY SPEAKER HAS
REAL MESSAGE
Mary Antin, authoress and lecturer,
will stand behind the guns for Amer-
icanism and the rights of man in her
talk in University Hall at 8:00 o'clock
tonight. Ijer address, "They Who
Knock at Our Gates," is heralded by
favorable comments from authorties
like Prof. C. H. Cooley, of the sociol-
ogy department, and Prof. T. C. True-
blood, of the oratory department.
Professor Cooley stated that "Mary
Antin has a message of deep sociolog-
ical import; she speaks from expe-
rience, and would benefit any student
interested in such questions as immi-
gration." Professor Trueblood, in an
interiew last night, said: "The speaker
is powerful in address and grips her
audience with her convictions. All
who hear her realize that they have
been listening to an appeal for true
Americanism and the rights of man."
General admission tickets for the
affair are on sale at Wahr's book store
on State street, under the direction of
N. E. Pinney, '16, who reports that the
sale is large, a fact which assures the
financial success of the Oratorical as-
sociation's venture.
(\;rijell Expects Hard Michiigan Game
Ithaca, N. Y., Oct. 26.--The coaches
at Cornell say that it is a mistake to
take th Michigan team lightly- and
they are the authorities for the prom-
ise that the men will see two weeks
of hard work before they start for
Ann Arbor. Doctor Sharpe, who re-
turned today from New Haven, where
he spent Sunday due to the illness of
his wife's mother, said that he thought
the work of the team at Harvard en-
titled it to an extra day of rest. In
a talk to the men this evening, the
faults of the game Saturday were
taken up and the expansion in the
style of play to be used was discussed.
Dixie Club Plans to Welcome New Men
Members of the Dixie club will hold
their first meeting of the year at the
Union at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow even-
ing. Plans will be arranged for the
work of this year. There has been a
hearty reception planned for all South-
ern freshmen. All Southerners on the
campus are invited to attend.

XassNeeting?No!
H ere 's One Better
Students Will Follow Band to Ferry
Field anud Cheer Team at
Practie
By Henley Hill
Mass meetings-even' of thevariety
of Michigan's super-mass meeting of
Monday night-may be forced to give
way to the new 'thusm-raiser-the
twilight yell-fest-if the idea works
as well as it sounds.
The rooters gave the Varsity a lot
of encouragement Monday night, but
that was just a starter--a' first min-
ute, as someone said then-to the
three "come-back" weeks that Mich-
igan's football team has before it.
So down on Ferry field Friday af-
ternoon, after classes are over and
just before the team finishes its prac-
tice, this new yell-fest will have its
inception. The team will be there in
action. The rooters will be there-in
action. And the Varsity band, "Hal"
Smith and "Bob" Bennett also will be
there to get the rooters and the team
into a mutual understanding about this
"come-back" business. It's to te just
like a regular game with everybody
there except the opposing team.
Yost, cheered by the confidence of
the campus, is back at the team ham-
mer and tongs, and according to re-
ports from Ferry field, has got the
squad working at top speed again. The
rooters, as Monday night has shown,
are going to be at the game Saturday
with "ginger" to burn. Friday's meet-
ing is to be a sort of "pep-epidemic"-
contagious as well as infectious to
team and rooters alike.
The rooters and band probably will
meet at University hall or the Union
clubhouse at 5:00 o'clock and march
to the field in a body. But the details
are yet to be fully arranged.
Adelphi Discusses the Literacy Test
Members of the Adelphi Debating so-
ciety held their regular meeting last
night in University hall. Representa-
tive George F. Hurley, '16, '18L, in-
troduced a bill providing for the lit-
eracy test for immigrants to the Unit-
ed States. A heated discussion on the
merits of the bill was led by Repre-
sentative N. E. Pinney, '16. At the con-
clusion of the regular business the
meeting adjourned.
American Miners Organize
El Paso, Oct. 26.-Reports received
here today from Catoras state that
a number of American miners have
gotten together to form the Ananea
Mining Co. This action was taken in
an attempt to guard against further
loss to their property, which has been
confiscated by Villa in his advance. At
Chihuahua another company has been
formed with a similar end in view.

"BAND TO PENNSY"
IOBJECT OF SMOKER
Volunteer Ticket Sellers should Re-
port at Union Tomorrow
Evening
TICKETS SELL FOR A QARTER
First shots in the campaign to
"Send the Bany to Pennsy," that will
culminate in Michigan's first Band-
Cer-Tainment next Wednesday even-
ing in Hill auditorium, will be fired
at an organization mass meeting and
smoker at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow night
at the Michigan Union. Talks, intend-
ed to send the volunteer ticket sellers
and workers on their way full of en-
thusiasm over the project, will be
given by the most eloquent speakers
that the management can secure.
With Monday night's mass meeting
still ringing in their ears, the organ-
izers are confident that enough men
will seize on this method of showing
their loyalty to the team to make the
smoker a success. "Johnnie" Maul-
betsch will attempt to convey to his
hearers some idea of what the pres-
ence of the band on the field means
to the eleven, especially when it is
away from home. The remainder of
the speakers will be drawn from the
campus at large.
The management wishes that all
men who have any interest in the
band, and those who wish to take an
active part in paving its way to
Pennsy with quarters, will report. It
is especially urged that the fraterni-
ties send representatives from among
their upper classes and as many
freshmen as they can pry ,away from
their books. Inducements along the
line of eats and drinks are to be of-
fered, while musical entertainment
will be supplied by a picked orchestra
of the Varsity band.
Tickets for theBand-Cer-Tainment,
that are to sell for a quarter apiece
will be given to those present, and
instructions as to just what they are
expected to do will be given the men.
It is planned to make the program as
short and as to-the-point as possible.
It is through the kindness of the
musical clubs that the band was able
to secure the Union tomorrow night
for its smoker. The mandolin club
had planned to use the hall on the
same evening, but consented to change
its date to tonight in order to accom-
modate the bndmen.
J. L.' Buchanan to Address Engineers
J. L. Buchanan will address the
student branch of the American Insti-
tute of Engineers at 7:30 o'clock
Thursday evening in room 348 of the
engineering building. His subject
will be, "Lightning Protection," and
will be illustrated by stereopticon pic-
tures.

SELECT MANOIN CLUB
MEMBERSFOR THE YEAR
Musical Clubs to Hold Joint Smoker
at Union Club House
This Evening
Names of those who made the Man-
dolin club have finally been an-
nounced. The try-out was held last
Thursday evening, but the results
were withheld until now in order that
the eligibility committee might go
over the list. This was thought advis-
able in order that by no possible mis-
take could the name of an ineligible
man be announced.
The officersare striving to bring the
Mandolin club and the Glee club into
closer relationship this year. With
this idea in mind, they have arranged
a smoker to be held at the Union this
evening. All members of the Glee and
Mandolin clubs are asked to be pres-
ent. The date of this affair was form-
erly announced for Thursday but was
changed in order to let the band have
the Union on that date. All men who
(Continued on Page Six)
SITUATION IN MEICO
REGARDED__AS SERIOUS
Villa Is Moving Toward Chihuahua
and Officials Fear Trouble
on Border
Washington, Oct. 26.-Officials are
inclined to regard recent develop-
ments in Mexico in a serious light. The
situation at Douglas, Arizona, is espe-
cially unpromising. The attack is ex-
pected to take place soon on the Car-
ranza forces just south of Douglas.
Villa is reported to be moving on
the city with a force of 8,000 men and
is now west of Chihuahua. Carranza
is making preparations to reinforce
his stand and a pitchedbattle is ex-
pected. It is thought that there is
some danger of the effects of the bat-
tle reaching over too near Douglas,
and it is against this that the officials
are guarding. The seriousness of the
situation was called to the attention
of Secretary of War Garrison by Sen-
ator Ashurst, of Arizona. Secretary
Garrison discussed the question with
the president today and has assured
the senator that all steps will be taken
to preserve life and property of the
people of Douglas.
WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
Fresh engineering assembly, room 348,
engineering building, 11:00 o'clock.
Technic out, noon.
Mary Antin, "They Who Knock at Our
Gates," auspices of Oratorical asso-
ciation,- U hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Soph pharmics election, room 300,
chemical building, 1:00 o'clock.
Glee and mandolin club smoker, Mich-
igan Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Band rehearsal, School of Music, 7:00
o'clock.
Dr. P. W. Merrill speaks on "Photo-
graphic Astronomy," Church of
Christ, 7:00 o'clock.
Forestry club meeting, room 214, sci-
ence building, 7:30 o'clock.
' TOMORROW
J. L. Buchanan speaks on "Lightning
Protection," room 348, engineering

building, 7:30 o'clock.
First meeting of Dixie club, Michigan
Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Band mass meeting and smoker, Union,
7:30 o'clock.

IDETROIT REPORTS $136,200
Expect Reports of Next Three Days
Will be Evenu More
Encouraging
Concentration Week in the Michi-
gan Union's national building cam-
paign started with a rush yesterday,
the comnnittee reports for the openng
day showing a gain of $40,000 over the
last report. This brings the total sub-
scriptions pledged by alumni up tt,
$365,048, which makes a grand total
of $465,048 when the $100,000 of stu-
dent life memberships is added.
Each of the 206 local committees
throughout the country held the first
of the daily meetings scheduled for
this week at noon yesterday, from
which meetings the local committee
reports were wired to the Ann Arbor
office. Last night the total amount re-
ceived at the central office was report-
ed back to each of the local commit'
tees by night letter, the reports being
read at today's meetings.-
In this way each committee keeps
in touch with the progress of the na-
tional campaign, the daily increase in
the totals serving as an inspiration to
the individual workers. The daily
meetings also afford the different mem-
(Continued on Page Six)
GOVERNOR FERRIS TO ATTEND
COOK DORMITORY DEDICATION
Will Be Present at Dinner Given to
Regents as Part of Official
Exercises on Nov. 2
Governor and Mrs. Ferris will be in
Ann Arbor Tuesday evening, Nov. 2.
They will be here to attend a dinner
given to the Board of Regents as part
of the informal dedicatory exercises of
the new Martha Cook dormitory.
Bishop Kelly and several other prone-
inent people will'be here to speak, but
the others have not yet been an-
nounced. There will be a faculty re-
ception from 8:00 till 11:00 o'clock, at
which the residents of the dormitory
will act as hostesses.
"WHOLLYUNTRUE"
SAYS DEANCOOLEY
Denies Statements in Detroit News
That Ills Approlisal Was Ordered
Out by D. U. R.
CITY FARE ZONE SUNDER RIGGS
In an interview with a Daily re-
porter late last night, Dean M. E.
Cooley, of the engineering department,
branded as false statements concern-
ing the D. U. R. appraisal which ap-
peared in a late edition of the Detroit
News. "It doesn't seem to me worth
while to say anything about it," was
the first reply of the dean when ques-
tioned, but when the specific allega-
tions were read to him he made the
following statement:
"The statement that the appraisal
was paid for by the D. U. R. is true
enough. It is a state statute that the
concern for which the railway com-
mission makes an appraisal is made,
to pay for it."
"Was held back for many months
for the D. U. R.," is another allega-
tion. -
"That is false, absolutely," Dean
Cooley declared.
"Was given out when the D. U. R.
ordered it," was the next statement
that was read to the dean, to which
he replied even more emphatically

that it was false.
"Last week the D. U. R. legal staff
was in touch with Cooley to have the
appraisal released at this time,"is
the last specificscharge, in the paper.
"They have been at me for the last
six weeks to publish tl e figures, and
since early in September they have
given me no rest," declared the dean.
"So far as the city one-fare zone
values go, I have had nothing to do
with it. Prof. H. E. Riggs, of the
engineering college, separated these
values from the other figures," was
the final declaration of the dean.

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