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October 26, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-26

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_ , . ,

I THE DAILYI
NEWS 0OF THE WORLD AMJ)
I THE CAMPUJSI

ichigan

Daily

I

I

Phones :-E ditorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVC BY THE
NEWV YORK SUN

r

VOL. XXVII No. 19.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

F DEAN CPOLEY'S
D.U.R. APRIA

The Pep Is Here!
ICome On, Last!

Ma mol hl Snake Dance Follows
Mass Meeting, Signifying
Mornl Victory

IU

Er !husiasm did not die with thek

TOTAL VALE OF ROAD PLACED closing notes of the "Yellow and Blue"

AT $50,477,000 IN :FINAL LAN.
SIN REPORT
RIBSG REPORTS URBAN VALUES
City Property Listed at $29,000000
in a Report Submited
Later
Dean M. E. Cooley's appraisal of
the Detroit United Railwa3 property
is completed, and figures sul nutted to
the railway commission at Lansing
yesterday place the value of the road
in round numbers at $50,577,000. This
is the cost of reproduction of the
system, less depreciation. Included
in this value are all the urban and
interurban properties as they existed
on January 1, 1915, and also the value
of the franchises, in round numbers
$7,783,000, for the entire system as fig-
ured by F. F. Kolbe, of the depart-
ment of political economy.
A few moments after Dean Cooley
had submitted his figures, Professor
H. E. Riggs, of the engineering col-
lege, handed in his report of $29,000,-
000 as the valuation of the urban
properties of the D. U. R. This is
also the cost of the reproduction o
the system, less depreciation, and in-
cludes the urban franchise value,
which is in round numbers $6,100,000.
The two valuations are separate and
distinct, the former being ordered by
the Michigan railway commission and
the latter being a later order from
the same source after the people of
Detroit had requested it in the inter-
ests of municipal ownership.
The publication of the figures for
the urban properties of the system
is causing an intense interest to the
Detroiters, coming as they do a few
days before the purchase plan, now
before the people, is put to a vote.
The value made public yesterday is
in close accord with the appraisal of
the system made last year by Pro-
fes'sor Friday and Mr. Bemis, differ-
ing from it by less than five per cent.
The report handed to the railway
commission yesterday brings to a
close a labor extending over a period
of fifteen months. Dean Cooley, with
a staff of competent engineers and a
host of undergraduates from the en-
gineering college, has successfully
brought to completion "the most elab-
orate investigation ever undertaken
by us for the Michigan railway com-
mission." Although the appraisal
was ordered in July, 1914, the work
was not actually started until Septem-
ber, or toward the completion of the
Pere Marquette appraisal, it being de-
sired to use as far as possible the
same staff on the Detroit United ap-
praisal.
The field work was finished May 1,
1915, and the computation work July
1, 1915. During July and August the
company was given a chance to check
the inventories and unit prices. It
may be said in passing that this review
by the company increased the final
result but slightly-less than one-
quarter of one per cent. The time
since August has been consumed in
determining the franchise values.
ANN ARBOR UNION (CONPITTEE
11011D) LUNC h AT N OON T O D AY
Buffet luncheon will be served at
the lJnion at 12:15 today, when the
Ann Arbor committee in charge of the
Union campaign will have their first
meeting in concentration week, which
begins all over the country today. D.
W. Springer, '03, '05E, is chairman of
the committee, and the entire commit-
tee of 90 -men is expected this noon.
About $15,000 has been raised in town
among the alumni since the campaign
opened.

at Hill auditorium last night. It was
not the spontaneous spirit that is born
at a moment's notice and as quickly
disappears.
Instead it was of the sort that has
made Michigan known in the past-
the kind that has created miracles in
athletic circles to stand forever in
collegiate history.
A fter the wonderful demonstration
at Hill auditorium, a full thousand
students followed the band through
the downtown district and back to the
campus in a snake dance that bore no
toleration of the thoughtoftdefeat.
Ann Arbor has seen many student pa-
rades through her streets, but she
never saw one like that of last night.
The undergraduate body many times
has celebrated a football victory in
such fashion, but last evening's jubilee
was in commemoration of a moral
victory.
And then, in front of the campus,
the "Yellow and Blue" sung with re-
newed vigor, registered a vow that
Michigan is behind her eleven and
that team and student body alike are
united in a firm resolution to fight.
Let the East come on!
TWO FACULTY MEMBERS
REEIE HIGH HONORS

~etors liiayoii and( Myers
rInithited IntoAmericani
lege of Surgeons

Will
Col-

be

Dr. C. B. Kinyon, '78H, professor
of obstetrics and gynecology, and Dr.
Dean W. Myers, '99H, professor of
ophthalmology, otology, rhinology and
laryngology, both of the Homeopathic
Medical school, have left for Boston,
where, they jll be initiated into the
American College of Surgeons.
Dr. Kinyon has been connected with
the Homeopathic Medical school for
nineteen years, and Dr. Myers became
one of the faculty in 1905. Dr. Kin-
yon enjoys the distinction of being
one of the first graduates of the school,
which was founded in 1875.
The honor of being a member of
the American College of Surgeons is
one of which very few surgeons
throughout the country can boast.
Michigan may well be proud of the
members of its faculty who count
themselves among the members of the
organization. Among Michigan's rep-
resentatives are Dr. C. B. G. de Nan-
crede, Dr. Reuben Peterson, Dr. C. G.
Darling and Dr. R. B. Canfield.
Drs. Kinyon and Myers are expected
to return to Ann Arbor in a week or
ten days.
New Gymnasium- for Indiana
Bloomington, Ind., Oct. 25.-Indi-
ana's new $175,000 gymnasium has
been officially started by a huge bon-
fire built on the spot where the new
building will soon stand. The wood
for the fire was gathered by having
some 1,000 students clear the site of
the orchard which now covers it. The
new structure when completed will
have greater facilities for training
than any other college gym in Amer-
ica. There will be an immense swim-
ming pool as well as an indoor ath-
letic field for football and baseball.
Girl Aggies Compete for Prizes
Champaign, Ill., Oct. 25.-The Uni-
versity of Illinois Agricultural college
is offering two silver cups as prizes
in an essay contest in that school.
Already forty students have signed up
in the competition and as soon as the
prizes are displayed there will prob-
ably be again as many.

UNION MEN OPEN
FINAL EFFORT OF
CAPiGN TODAY
CONCENTRATION WEEK TO WIND
IP 30-DAY CANVASS OF
ALUMNI
CONFIDENT OF FINAL SUCCESS
Expect Offers of Student Aid In Get-
ting Out 30,000 Letters to Alumni
Throughout Country
Concentration Week in the Michigan
Union's national campaign for a new
clubhouse will be officially opened at
noon today when the 206 committees
engaged in the work will hold local
meetings from which reports will be
wired to the Ann Arbor office.
Plans for the closing week of the
campaign have been in the making
for the past month, and every one of
the more than 2,800 men engaged in
the country-wide canvass have prom-
ised to give their whole time to the
final effort to reach the million dollar:
mark.
Beginning today, daily committee
meetings will be in order in every
city where Union headquarters have
been established, local reports being
sent in to the central office, and the
national total being received and
read each day.
With a total of $348,524, exclusive
of student subscrptions, already
raised, the central committee realizes
that it will require a tremendous
amount of worl to bring the grand
total up to the million mark in the
next five days, but everyone connect-
ed with the national building cam-
paign is confident of the ultimate suc-
cess of the project.
Reports from the Rochester, N. Y.,
comnuittee give an idea of what the
local committeemen are doing all
over the country. A telegram rece-ived
at the Union office yesterday an-
nounced the signing of seven addi-
tional life memberships since the last
report, and the chairman of the
Rochester committee added that with
the aid of the Concentration Week
enthusiasm, he expected to report a
total of 150 life memberships, total-
ing $7,500.
It is this spirit of the final week
that is being counted upon to bring
up the grand total to the huge sum as
the aim of the 3,000 campaigners, and
every effort is being made this week
to round up those alumni of the uni-
versity who have not yet given some-
thing to the building fund.
The central office is sending out
30,000 letters to Michigan alumni to-
day, in an effort to increase the in-
terest in the gigantic task that the
'Union workers have undertaken. It is
expected that student aid will be
forthcoming in the task of getting
these letters. out this morning, as the
time of students engaged in this work
will be as valuable as actual con-
tributions to the fund.
President Harry B. Hutchins is to
speak at banquets in Kansas City and
St. Louis this week in the interests of
the Union campaign, in an effort to
stir up the enthusiasm of the commit-
tees in those cities for the final week.
Few of Crew Escape
Berlin (via London), Oct. 25.-Only
a small part of the crew of the Ger-
man cruiser Prince Adalbert, which
was sunk by a British submarine in

the Baltic on Oct. 23, have escaped,
according to an official announcement
here today. The report says that the
vessel was sunk by two torpedoes
fired while it was cruising near Midau,
near the Russian port of Riga. Its
complement was 567 men.
The statement adds that heavy
fighting by the troops of Field Mar-
shal von Hindenburg with the Rus-
sians continues near Riga.

ALLIES GAIN IN
FRESH OFFENSE
IN WEST ZONE
PARIS REPORTS RENEWAL OF AT-
TACKS ON TEUTONS IN CHAM-
PAGNE REGION
CERMAN PLANS DORGANIZED
Kaiser's Troops Regain Only Portion
of Trenches Taken by Anglo-
French
Paris, Oct. 25.-The expected re-
newal of the Anglo-French offensive
in the west has begun. The official
statement from Paris issued early this
afternoon reports the capture of an
important series of works known as
"La Courtine" in the Champagne dis-
trict. The gains are along a front of
3,800 feet and are about 750 feet in
depth. The series of trenches were
taken after a desperate hand-to-hand
encounter.
Tonight's official communique, how-
ever, admits that the Germans have
succeeded in regaining a portion of
the trenches in the Champagne lost
to the French earlier in the day, but
states that the Teutons have only suc-
ceeded in gaining a foothold in the
center of the lost positions.
The report says that the German
trenches were strongly fortified, but
that terrific artillery fire from the
French batteries paved the way for a
successful infantry attack.
Disorganize German Plans
London, Oct. 25.-High officials
here believe that the offensive of the
allies in the west, which was begun
a month ago, to be renewed again
yesterday by an important French
victory in the Champagne, has effec-
tively disorganized the German plans
in France and Belgium.
Owing to the strict censorship, de-
tails cannot be published, but it is
said that the confusion of the Ger-
mans when surprised by the allies'
attacks was appalling. The Teutons,
it is said, were forced to rely upon a
miscellaneous collection of troops in
attempting to repel the assaults.
Another Aid Raid on Venice
Rome (via Paris), Oct. 25.-Aus-
trian aeroplanes again attacked Ven-
ice today.
A squadron of three aeroplanes
sailed over the city at 2:40 o'clock this
morning, dropping a number of
bombs. The damage is reported to be
insignificant.
Bulgars Take Mountain Ridge
Berlin (via London), Oct. 25.-An
official statement made here today
tells of the capture by the Bulgarian
troops of a mountain ridge about 20
miles from the Serbian frontier. This
ridge marks the course of the princi-
pal railroad to Constantinople. The
report also claims further advances
all along the Serbian frontier.
Berlin also reports a determined
forward movement of Bulgarian
troops near the Roumanian frontier.
French Invade Bulgaria
London, Oct. 25.-The French
troops have invaded Bulgaria, accord-
ing to an announcement made here
today, and Rabrovo, one mile inside
the Bulgarian frontier, has been cap-
tured by troops of the republic under
General Sarrail.
The French troops are trying to

outflank the Bulgarian army which
crossed into Serbia at Egri Palanka.
Many Canadians Killed
Ottawa, Ont., Oct. 25.-The Cana-
dian forces fighting with the allies
have lost 2,616 men killed since they
were sent to the front, according to
a statement given out by the authori-
ties here today. The total casualties
in dead, wounded and missing were
15,192.

WHO SAYS MICHIGAN
CAN'T "COME BACK"?
1909
Michgan 3; Notre Came 11
MICHIGAN 12; PENNSYLVANIA .6
MICHIGAN 15; MINNESOTA 6
1913
Michigan 7; M.A.C. 12
MICHIGAN 33; VANDERBILT 2
MICHIGAN 43; SYRACUSE 7
MICHIGAN 17; CORNELL 0
MICHIGAN 13; PENNSYLVANIA 0
MUSICAL CLUBS HOLD SMOKER
AT UNION TOMORROW EVENING
Glee and mandolin club men hold
their first combined smoker at the
Michigan Union at 7:30 o'clock to-
morrow night instead of' Thursday
night as planned. The musical club
men made the change to allow the
combined committees of the "Bander-
tainment" to hold a pep smoker on
Thursday.
Frank Wheeler, '16E, president of
the musical clubs, desires that all men
having vaudeville talent be present at
the Union at this time and stage what-
ever acts they have. Promising mate-
rial will be coached and the best will'
be taken to the Pacific coast with the1
clubs in the spring. The list of man-
dolin club men chosen for the club
will be published in Wednesday
morning's Daily.
WORTH FIGHTS CHRES
IN, MJESTIC RIOT CASE
'915 Engineer Claims $e Had Boughtt
Ticket amid Was Going in
Legitimately
USE OF HUSH MONEY HINTED ATt
C. B. Worth, '15E, will be placed on
trial before Justice Doty this after-
noon on a charge of disorderly con-
duct, arising from an alleged attempt
to rush the doors of the Majestic the-
ater in company with several students
about two weeks ago.
Worth claims that he had a ticket
and was engaged in a strictly legiti-'
mate attempt to see the show. He is
considerably incensed over the mat-
ter and threatens to bring suit for
false arrest and imprisonment.
The statement is said to come from
a creditable source that those respon-
sible for his arrest have offered him
$25 "hush money" to keep quiet and
make no trouble.
Worth was a member of the Varsity
band while in the university. He is
now at the head of the newly-organ-
ized chemistry department of the
Dodge automobile factory in Detroit.

MICHIGAN COMES BACK
IN MONSTER PEP-FEST

"Ed" Shields, "Jim" Strasburg and
Frank Murphy Rouse Rooters
to Frenzy
SCORN ALIBIS
SPEAKERS POINT TO PAST REC-
ORDS TO SHO0W DEFEATS
LEAD TO VICTORIES
WOMEN ALSO ENTHUSE."
YOST CALLS MEETING GREATEST
HE HAS EVER SEEN AT
MICHIGAN
BY HENLEY HILL
Over in Lansing last night, they say,
M. A. C. rooters had the time of their
lives as the result of Saturday's game.
But M. A. C. rooters didn't have half
the cause for genuine exultation in
victory that Michigan men have today
over last night's "come-back" meeting
in Hill auditorium.
The lid was off the "pepper box,"
Four thousand Michigan men in shirt-
sleeves stood up, part of the fime on
their seats, and yelled, according to
old alumni, like Michigayn men never
yelled before. And 500 Michigan
women, catching the "Michigan spir-
it," earned a place as Michigan root-
ers with an enthusiasm that rivalled
that of the men.
"Ed" Shields, '94-'96L, "Jim" Stras-
burg, '02, and Frank Murphy, '12-'14L,
the pick of Michigan's alumni orators,
did most of the talking, and they got
the crowd into a pitch of enthusiasm
that drove off the last particle of
gloom.
Not a word of reproach or alibi was
uttered. Instead, the famous Michi-
gan "come-backs" in previous years
were cited to prove that early defeat
is but the impetus which a Michigan
team needs to start the struggle that
nearly always has resulted in victory.
"Jim" Strasburg was the man who
squared the M. A. C. game. "They are
having a big celebration up in Lansing
tonight," he said, "but I would te
(Continued on Page Six)
WHO BOOSTSTFIE UNION?
J.f B. Curtis
How much interest have the 6,000
students on the campus in the Mich-
igan Union's national campaign for a
new clubhouse?
Two little things which came before
the eyes of the Union administration
officers seem to answer the question,
-but in a discouraging way.
CHAPTER I.
This is concentration week for the
campaign among Michigan's 30,000
alumni to raise $1,000,000 for a mag-
nificent new clubhouse. This morning
there are 30,000 envelopes at the
Union which are to be mailed in con-
nection with this campaign. Though
the Union possesses about 2,500 mem-
bers in the active student body none
of them have agreed to help in the
task without some remuneration.
CHAPTER II.
Last Thursday afternoon at 5:00
o'clock, 100 tickets to the Saturday
night dance went on sale at the
Union counter. Before midnight 96
of the tickets had been sold, and ,the
remaining four were sold in the
morning.

-WIIAT'S GOING ON

I

TODAY
Meeting of American Chemical society,
room 151, chemical building, 4:151
o'clock.
M. Seerley speaks, Y. M. C. A., 12:30

o'clock. CONCLUSION
Ann Arbor Union committee luncheon, f.Now what do these little incidents
Union, 12:15 o'clock. point out? Just this-that the Mich-
TOMORROW igan student .is willing to take ad-
Fresh engineering assembly, room 348, vantage of the present facilities of the
engineering building, 11:00 o'clock. Union, but he is not ready to cooper-
Technic out, noon. ate with the thousands of public-spir-
Mary Antin, "They Who Knock at Our ited alumni who are working to place
Gates," auspices of Oratorical asso- at his, disposal a palatial new club-
ciation, U hall, 8:00 o'clock. house.

SEE A GREAT SHOW
BAND

HILL AUDITORIUM, NOV.3

-CER=T

ain ment

0

Five Nickels

And Help Wallop Pennsy I

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