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June 07, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-06-07

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THE DAILY
NEWS OF TIE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

CHIGAN0

Phones:- torial 2414
Poisiness 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY 'T
NEW YORK SUN

_

PRICE FIVE C

VOL. XXVI. No. 177.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7, 1916.

-,... >

THIRD PARTY NOW.
DEPENDS ON STAND
OF CDLHOOSEVELT
T. IMS LIEUTENANTS FAIL TO DE-
LAY HIS BULL MOOSE
NOMINATION
PROBABLY BE NAMED FRIDAY
Hughes Leads in Race for Republican
Nomination; Opponents Fall to
Get Together
Chicago, June 6.-Whether or not
there is to be a third party ticket in
the field and a repetition of the politi-
cal history of 1912 now depends en-
tirely upon Colonel Roosevelt.
The lieutenants of the Progressive
party have worked hard to bring about
a delay in the Bull Moose nomination
until the Republicans have had an
opportunity to act. Mr. Roosevelt's
lieutenants have failed in their ef-
forts, and tonight practically "threw
up the sponge."
They have agreed to proceed to
the nomination of Colonel Roosevelt,
(Continued on Page Eight)
PLANS FORC SENIOR LIT
CLSS DAY COMPLETED
Exercises to Be Given Tuesday, June
27 at 1:00 o'Clock, in Hill
Auditorium
Plans for senior lit class day exer-
cises in Hill auditorium, scheduled for
Tuesday, June 27, at 10:00 o'clock,
have practically been completed. The
program has been arranged as fol-
lows:
President's address, James B. An-
gell, II.; class history, Martha Gray;
class poem, Waldemar A. P. John;
class prophecy, Eleanor Stalker; class
oration,*N. Earl Pinney. Several mu-
sical numbers will be given during
the course of the program.
At 8:00 o'clock Tuesday evening
will occur the annual Senior Promen-
ade on the campus in which all the
senior classes of the university will
participate. Through an error the
printed programs give the Senior Re-
ception as following the promenade.
The reception, as previously an-
nounced, will be held Monday evening
in the Armory.,
Details regarding Class Day ar-
rangements will be discussed at the
meeting of the senior lit class this
afternoon.
GIRLS' GLEE CLUB ELECTS
F rence Paddock, '17, Chosen Presi-
'dent; Give Annual Serenade in Fall
Florence Paddock, '17, was elected
president of the Girls' Glee club for
the coming year at a meeting held at
Barbour gymnasium yesterday. Other
officers chosen were: Vice-president,
Christine Stringer, '17; treasurer,
Ruth Butler, '17; secretary, Helen
Bush; librarian, Hilda Flink, '18.
It was decided that the annual se-
renade would be given in the fall in-
stead of after the spring concert as
has been the custom.
PROF. J. R. ALLEN TO TALK
T1O FRESH ENGINEERS TODAY

Prof. John R. Allen, of the mechani-
cal engineering department, will be
the speaker at the last fresh engineer
assembly this semester at 11:00 o'clock
today in room 348, engineering build-
ing. Professor Allen, who will have
charge of the assemblies of this class
next year, will speak to the sophs-
elect of the system and organization
of the soph engineer classes.

MALCOLM MacLEAN, '16
Who plays the part of Father Hart in
the Irish play, "The Land of Heart's
Desire," tonight.
BORATOS WILL PRESENT
IRISH PLAYS TONi T
Fhial Dress Rehearsal Runs Smoothly;
N. Earl Pinney to Give Pre-
liminary Talk
With everything running smoothly,
the final dress rehearsal of the three
Irish plays to be given tonight at 8:00
o'clock in University hall by members
of the Oratorical association gave
promise of being a finished production.
The dialogue and excellent acting
gave an absorbing interest to the plays
of Synge and Yeats.
The three sketches, which are recog-
nized as among the best one-act Irish
plays, are not only of educational value
but are interesting in being unusual
in subject and in the manner of pres-
entation.
The plays produce an atmosphere of
old Ireland, portraying Irish peasant
(Continued on Page Eight)
Announce .Patrons
for Senior Party
List Includes Many Prominent Mem-
bers of Faculty; Only Few Tickets
Still Unsold
Announcement was made yesterday
of the patrons and patronesses for the
Senior Reception to be held during
Commencement week, by Philip Love-
joy, '16, general chairman of the com-
mittee. The list is as follows:
President Harry B. Hutchins and
Mrs. Hutchins, Regent Junius E. Beal
and Mrs. Beal, Dean John R. Effinger
and Mrs. Effinger, Registrar Arthur G.
Hall and Mrs. Hall; Dean M. E. Cooley
and Mrs. Cooley; Dean Henry M. Bates
and Mrs. Bates; Dean Victor C.
Vaughan and Mrs. Vaughan, Mr. and
Mrs. F. J. Jordan; Professor Louis
Straus and Mrs. Straus, Professor A.
H. White and Mrs. White, Treasurer
B. A. Campbell and Mrs. Campbell.
Programs for this affair will be em-
bossed leather vanity cases for the
ladies, and leather card cases for the
men. Only 15 tickets remained yes-
terday noon of the 150 put on sale
Monday morning. There will be no
more public sales, but any person
wishing a ticket may obtain it from
ane one of the committeemen.
OFFICERS' DRILL CORPS TO
HOLD LAST DRILL TONIGHT
Major C. E. Wilson will hold the
last Officers' Drill corps drill with
guns for this year tonight. Complete
attendance of all who have signed up
is desired.
Company A will meet at the Engi-
neering building at 7:15 o'clock and
will march to Ferry field with rifles.
Company B will go directly to Ferry
field and will assemble at 7:30 o'clock.

EXPLAIN ALMI
MVEMORIAL FUND
TO SENIOR CLASS
PLAN APPRIOVED BY PRESIDENTS
OF SENIOR CLASSES AN)
FACULTY
NEED OF FUND IS EVIDENT
Maximum State Appropriations Reach-
ed, While University Continues
to Grow
When the seniors convene at the
"Put Michigan First" mass meeting
tomorrow morning at 11:00 o'clock in
University hall, the tentative plan for
a Michigan Alumni trust fund which
has received the hearty sanction of
senior class presidents, will be ex-
plained. All senior classes meeting
at that hour have been excused to
permit attendance, and caps and gowns
are to be worn on Thursday instead of
Friday.
Not alone are the leaders in the
classes in favor of this movement, but
prominent faculty men have voiced
their approval of this plan to cement
the Michigan alumni together by
means of a financial interest in the
university other than class donations.
President Harry B. Hutchins ex-
pressed himself as favorable to the
general idea outlined in the plan, pro-
vided the seniors approve of it. He
does not, however, wish to use his
official position to influence action on
the part of the students interested. It
is for them to say what, if anything,
should be done, he believes.
Bates Expresses Approval
Dean Henry M. Bates stated: "I
am very much in favor of the general
plan as tentatively outlined, and I
think it is a splendid thing that ii
should have originated with the stu-
dents. Anything I may consistently
do to further it, I will do."
(Continued on Page Two)
Tornado Sweeps
Central States
83 Lives Lost, and Hundreds Injured,
According to Incomplete
Reports
Kansas City, Mo., June 6.-Eighty-
three lives were lost, hundreds of per-
sons were injured, and much property
damage was done throughout large
sections of the states of Arkansas,
Missouri, Illinois, and Mississippi last
night by a tornado, according to in-
complete reports received today. Tabu-
lation shows the following casualties:
Arkansas, 57 dead; Mississippi, 11
dead; Missouri, 14 dead; Illinois, 1
dead. The casualties in Mississippi
were reported from Vicksburg and
Jackson; in Missouri from Dexter and
Stoddard; in Illinois from McClure,
and in Arkansas from nearly a dozen
cities and towns.
SENIOR LITS TO MEET TODAY
Will Elect Alumni Secretary and Trea-
surer and Finish Old Business
The final senior lit class meeting of
the year will be held at 3:00 o'clock
this afternoon in Tappan hall. At
that time election will be held for al-

umni secretary and treasurer, and a
large number of small natters, con-
stituting the unfinished business for
the year, will come up for decision.
The discussion carried over from
last meeting in regard to the allotment
of money for class athletics will be
reopened and brought to a vote. An-
nouncement will be made at this
meeting of the plans evolved for Com-
mencement week.

Senior Women To
Give Annual Pla
Ii P 1resent "61w he " on Tue~sday
F veiilg, ,Ite27, in (Caml-
pus Theater
Following the Senior Promenade on
Tuesday evening, June 27, of Com-
mencement Week, the senior women
will present the annual Senior Girls'
Play in the n'ampus theater on the
green east of Tappan hll. The play
this year is "The Piper," by Josephine
Preston Peabody, and deals with the
story of the Pied Piper of Hamlin
Town, to the tune of whose magic pip-
ings all the children of the village de-
serted their homes and ran away. The
play is to be given complete. Elabor-
ate settings and costumes have been
provided for a cast numbering almost
a hundred women.
The leading roles will be taken by
women who have been prominent in
college dramatics. The part of the
Piper is to be played by Isabelle Ro-
nan, '16, who has had training in
Shakespearean work at the State Nor-
mal school at Ypsilanti and in the ora
tory department here, and who will
appear this week as Maree, in "The
Land of Heart's Desire." Alsa Apfel,
'16, who took a leading part in the
Junior Girls' play of last year, will
play Michael, the lover, and Leila Pike,
who has appeared in Oratorical asso-
ciation plays, will play the lame boy,
Jan.
This is one of the performances giv-
en by the Univc sity women which is
open to the general public, and is al-
ways played before a large audience
of alumnae and students. The com-
mittee in charge consists of Ruth
Brown, '16, Helen Tutill, 16, and l-
len Sargent, '16.
MICHIGAN FACULTY TO
ENTERTAIN MEDICL MEN'
lfenmbers of American :Iedical Assocma-
tion to 1Hol1d1Convention irin 1e-
troit Next Week
Members of the American Medical
association, which will hold its an-
nual convention in Detroit next week,
will be the guests of the faculty of
the Medical school on Friday, June 16.
A reunion of all former students of
the Medical school will be held at the
same time, and quite an extensive pro-
gran has been planned for the day.
The morning will be devoted to
clinics and demonstrations at the Uni-
versity hospital. At 1:00 o'clock a
luncheon will be tendered the visiting
physicians in Barbour gymnasium.
A committee of the wives of the
(Continued ali Page Pigle)
UNION PLANS TO SERVE GUESTS
'o Furnish Meals for Doctors at C om-
ing Medical Conference
With the old Union banquet hall
moved back to the northwest corner
of the lot and the foundation and cel-
lar nearly complete, plans are in or-
der to serve at least 500 guests who
are to attend the medical conference
on the week-end of June 16. The
dining room of the temporary quarters
will occupy the entire cellar, and will
supply ample room for all guests.
The old Pond residence, which has
stood beside the old Union building
for a number of years, will occupy its
place on the south side of the dining

hall as soon as it can be moved to
that place. A board walk will be
built from the temporary quarters to
State street as soon as the main work
on the building has been completed.
Due to a delay in the work of the
Union national campaign committees,
no definite statement of the contribu-
tions can be made at this time. The
total amount of money secured thus
far is estimated at about $753,000.

* *** * * * *
*

SIR tJOHN JELLICOE OFFICIALLY
REPORTS LOSS OF
VESSEL

S 141tSA, .ATTENTiON
Trj311..41sd1y il"tca d of Friday>
this w('ek tu further interest ill
the dPut ichhan First" mass
mecetinig.
(S gned)
JA MES 1. ANGE.-,1 11'16
ii. 11. PIIIJJPS, '16E
I. S. WESTRIOOK;'1OA
1). 6. tl ARf'E, Iol1
I. 1). SCANLAN,'16L
W. 1. MEADE, '161)
R. 1. BROWN.' 'I6l1.

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=x

ON IMPORTANT RUSSIAN V

I#

* *
AgNY TO COMPETE
P'ails< o lii t e<st 54114)fa iinwi -
ST f(E CAOE MRAT IN AGAIN
'ni'ies fe the canoe and swimming
race ' to be h d on the river Saturday
afternoon i connection with the an-t
aual re┬žnt a givn by the University
Boat lub are being received in larget
iximb rs me ordi to announcement
made st day by the committee in
charg. S e i interest is being man-
ifested in the swimming contests, and
it is atieitntcd that the entries in
these events will far outnumber those
of laY ya. As yet the canoe entries
*)5 msoneat 'b ind last year's rec-
ord. i.U Lion i called to the ne-f
(44) nuimvw on Pag Two) 1
WhlAIS GOING ON
- --- .. .t r ..,. . -
Weair for! e st for Ann Arbor andE
vricinity: Rain, with easterly winds in-#
creasing )to a gale.C
1:30 o lock-Junior engineer base-
,1)l practice, South Ferry field.
>:0 o'elock--J-lit baseball practice,
South Ferry field.
7:1,, O'clOCli-{eetlg of the Zoolog-
ical Jo"rn1 club.
7 :i) &eloek--rrof. J. C. Parker
speaks to junior and senior engineers,
room 248, Engineering building.
7 :30 o'cleek-Forestry club meeting,
room 21,. Natural Science building.
8':h1 o'c1k--Oratorical play.
T.0MORROW
7:30 oclock--Meeting of the Pontiac
clubi, Union.
I 1:00 o'clock-Dr. B. C. Hesse lec-
tures on "The Future of the Chemist's
and the Chemical Engineer's Profes-
sion." room 303, Chemistry building.
U-NOTICES
Company A of oficers' drill corps
meets at Engineering building at 7:15
o'clock tonight. Co. B meets at Ferry
field at 7:30 o'clock.
Jiaijuet for Choral Union ushers on
Thursday, June 8, at the Merkle house
on Jefferson avenue at 7:00 o'clock.
All m'_ mb'ers eligible should obtain
tickets of Mr. Holland at the library
eoi'e Thursday noon.
Senior L1t inVitation Committee will
put the remaining 250 engraved an-
noncements on sale today.in U-hall,
I be ween 2:00 and 3:00 o'clock.

OR KITCHENER AND STAFF DROWN
HEN HAMPSHIRE IS BLOWN UP; ALL
BRITIAN IS SHOCKED AT GHEAT LOSS

Believed War Lord Was to Have held
Conference in Regard to a
New Russian Offensive
London, June 6. - "Kitchener is
dead!"
From one end of the British empire
to the other these words were flashed
this afternoon, as rapidly as the radio
and telegraph could transmit them.
They brought to the hearts of the Brit-
ish people the greatest shock, the deep-
est grief that has befallen the United
Kingdom since the outbreak of the
great war.
With his entire staff en route on
an important visit to Russia, Lord
Kitchener, secretary of war, was
drowned on the British cruiser Hamp-
shire to the west of the Orkney Islands
about 8:00 o'clock last night, " by
mine or torpedo" as Sir John Jellicoe,
commander of Britain fleet, officially
reported this afternoon.
Entire Crew Lost
Every officer and man on the Hamp-
shire was lost. Accompanying Lord
Kitchener there were, besides the
members of his staff, a number of
British army officers. The normal
complement of the Hampshire was 655
officers and men. She was 450 feet
long and displaced 11,000 tons. Her
armament was four 7.5 inch guns, six
6-inch guns and two torpedo tubes.
A capsized boat and a few as yet
unidentified bodies were washed
ashore late this afternoon. Otherwise
there is no trace of the lost cruiser
and her precious human cargo. Peo-
ple on the shore of the Orkneys who
witnessed the Hampshire sinking saw
four boats being lowered immediately
after the explosion, but saw nothing
later. The warship saik within a few
minutes.
Little Hope for Any Survivors
The wind was north-northwest, the
observers said,and heavy seas were
running. Patrol vessels and destroy-
ers at once proceeded to the scene of
the disaster and a party was sent
along the coast to search, but only
some few bodies were found. Accord-
(Continued on Page Eight)
JUNE INLANDER OUT THURSDAY
Appears Tomorrow Instead of Friday;
Delay Avoided
Announcement has been made by the
editorial staff of the Inlander that the
June number of the literary magazine
will make its appearance upon the
campus at noon tomorrow instead of
Friday.
The earlier date is due to the fact
that an anticipated'delay in the pub-
lishing has been obviated.
3IICHIGANENSIAN SALE CLOSES
WITH ONLY FEW COPIES LEFT
The sale of the Michiganensian at
the stand in University hall closed
last night, with a f&w copies remain-
ing on hand. More extra copies were
sold at the general sale than came
with the shipment of books, but there
are a few regular subscriptions which
have not been redeemed. Persons
holding subscriptions may still redeem
them at the office in the Press building
by paying the $2.00 balance. No pref-
erence will be shown these sub-
scribers.
Anyone who wishes to buy a book
on general sale may do so at the Press
building.

I U

TONIGHT
8 o'clock
University
Hall

Humor

- Fun - Pathos

Tragedy

IN THE

TONIGHT
8 o'clock
University
Hall

THREE MODERN IRISH PLAYS

Presented Tonight by the

BeaiutifuulCmmne linna Rnd framatioca1v Poweul

I

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