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June 09, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-06-09

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THE DAILY
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Phones .-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

XXVI. No. 179.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JUNE 9, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ICHIGAN TRUST
"PUT M I C iI G A N FIRST" MASS
MEETING STARTS NEW 1
INSTITUTION
PLEDGE ANNUAL SUM OF $1521
IPayment to Begin Two Years After
Gradation; Contributions Range 1
From $1.00 to $20.00
s' 1
Two hundred and sixty-two seniors
have pledged themselves to give to
the university the annual sum of
1,521 by individual contributions
ranging from $1.00 to $20.00, as a re-
sult of the "Put Michigan First" se-
nior. mass meeting held yesterday
morning in University hall.
Of the pledges, 13 subscribed for
$1.00, 43 for $2.00, six for $3.00, 123
for $5.00, 70 for $10,00, three for
$20.00, and one for $25.00. The pro-
visional committee to be in charge of
the matter is composed of all the class
alumni secretaries, who will arrange
for a choice of candidates for the
board.
The Michigan Alumni Trust Fund
was unanimously passed by the 400
seniors present. Payment will not
begin for two years after the present
seniors have been graduated. From'
that time the slips signed promise to
pay some annual amount into a com-
mon treasury for the support of such
measures as a committee on which the
alumni have a majority deem best for
the future of the university.
F. F. McKinney, '16L, after calling
the meeting to order, gave a compre-
hensive explanation of the Trust Fund
plan, and called upon President Harry
B. Hutchins to speak. President
Hutchins emphasized that he was pres-
ent to influence the seniors in his of-
ficial capacity, and then explained that
the annual budget for the university
had nearly reached its maximum. He
showed wherein such a fund would
be of great value and benefit to
Michigan.
Assistant Dean W. H. Butts of the
Engineering college, expressed the
hearty support afforded the movement
from that portioh of the campus. Wil-
fred B. Shaw, secretary of the alumni
association, compAred this present
plan with that in vogue, at Yale. Pro-
fessor David Friday gave statistics de-
:scribing the amount of money which
would accrue to the university during
u stipulated period if the seniors each
contributed $10.
CAMP DAVIS PLANS COMPLETE
Squad of 20 Men Leave June 20 to Get
Ready for Official Opening
Professor C. T. Johnston announced
yesterday that all plans for the com-
ing season at Camp Davis were com-
plete. The camp equipment was ship-
ped yesterday for Lake Douglas. A
squad of about 20 men will arrive in
camp about June 20 in order to get
things in shape for the official open-
ing on July 1.
This year's teaching staff will be
as follows: Professor C. T. Johnston,
director; Asst. Professors H. B. Mer-
rick, H. H. Atwell, C. 0. Carey, and
H. Brodie; faculty instructors: J. H.
Bringhurst, J. H. Cissel, and C. 0.

Wisler; W. Bintz, teaching assistant;
student assistants, W. W. Dalzell, E.
C. Headman, W. B. James, F. A. Lewis,
A. B. McGee, H. H. Phillips, and T.
Trelfa.
The remainder of the camp popu-
lation will be as follows: Dr. C. P.
Drury, camp physician, J. Bonin, in-
strument man, five students in charge
of the mess, six or eight students to
work on camp construction work, and
105 regularly enrolled students.

"une Inlander to
Go on Sale 'Today
Editorial Disesses ance Problem;
Prize Short Story and Play
Are Features
The, June number of the Inlander
will go on sale at noon today. A fea-
ture of the issue will be an editorial
criticism of the safety-first movement
being carried out on the Huron.
"Wet June Days," one of the anony-,
mous poems, has been called by com-
petent critics the best so far pub-
lished. Other poems are "Irkutsk," by
Maxwell E.Pitkin, '16L, "A Flirtation",
and several others by men of the rhe-
toric faculty.
"The Manuscript," by Emily Mack,
'19, is the prize-winner in the Stylus
siort story contest. "Romance of a
Stone-cutter," by M. Muriel Tyson, '16,
is another short story, while Mary
Langhorne, '16, has written a short,
humorous play called "Eden Again."
H1. B. Teegarden, '17, has written a
"Fact article" about the Student Coun-
cil; an essay on student conversation
is the work of Ralph M. Carson, '17.
Werner Schroeder, '16L, has an ar-
ticle discussing the present athletic
situation at Michigan.
.Mlusic Students
T o Give Recital
Only Adiranced Students of the School
of Music to Participate in
Today's Musical
This afternoon at 4:15 o'clock in
Hill auditorium a public recital will
be given by students of the Univer-
sity School of Music. This will be the
firsL student recital to be held in Hill
auditorium and the ones who will ap-
pear at this time are advanced stu-
dents who were chosen on account of
the excellence of their work.
The program to be offered is an
interesting one and includes vocal
numbers by Chase B. Sikes and Rob-
ert R. Dieterle who were soloists with
the Glee Club, and instrumental num-
bers by Elsie Lincoln and Altha Hef-
felbower, two young pianists whose
graduating recitals at the School of
Music this spring were well received.
The remainder of the program con-
sists of vocal and piano numbers
which will be given by students who
have already distinguished themselves
in musical activities.
The general public is coidially in-
vited to attend.
PROF. LORCH IS ON COMMITTEE
OF ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE
Professor Emil Lorch of the Archi-
tectural department, has been appoint-
ed to the office of advisory committee
on education of the American Institute
of Architects. The advisory committee
is a newly created office, Professor
Lorch ha been for three years a mem-
her of the committee of education.
TOTEM CLUB ELECTS OFFICERS
FOR ENSUING YEAR AT BANQUET
At the last meeting of the Totem
club held a the Cutting cafe last
evening the following officers were
elected for the ensuing year. Presi-
dent, Walter C. Gernt, '17E; vice-presi-
dent, Marshall Troester, '17; secretary,
Gerald Gabriel, '18; treasurer, Clar-
ence Kretzchmar, '18; and sergeant-at-
arms, Edwin Snyder, '19.

CHOOSE OFFICIALS
Dr. May, Prof. Boak and Homer Heath1
to Be Judges; "Hal" Smith and
")laully" Are Starters
j lPRIZES AN I) CUPS EXHIBITED
Names of the judges and starters for
the Boat club regatta races to be held
on the Huron river Saturday after-
noon were announced yesterday as
follows: Judges, Dr. George May, Prof.
A. E. Boak, and Homer Heath; start-
ers, "Hal" Smith, '16, and "Maully"
Maulbetsch, '17P.
The courses for the canoe and swim-
ming races were measured and laid
out yesterday, red can buoys being
used to mark the length of the courses
and indicate the turns. A large tent
is being put up on the bank near the
first bend in the river for the conve-
nience of contestants in the swimming1
events.
Prizes and cups for the winners,
of the various races will be. placed
on exhibition in Huston Brothers' win-
dow today. Additional entries for the
canoe events may be made by calling
Irving S. Toplon, '17, 682-J. Those
wishing to enter the swimming con-
tests call F. J. Wurster, '17, 374.
The various campus societies are al-
ready at work buiidng their floats for
.the ev cain rogramn and eery effort
is being made to make the event a
success.
FEAR ANTI-AMERICAN SPIRT
Consuls in Mexican Cities Apprehen-
sive of Personal Safety
Washington, June 8 .-Although con-
firmation is lacking to official chan- I
nels of the reported attack by a Mexi-
can mob on the American consulate at
Chihuahua City, the state department
late this afternoon was advised that
American citizens there are extremely
apprehensive of anti-American riots
and are desirous of leaving for the
border by the first train available.
It was learned authoritatively that
the real reason for the return to this
country several weeks ago of Marion
Letcher, the American consul at Chi-
huahua City, as well as the consuls
at Dui'ango and other cities in nor-
thern Mexico, lay in the growing tide
of anti-American sentiment, although
at the time the excuse given was that
the state department had arranged for
a conference of the consuls on the
border.
SENIOR EN GIN E ER S BANQUET
Prof. Friday Is Principal Speaker; Cab-
aret Features Introduced
What proved to be, in the words of
Prof. David Friday, "one of the finest
banquets ever', was given by the last-
year engineers at the Allenel hotel last
night. An eight-course feast, inter-
spersed with special cabaret features,

RECEIVE DETAILS
French Still Hold Trenches to Right
and Left of Lost Fort; Germans
Fail to Advance

A'T AC 1 11:;1K UI iiFR

FIRE

Paris, June 8.-Details of the cap-
ture of Fort Vaux by the Germans
tverc received in Paris this afternoon.
The fort had been cut off from the
rest of the defensive lines so far as
receiving reinforcement, ammunition
or supplies was concerned for five
days, and the garrison of the fort was
exhausted by the continual fight into
which the Germans constantly were
,tble to bring new forces. For some
hiours before the surrender, the fort
vas cut off from all communication
with the rear, even with the trenches
only 300 yards in the rear.
The French still hold the trenches
to the right and left of the fort and
their line runs immediately at the rear
of the fort itself. All efforts of the
Germans to enlarge their success by
including the terrain surrounding the
fort have so far failed.
Today the Germans directed their
attention to the sector of ihe Thiau-
nwont Farm southwest of Fort Douau-
mo:t, where they dir eted successive
atl aks under cover of heavy artillery
fire against the French line on both
sides of the farm. All of these attacks
broke down under French fire.
Last Jinute News
Told in Brief
Amsterdam, via London, June 8.-
Sustained firing was heard to seaward
at Flushing this morning. A light-
house keeper saw four warships
.teaming toward the Belgian coast.
Paris, June 8.-The bill providing
for more daylight was passed today.
Clocks will be advanced one hour from
June 14 until October 1.
New York, June S-Thirty were in-
jured here today in an elevated road
wrlision which was followed by fire.
Sonne of the injured probably will die.
A seven-car train plunged into a
train that had come to a halt, and by
a strange freak the car of the moving
train climbed on top of the rear car
of the halted train, instead of tele-
~i (P :ping.
1 oIIdon, June S.-Oiie warrant offi-
cr and 11 men, survivors of the cruis-
er Hampshire, which went down off
the Orkney Islands with Earl Kitch-
ener and members of his staff aboard,
have been washed ashore on a raft,
according to an announcement by the
admiralty tonight.
Amsterdam, June 8.-The German
admiralty today admitted that the bat-
tle cruiser Luetdow, of 26,000 tons,
and the small cruiser Rostock, of 4,900
tons, were lost in the North sea battle
of May 31. Both vessels had been
claimed in England to have been de-
stroyed and these claims had been
previously denied in Berlin.

Gargoyle To l'e
Out T his Noon'
Last Number Takes Many Hard Cracks
at Numerous Campus
Institutions
Many hard cracks at campus institu-
tions are taken in the Commencement
number of the Gargoyle, which will
go on sale this noon. An attack is
made on the policy of -awarding nu-
meral caps to class team managers.
Football, baseball, track, the Union,
the Inlander, and the Women's Gar-
goyle are given a satirical review in
the "Passing Show of 1916."
Not all the contents are adverse
criticism; the hall of fame, a new
feature in the Gargoyle, is the result of
a serious attempt to pick the real lead-
ers of the Michigan campus.
Although there are enough features1
to assure an exceptional demand for
the magazine, a limited edition of
only 1300 will be put out in order to
wind up the sale rapidly and so close
the year's business.
IH A IESPEARE CLASS GIVES
"MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING"
Shakespeare's comedy, "Much Ado
About Nothing," was given last night
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall by the
class in Shakespearean reading. The{
production was not a costume recital
although the parts were given from
memory.
The cast, which was changed in
every scene in order to get in all tht
members of the class, was announced
before each scene.
WHlAT'S GOING ON
Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity-Fair and warmer.
TODAY
4:05 o'clock-Baseball, Michigan vs.
M. A. C., at Ferry field.
4:14 o'clock-Public student recital,
Hill auditorium.
9:0 o'clock-Regatta ball, Armory.
TOMORROW
Afternoon and evening-The An-
nual.Boat club regatta,
3:00 o'clock-Baseball, Michigan vs.
M. A. C. at Ferry field.
U-NOTICES
The Michiganensian staff banquet
will be held tonight at 6:00 o'clock at
the Union.
Students intending to transfer from
the literary college to a professional
department should hand in their names
at once to Registrar Hall in order to
have the transcripts sent early to the
chosen department.
The cil engineering society will
cst ballots for officers today in the
society room.
The Varsity Band will meet at U-hall
at 4:00 o'clock for the M. A. C. game,
wearing their khaki uniforms.
Last chance for J-its to pay their
class dues will be from 1:30 to 3:15
o'clock this afternoon in the library.
Men wishing to work on the editor-
ial and reportorial side of The Wol-
verine this summer are requested to
call Verne Burnett at phone 1283-M
between 12:30 and 1:30 o'clock any
afternoon this week. For the business
side call Verne Sellers at the same
hour, at phone 1460.

JINT COMMITTE
ITOSESSION TIES TO
REPUBLICANS AND MOOSERS AT-
TEMPT TO AGREE ON
CANDIDATE
HAVE SLIM HOPE OF SUCCESS
Progressives Are pitermined to Nom-
imate Roosevelt; GO0. P. Leaders
Firm in Opposition
Chicago, June 8.-Committees from
the Republican and Progressive con-
ventions are engaged tonight in a
final effort to harmonize the differ-
ences of the two parties and to agree
up n a common presidential candidate.
At a late hour, the two committees
were still in session, and nothing defi-
nite had so far come from their delib-
crating.
The move for harmony came at the
close of the day, which had seen fur-
ther developments indicating the
strength of the movement to nomin-
ate Associate Justice Charles Evans
Hughes in the Republican convention,
and when the gathering at the Coli-
seum adjourned for the night it was
with the understanding that the nom-
inating speeches would begin at 11:00
o'clock tomorrow and that the ballot-
ing for presidential candidates would
start upon their conclusion.
Both Progressives and Republicans
entered the so-called "harmony" con-
ference tonight with little hope of be-
ing able to reach any agreement in
regard to a presidential nominee. The
Bull Moose were prepared to stand for'
Colonel Roosevelt and the Republicans
were just as equally determined that
the ex-President should not be nom-
inated in the G. O. P. convention. The
only basis for a compromise on a
presidential candidate lay in the possi-
bility that Colonel Roosevelt himself
might communicate his wishes to Pro-
gressive representatives in the joint
conference. It is certain now that
only a word from Colonel Roosevelt
himself can prevent his nomination in
the Bull Moose convention, and it will
have to be definite and emphatic.
Colonel Wants Unity
Colonel Roosevelt's message to Wil-
liam P. Jackson of Maryland, national
committeeman of that state, which was
made public at Oyster Bay, had much
to do with giving a brighter turn to
the sitnation in Chicago. Colonel
Roosevelt appealed in that telegram
for both parties to unite, and his em-
phasizing of the necessity above all
things to eliminate President Wilson
from the White House raised the Re-
publican hopes for harmony and par-
tially dampened the spirit of some of
the Progressives. Colonel Roosevelt's
telegram was immediately construed
in Republican circles as a clear inti-
mation that he regarded the'defeat of
Mr. Wilson as the most important con-
sideration, 'that he was prepared to
make personal sacrifices if necessary,
and that he would not run on a thir(
ticket. Progressives of the radical
type who have been insisting that they
must nominate Colonel Roosevelt, were
not pleased with the communication,
and it was apparent tonight that Mr.
Roosevelt would have to speak more
directly and more definitely to them if
he is to prevent his nomination on
the Bull Moose ticket.

Republicans Clear Decks
In two sessions today of the Repub-
lican convention, Senator Harding of
Ohio was made permanent chairman,
rules were adopted, the action of the
national committee in credential dis-
putes was approved, and the platfqrm
was adopted, which includes approval
of woman suffrage but leaves to each
state the privilege of giving to or.
withholding from women the vote.

made thede nner one to be long re-
membered by the technical men. Rome, June 8.-Semi-official assur-
Professor Friday was the principal ane was given today that the menace
speaker of the evening. H. H. Phil- of an Austrian invasion had been
lips, class president, and Don A. Smith, averted, and that the pressure on
last year's president, were the other the Italian center is gradually dimin-
speakers. ishing.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

BASEBALL TO DAY

M. A. C. vs. Michigan

BA LL SATURDAY
BSBJUNE 10TH
M. A. C. vs. Michigan
FERRY FIELD, 2:45 P. M. Admission 50c
ATHLETIC COUPON, NUMBER 28

FERRY FIELD, 4:05 P. M.

Admission 50c

ATHLETIC COUPON, NUMBER 27

-,fir____________________

The Most Daring
The Most Satirical
The Funniest
The Frothiest
The Last-and Best,

TODAY

AT NOON

I

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