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June 08, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-06-08

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TH~E lDAILY
NEWS OF TIHE WORLD AND
THIE CAMPUS

IF I
09,
jam( y i
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Phones:--lgtoril 2414
fl'isiness 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

_. ._.._

VOL...XXVI. No. 178.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN; ;THURSDAY, JUNE 8, 1916.

PRIZES TO EXTENT
OF $50 OFFLRED
[N CLUB REGATTA
BRONZE MEDALS STRUCK FOR
FIRST P'LACE IN
RACK~S
COMMITTEEMEN MADE PUBLIC
Clips Offered for Winners in Marathon,
Float and Fraternity Booth
Contests,
Prizes amounting to approximately
$50 have been provided for the suc-
cessful contestants in the annual boat
club regatta to be held Saturday af-
ternoon and evening on the Huron
river. For the first places in the canoe
and swimming races special bronze
medals are being struck, engraved on
the obverse side with the insignia of
the club and on the reverse with the
event and the name of the winner.
Ribbons denoting second and third
places will be presented to the other
successful entrants.
A silver cup, now in possession of
Sphinx will be awarded to the society
entering the best decorated float. This
is a two year cup, and may be per-
manently retained by any society win-
ning it two successive years. The year
before it was in the hands of Druids.
Another cup, presented by Huston
Brothers for the marathon, is now in
possession of Les Voyageurs, who have
\held it for the past two years. pne
more successful entry will nlear. that
the pup will remain permanently in
0 their hands. Several entries have
been received for this event.
The third cup is presented by Tink-
er and company and is given to the
(Continued on Page Six)
EXPLAINS TICKET QUESTION
Registrar Hall Tells Seniors of Com-
nieneement Pay Shortage
To answer the questions of the se-
niors who have been wondering why
they have been unable to secure more
than one ticket for their friends for
Commencement Day exercises, Reg.-
istrar A. G. Hall gave out the follow-
ing statement yesterday:
"We are saving for the seniors and
their friends 4,000 of the 4,600 seats
in Hill auditorium. One thousand two
hundred of these will be used by the
senior classes themselves, while the
one ticket which has been given to
@gch graduate already makes the to-
JAI number 2,400. Four hundred tick-
ets are being reserved for the alumni,
while 200 more have been set aside for
the local people. This leaves 1,600
tickets which we plan to give to the
seniors as fast as we can pass upon
the lists which they have given us.
{'The faculty t the number of 400
wili sit upon the stage tp make way
for the seniors in the body of the
auditorium, and we are making every
effort to take care of the families and
friends of the members of the gradu-
ating classes."
FORMAL RECEPTION EXPECTED
TO PRECEDE SENIOR RECEPTION
According to plans just completed
the senior reception to be held Mon-
dy, a ec 2, will be preceded by a
forrnnd reception during which all

those present will pass down the re-
ceiving line formed by members of the
faculty and class officers. The grand
march will start at 9:30 o'clock, and
the dance will continue until 3:00
o'clock. A few tickets still remain un-
sold and may be secured by calling
Philip C. Lovejoy, '16.
T'flpnl Club Holds Banquet Tonight
TM Totenm club will hold its an-
nuwd spring dinner and election of
officers tonight at the Cutting Cafe
at C:00 o'clock. Speeches will be
made by both the retiring officers and
the new officors, while Kenneth Keyes,
'17, will act as toastmuaster.
iune Inlander Not Out Till Friday
The June n;inber of they Inlander
will not make its appearance today,
but will go on sale Friday noon. This
was to have been the original date
but was changed hrause the editors.
believed they could have the book off
+ha rne I ~at nin

t
e
x

Pre. I 1. Cuchn
Prof. I . II Ut1"cIIIIIM
1,,-; fJ)tani D eaur W. Et
1;uttS.
All seI ilts are expec led to Ire
present. Senior ell21.st s inrf-
lug at 11 :40O'clock have 11een'
excused hti order to perviah gen-*
eral attenidance. *

Last Mlinute News
Told in lrief
Berlin, via London, June 7.-An of-
ficial communication issued today says
the Germans rescued 175 British after
the Gutland battle,
Paris, June 7.-The French destroy-
er Fantassin has been sunk in a col-
lision. The crew was rescued.
Amsterdam, via London, June -
The Telegraaf says that a German de-
stroyer struck a mine and went own
off Geebrugge on May 31.
New York, June 7.-Artur Warren
Waite obtained a stay of execution on
an appeal notice filed this afternoon
by Attorney W. R. Deuel. Waite, who
was sentenced to die the week of July
10 for the murder of John E. Peck,
his millionaire father-in-law, is op-
posed to the appeal, Deel said.
280 HIGH SCHOOLS ACCREDITED
University Receives 169 Applications
for Inspection During Year
More than 280 public high schools
and private or parochial schools in
Michigan are now recognized as ac-
credited preparatory schools by the
university. .
During the past scholastic year ap-
plications for inspection were received
by the faculty committee on diploma
schools from 169 schools in the state,
of which number 130 came from the
131 schools whose terms of affiliation
with the university had expired with
the opening of the present college year.
HEALTH SERVICE PROVES ITS
WORTH THROUGH STATISTICS
During the past school year the Uni-
versity Health Service has treated a
total of 22,724 cases for ailments of
every description. During the month
of May alone a total of 3205 cases was
registered at the Health Service, of
which 912 were women. The greatest
number of cases was received in
March, while the last trouble was re-
ported in April. A general average
shows that each student in the Uni-
versity has received medical attention
four times during the academic year.
The pharmacy, during the same
length of time, has handled 3,978 cases.
exclusive of all solid preparations used
by the Health Service.
OJLISTEAD AND CARSON TAKE
XENORAIf COMPETITION, PRIZES
Frank I. Olmstead, '16, and R. M.
Carson, '17,have been awarded the
two $100 prizes for the best essays
in the Menorah prize competition of
which Rabbi Leo M. Franklin of De-
troit, Prof. R. M. Wenley, and Prof.
I. L. Sharfman were the judges. Olm-
stead's subject was "The Prophetic
Religion of Israel Before the Exile,"
while Carson wrote on "The Jewish
Conception of Immortality."
Dixie Club Holds Annual Election
At the last meeting of the Dixie
club held Tuesday evening, the follow-
ing officers were elected for the com-
ing year: President, P. Schmidt, '17;
vice-president, B. Penniman, '17; sec-
retary, S. Geisenberger, '17; treasurer,
A. J. Rogoski, '18.
Medical State Board Exams Held Soon
The State Board examinations for
medical students will be held in this

city on June 19, 20, and 21, in the
medical building. These examinations,
which are under the supervision of
the State Medical board, are open to
lil 1eninrs. 11

SENIORS GATHER
THIS MORNINGFOR
BIGMASSMEETING
'IICH(IAN ALUMNI TRUST FUN
TO BE MAIN POINT AT
ASSEMilBLY
F, F. MCKINNEY '16 L.PRESIDES
Effinger, Shaw, and Friday Voice Ap-
proval of Plan Adopted by
Class Presidents
The "Put Michigan First,' senior
mass meeting will take place this
morning at 11:00 o'clock in University
hall.
F. F. McKinney' '16L, has been ap-
pointed by the senior class presidents.
to act as chairman and explain the
Michigan Alumni Memorial Fund
which is to be the chief feature of
the meeting. President Harry B.
Hutchins will discuss the advisability
of such a plan, W. B. Shaw is to com-
pare it with that in vogue in several'
of the eastern universities. Prof.1
David Friday is to give statistics con-1
cerning the matter, Assistant Dean W.
(Continued on Page Six)
SHAESEEN REAING
TO N ANGEL H
Prof. Trueblood's Class of 7 to Give1
"31 ich A do Ablout No(thing"
it 8:00 o'Clockt
Prof. Trueblood's class in Shakes-
pearean reading will give a platform
recital of the comedy, "Much Ado
About Nothing," this evening at 8:00!
o'clock in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
The play will be open to the public
and no admission will be be charged.
The cast will be changed every scenet
in order to get in the 75 members ofr
the class. The cast will be announcedi
before each scene.I
The production will not be a cos-f
tume recital. The parts will be givens
from memory with full expression, and
with as much action as possible.-
Two plays each semester are givent
by the class in Shakespearean read-t
ing and all have been largely attended.
The first one this semester was given
in April just before the spring vca-f
tion. The people attending this eve-
ning's performance are requested to1
be seated promptly at 8:00 o'clock in
order not to disturb the action by
coming in late. t
PICK SENIOR GUARD OF HONOR
Names of All Men to Escort Board of
Regents Not Made Public

*4 * .. ** ** ** UGHES
SENIORS ATTENTION! H C I
All ,iijifoEs aPre requested to UBLI
*wearl their. caps and lgowns on 1* H P BI
*Thmrsla y instead of Friday ~ Ei
thlis week to fur~ther interest inini
*the "Pat 3ii~i-an First;" moiss *
Ineetinig. *

JAMES B. AN{xELL, II., 16
S II. HI. PHILIPS, 'loF
R. S. WESTROf100 i 'k

1). M. CLARKE, '1611
L. I). SCA L011, '16L
W. R. MEADE, 161)
. . BROWN, 16, i
1L1 1. LOWS, '161.

*
*
:
*
*

*

* * * * * * * * *

Storms do Great
Damage in West
110 Lives Lost and Heavy Property
Damage Reported; Arkansas
Hit Hardest
St. Louis, June 7.-With communi-
cation still cut off in many sections it
has been estimated that 110 persons
lost their lives in storms which swept
over five states Monday night and
yesterday. Scores of persons were in-
jured and property damage was heavy.
The toll of storm was heaviest in Ar-
kansas where several towns were al-
most completely wiped out. Missouri
was second in the lead, 30 deaths be-
ing reported from the district visited
by the storm. Scarcely a town in
Arkansas escaped damage in the
twister.
GARGOYLE OUT FRIOAY NOON
Commencement Number to Contain
Many Novel Features
_
The Commencement number of the
Gargoyle will be out Friday noon.
The cover is a checker board design
in three colors by Lamar M. Kish-
lar, '17E. A new feature is a hall of
fame, consisting of six members, two
senior laws, two senior lits, one sen-
ior lit woman, and one member of the
faculty. These six have been chosen
because they stand as true leaders on
the campus. Pictures of these personsl
will be printed, and reasons will be
given for their election to the hall of
fame.
"The Senior's Farewell" is a double-
page cartoon by Harry Leach, '16,
who sketched "The Campus Under
Military Training" cartoon that made
the Military Training Gargoyle so
popular. In the "Senior's Farewell"
both fiction and reality are humor-
ously shown. The frontispiece, by
the same artist, is "A Story Without
Words.
GLENN M. COULTER ELECTED '161
ALUMNI SECRETARY-TREASURER
At the last senior lit class meeting
of the year, held yesterday afternoon,
the following alumni representatives
were elected: Glenn M. Coulter, sec-
retary and treasuer; Philip J. Love-
joy, and Jemima Wenley. Following
a spirited discussion regarding he dis-
position of the athletic funds of the
class, $25.00 was put at the disposal
of those in charge of girls' athletics.
(argoyle Staff Held Banquet Tuesday
The last Gargoyle staff dinner of
the year was held Tuesday night at
the Renellen Hospice. W. A. P. John,
'16, was toastmaster; talks were given
by Edward Maguire, '16, Prof. W. G.
Stoner, John A. Heist, '16, H. Kirk
White, '17, newly elected business
manager; Harry Leach, '16E, and R. E.
Folz, '17, newly elected managing edi-
tor. Nineteen watch charms were pre-
sented to members of the editorial and
business staffs for service during the
past year.
Prof. Allen Addresses Fresh Assembly
The fresh engineers heard Prof.
John R. Allen, of the mechanical en-
gineering department, at their final
assembly yesterday. Professor Allen,
who will have charge of this class
next year, gave them words of advice
as to how they should conduct them-
selves as sophomores.
It was announced that all class dues

not paid by the first meeting next
fall will h increasedl fifty ner cent.

ivw Students on
Senate Committee.
Faculty Student Affairs Body Increas-
ed by Presidents of Student and
Woman's Judiciary Councils
In order to give to the members of
the senate committee on student af-
fairs the student point of view on all
questions affecting the campus which
this committee must meet, two stu-
dents, the president of the Student
Council and the president of the
Woman's Judiciary Council, have
been asked to join this senate com-
mittee. They will start their active
work next fall.
Professor Strauss, chairman of the
committee, believes that the move is
a good one and that it will aid the
committee in making decisions relative
to the students. It is the first attempt
ever made to place students upon this
body and came as a direct result of a
request from Henry C. Rummel, '16L,
now president of the Student Council,
who saw in it an opportunity for the
students to gain better representation
than they now have.
500 SEE THREE IRISH PLAYS
Oratorical Association Members Give
One Act Productions in U-Hall
Before an audience of about 500;
the three one-act Irish plays "Shad-
ows of the Glen," "Riders to the Sea,;"
and "Land of Heart's Desire" were
given last night in University Hall
by the members of the class in play
production under the auspices of the
Oratorical association.
N. Earl Pinney, '16, gave an inter-
esting preliminary talk on the three
plays and on the Irish theater of the
present day.
"Land of Heart's Desire," by W. B.
Yeats, was the first play given. "Ri-
ders to the Sea," a tragedy by John
M. Synge, was the second play. The
last play presented, "The Shadow of
the Glen," also by Synge, was of a
humorous type
WHAT'S GOING ONj

CONSERVATIVE OPINION
HE WILL BE NAMED
THIRD BALLOT

SAYS
BY

PRICE FIVE CENTS
BOOM GROWS STEAWILY IN
CAN CONVENTION; LEADERS
HIS NOMINATION INEVITABLE

COLONEL MAINTAINS SILENCE
Followers Claim le Will Not Indorse
Hughes IUniess Latter Satisfies
"A mericanism" Issue
Chicago, June 7.-Charles Evans
Hughes will be nominated for Presi-
dent by the Republican convention un-
less present indications are complete-
ly upset.
Leaders of the Republican party who
are familiar with every detail of the
situation and who are slow to make
predictions, asserted tonight for the
first time that Mr. Hughes will be
named by the Republican convention.
They added that nothing could pre-
vent his selection. Several of them
ins'isted he would be named 'by the
third ballot and possibly on the sec-
ond roll call.
The Progressive convention, on the
other hand, intends to go forward with
its plan of nominating Colonel Roose-
velt, probably by Friday at the latest.
Colonel Roosevelt's attitude toward
the nomination or toward Justice
Hughes as the Republican nominee is
still a matter of doubt. The entire
situation so far as the prospects of
the Republican party for victory are
concerned now revolve about Colonel
Roosevelt If he accepts the Progres-
sive nomination and refuses to support
a Republican nominee all hopes of
Republican success against President
Wilson will have disappeared.
So far as can be ascertained Colonel
Roosevelt has not taken any of the
Progressive or Republican leaders into
his confidence as to what his course
will be. Colonel Roosevelt is not yet
convinced that he cannot obtain the
nomination from the Republican con-
vention and he is prepared to play
his cards up to the very last. Mr.
Roosevelt and his followers are en-
gaged now in a final effort to force
(Continued on Page Six)
GIVE PUBLIC RECITAL TODAY
School of Music Students to Appear
at Hill Auditorium Today
This afternoon at 4:15 o'clock the
following students of the University
School of Music will appear in a pub-
lie recital to which the general public
is cordially invited.
Etude, ....................Godard.
Prelude and Fugue,..........Bach.
Alxora Crowcombe.
Fifth Air and Variation (Theme de
Weigl)...............Danca.
Carolyn Clapp Grossman
The Spirit Flower, Campbell Tipton,
Florence Paddock
Melody,.....................Bloch.
Mildred Sutton.
Tarantella ................... Liszt.
Earl S. Epps.
Romance,................ Svendsen.
Clarence Post.
STILL HAVE MANY JOBS LEFT
AT "Y" EmPtOYLENT BURE AU
There are still many positions to be
obtained for this summer by students
at the "Y" employment bureau. There
are positions open for two or three
men to act as "camp leaders" during
Commencement Week and the week
after. Students who wish these posi-
tions should see Philip Lovejoy, '16,
immediately at the university Y. M.
C. A.
Electrical Engineers Hold Election
The American Institute of Electrical
Engineers held their annual election
last evening. The following officers

were chosen for the coming year:
Chairman, A. N. Clark, '17E; secre-
tary, F. E. Richardson, '17E; treasur-
er, H. B. Bassett, '17E.
Hesse to Give Lecture This Morning
Dr. B. C. Hesse will lecture on "The
Future of the Chemist's and the Chem-
ical Engineer's Profession" in room
303 of ,the Chemistry building this
morning at 11:00 o'clock.

Weather forecast for Ann.
vicinity: Probably rain.

Arbor and

The senior guard of honor
traditional duty it is to form an
for the Board of Regents on

whose
escort
Com-

mencement Day has been selected by
the various senior class presidents.
Members of the senior lit class who
have been chosen will meet this after-
noon at 4:00 o'clock on Ferry, field
under the leadership of Louis Rei-
mann to rehearse for the drill. Mem-
bers of the guard have all been noti-
fied personally and will be expected to
present themselves at the time ap-
pointed. The personnel of the group
will be made public soon.
SENIOR SING TO BE HELD ON
WEDNESDAY NIGHT AT 7:00
Due to the weather, the regular Wed-
nesday night senior sing was post-
poned until next Wednesday night at
7:00 o'clock at the campus bandstand.
Leader U. S. Wilson announced yes-
terday that this would be the last se-
nior songfest before the formal sings
of Commencement week. The affair
is purposely scheduled for the midst
of the examination period to give
campus "studes" a bit of relaxation.
War Relief Committee Meets Tonight
An open meeting of the War Relief
committee will be held in Harris hall
today at 3:00 o'clock.
The purpose is to give people inter-
ested in the work carried on by the
committee some information of what
the result is at the front. Mrs. L. P.
Hall will read letters received from
Eunn.

11:00 o'clock-Dr. B. C. Hesse lec-
tures on "The Future of the Chemist's
and the Chemical Engineer's Profes-
sion," room 303, Chemistry building.
11:00 o'clock-Mass meeting for all
senior classes, Hill auditorium. '
3:00 o'lock-Senior lit class meet-
ing, Tappan hall.
3:00 o'clock--War Relief Committee,
open meeting, Harris hall.
7:30 o'clock--Meeting of the Com-
merce .club.
7:30 o'clock-Meeting of the Pontiac
club, Union.
8:00 o'clock-Public recital of "Much
Ado About Nothing," by the class in
Shakespearean Reading, Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall.
TOMORROW
9:00 o'clock-Regatta ball, Armory.
U-NOTICES
TIhe river party planned by the
young people of the Church of Christ
for Thursday evening has been post-
poned until Friday evening at 5:00
o'clock.
Senior laws pay class dues today
from 9:00 to 11:00 and from 1:00 to
3:00 in the north corridor of the law
building.
All seniors having ordered canes
must get ;them by Friday at Haller and
Furrler's jewelry store. Canes will be
sold after the 9th without previous
order.
Student's Christian Association will
elect a president for the coming year
at an open election to be at Newberry
Hall this afternoon at 5:00 o'clock.

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