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June 03, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.~

t

tour Ease of Mind
Self-possession and personal" effici-
icy depends largely upon the clothes you wear.
we are your tailors you Will always have that
,eling that comes with
Clothes of Character
G. H. WILD COMPANY

LEADING MERCHANT TAILORS

STATE ST.

1,

mom

S ECI' ,AL
For this Week only all Grawiord McGrogor
SGOLF CLUBS

IICH6XDAL
Official newvsp)aer- at the Univervity of
Michigan. 1 Iblished leve:ry morning except
Monday d oriw.g 1'e univ ersity year.
j Enrtered at the post-ofliice at Ann Arbor as
second-class 'oat ter.
Francis F. McKinney..,Managing Editor
Jchn S. L eonard.......... business Manager
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub- d~ltt o.;-Curys ~uc soSpl
Store, The 1)el ' , cor Packard' and State.1
P'honies: i;.,,ness, 960o; Editorial, 2414.
('uniutctio~snot to e.xceed 30o words it
length, or of e. 1 vents will be published
in T he Daily i f lft at the office in the Ann
Arbor P'ress BhtJg., or in the notice box in the
west corridor of the general library, where
th de notices are lletetd at 7:00 o'clock each
E, Rodgers Sylvester News Editor
T011 C. Reid.............'Telegraph Editor
Verne lwtnet.............'legraph Editor '
f . f'. W'righ.................Sports Editor
J.- C. B. !'a:rker.......... Assignment Editor
Cnad N. C urci)...............City fEditor
Edwin A. Htyman....... ........City Editor
Lee Jo~lvn............... ..City Editor
Gordon I). Cooke........... tnl itical E.itor
Golda Ginsburg .............. Womren's Editor
Edward E. Mack ........ Adverising lanager
RI. Kirk White.......... Publication Manager
Y. R. Althseler....... Circulation 'Manager
C. V. Sellers........... .Accountant
C. 'T Fishleigh . .Assistant Business Mianager

$2175 Drivers, now
2.5Brassies, now
2.25 Irons, Popular Model

.. $2.25
- 2.2'5
1.75

GOLF BAGS at REDUCED PRICES
SEE 'SW
STUDENTS BOOKSTORE

Nly ,I:t Editors

'.

I

Leonard W, Nieter
L, . S.Tlhoinpson
Ilenley hill

Earl Pardee
J. L. Stadeker
II. C. L. Jacksonl

DETROIT UNITED LINES I
Between D-troit, Ann Arbor and Jack son.
Cars run on Eastern tinge, one hour faster.
than local time.
Detroit Limited and -Express Cars-S:io a.I
mn. alld hourly to 7:1u p. 51n., 9:1o P- In.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars -8:48 a. mn. and
every tNo hours to 6:48 P. in.; to L~ansing,
9:,j8 p. Il.
Local Cars, Eastbound-5 :35 a. mn., 6:40 a, m,
7:05 a. mn., and every two hours to ' :05 p. n.,
8:o5 p., Im., 9:05 p. i., 10:50 11.nm. To Ypsi.
.anti 11onl, 8:48 a. Inl. (daily except Sunday),
9:20 a. tm., 12:0; 1p. n., 6:o5 1p. n., 11:45 P.
Ell., I:10 a. inl., 1:20 a. 11.
Local Care, Westbound---6 :os a,.in., 7:50 a.
11:1, and every; tw'o hours to 7:50 p. n5., 10:20
p, nm., 12 :s a. in.
The Ann Arbor Sayings Bank
Organized 1869
Capital ...........$' 300,400.00
Surplus.... ..$150,000.00
Resources over .... $3,000,000.00)
Blanking in all branches
1111n. office, N. IV. Corner M~ain
and Huron Sts.
Braneb Office, 707 North, Univ-
ersity Aye tue.
STATE AND GERMAN AMERICAN
SAVINGS BANK
Main $ Washington Sts.
Rle,~V~ $295:0090OO1OO
FRA'TERNITIES
Let mie figure with you on your next
year's supply of coal. N*%ow is the
time to loots after next year's coal
supply.
Juo. J. SAUTER
Phone 2484 '310 W - Liberty

most tolerable kind of warfare ac- "
cording to the feelings of our
{ld-y * * Present day warfare has
al '-bso;lutely nothing in common
wvithl knightly warfare. To burn
out the enemy's eyes or lungs, to 1
bombard unfortified towns and
villages from the air, from the
depths of the wart's to rip the
bellies of defenseless ships car-
rying men or goods, to kill or
maim women or children, old men
and sick people with air bombs!
'or torpedoes, is this more chival-
rous than our attempt to cut off
from the enemy the opportunity
of buying and selling, and so com-
pel him to cease his shell fire?'"
We might have avenged the wrongs
of our trade long ago
"if Germany had not been doing
us a wrong that affects us far
more deeply, for almost a year,
by the murder of American citi-
zens. The sorrow of the widowed,
of the orphaned, of mourning par-
ents, cries more loudly to heavena
than the loss of merchantmen.",
"The submarine war does not
v Iolaite any of the soveoreign rights
01, men andl nations. It can not.
but violate them if' it is not con-
fined to warships."
Our feeling toward Germany was
embittered by the plots of her na-
turalized partisans here:
"~From their error arose the
second element of poison. To pick
and choose all the tasty morsels
from our country (the United
States) and at the first storm to
behave as a raging German or
frious Irishman---that would be
an intolerable. piece of presump-
tion."
Hie then reviews at some length the
conditions and incidents which led to
the diplomatic isolation of tche Cen-
tral Powers and the cementing of the
])resent Entente Powers, next launch-
ing into a bitter attack on the "nili-
tarism" of his nation.
"That militarism alone can
guarantee constant readiness of
every limb of the body politic for
the rapid transition to war is
Iroved by Germany's achievement,
which is unequaled in the history
of the world.. That is, in the ma-
terial sphere; as a spiritual
achievement many will p)lace high-
er the voluntary enlistment of
three million island and colonial
1 ng"lishmen, the heroic endurance
and self-sacrifice of the Serbians
and the French, fighting in the
very face of the enemy. T~wenty
million heroes area fighting be-
tween Antwerp and Trebizond,
and the majority grew, up in tin-
military countries."
Harden demands "no armed t
but a firm peace" and prodicel
downfall of the military or-de(- -1
1 ariiing that "the days of comptI
armaments are deyad," and that K'
a rms are ma~de be taken outofW
reach of private buisiness, and be V
wholly a goveornment industry. j
looks forward to a pooling of >
even large ones aftel, the wa ,
makes some attempt to soWN
qIuestion of the huge war deficit:.
which he says it will take 60 i .
to recover, unless these can be i4~
talined by some credit arrang .
. ' re sult will be "what has
happ31e'1edt befoi e anydAthere on P
( 't" 'tiuiiitlcd on Page @' it ' ;,. ...

Seniors! Time's Flying
Order Them Now
CallingCad
Price $1.50 to $3.50
per hundred with plate
Aw1 R'&
W ~m KfVNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES

Hot Water
usually stops when the furnace
goes out.
Hot Water 'all summer with a
Gas-Fired Heater.
Wash tenaw Gas Co.

rimma"Mmm

We Have a
FULL LINE OF
Cut Flowers and Plants
For All Occasions
CUS IN"S & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Phone t115

1I

'Reporters
IT. .\. 'Vitzgerald Cecil Andrews
Tintotn 13. Dinotd .,". A. Baumgarth
Blruce Swalney 'E L. Ziegler
W. 12. Atlas F+ rank 'Taber
Nat ,' lhoms,,t)1IHolland Thompson
Phil P'ack 11. C. Garrison
Allen Shoenfield D. S. Rood
C. WV. Neumann Jas. Schermerhorn, Jr.
Business Staff
Albert E. Borne Roscoe Ran
E. C. Musgrave F. .M. Sutter
K. S. MfcColl L. W. Kennedy
C. P'. Emery Bernard Wohl
J. E. Campbell

1, t I I , W., 'I mmmi

. 2 -1

SATUJRDAY, JUTNE 3, 1916.

IHAVE IT!
Wea~xbetter tihan
Leather
VA N'1S QUALITY
SHOE SHO
The Nlew Shop, 1114 S. Univer-Sily
ASK FOR and GET
THE ORIGINAL
+c d_> substitutes cost YOU same price.

I-

TYPEWRITIG
MIMIEOGRAPU"ING I
MULTIGRIAPRINGI
Hamilton Business College
State and sW ilan'sI

.

II

You know there's a difference in

clothes; it's in the genuine

and lasting distinction of appearance- due to reel knowledge
of fashion and design with real care for the nit'eties of dress.

I , Mmks

Capper & Capper
Furnishings

D. B.GRENNAN
REAL CUSTOM TAILOR
606 E. LIBERTY STREET

Nigh:. Editor.....,,.Leonard W. Nieter~
OF THE kIGHTEENTH INTPR-
' .SCI iOLASTIC
M\ichi gan holds this week-end her
eighteenth Interscholastic track meet.
Hiigh school athletes have gathered in
Ann Arbor from all parts of the tmid-
dle west to compete for athletic hn-
orns on Ferry field. These athletes of
the secondary schools represent the
best in their institutions. They are
the college men of tomorrow.
Michigan undegraduates are hosts
for it(day. It l5 out' (uty anld i--
Iege to entertain these boys, and nt
')nly to make dhini eel at home, but
foeil that Ann Arbor is the place for
them to come to college. Tell them
whly you curve to Michigan. Tell them
why you have enjoyed your years it
Ann Arbor, and whry you are ,glad you
did not go elsewhere. Point ot the
opportunities for work alichign
and some of the opportunities for
pleasurc', and don't forget to go to
the mass-mneeting tonight in Uill au-
ditorium. Be good hosts!
Wlll+,4ILL 1,PEACE COME?
Everyday finds discuson of peace in
the press of our country, the forum oif
the world. Pr'eident Nilson, by his
spe citbes, makwi it } nown h) desires"
to act as mediator whien the proper
time appears to be at hand. The
strongest appeals conecrot from the
Allies, but front Germany, whose
chancellor, despite bitter words of
caution from public mnen of his state,
talks in conciliatory words.
The following points of view may
be taken as representative H-err von
Grafe recently said in the Reichstag:l
"Give the German people their
right (to conduct unrestrained
warfare at sea) before It Is too
late, before the pen and ink have
sp oiled and lost all that our
bloody sword has won"
Answering; this demand, a sociali:Nt
speaker, de fending the government
position said:
"Under no circumstances the
socialists in favor of the continut-
aition of the war for the sake of
nitre or less insane objects of
con qutet. Annexation of terri-
tory is in no 'ray consisten with
the true interests of the people."
W'e may assume that the most dis-
tingulmahed of German publicists, Maxi-
nmiflian Hiat-den, represents pretty well
tnle most enlightened opinion of his
coint'yrne. On. April 22 in his news-
paper, "Di1e Zkunft," Tie *u~lisied a
most remarkat1lo article called "If I
Were Wilson," an Imagined address
by our president, urging th; belliger-
enrt nations to peace. The artile is
striking because its sentiments are
very sang, very much like America's,
aird indicate h0: profound desire for
peace, beside suggesting the funda-
mental conditions of settlement.
lie accept, President N+, jsn as
mediator with this comment
"Attempts are made to lower in
public opinion the president of
the United States as a tuilon'os
ani contemptible fool. Muchet
greater men have borne In silence
Isimilar insults for decad&."
JEvery warring warring natiorn as-
sails 'us (the United States) w^ith its
arg~umntls and justifications:
"Great Britain is carrying on
an Industrial war against Gem-
many, prevents- the importation
of provisions, and ays: This
form or warfare is not only per-
mitted and has been customary
from olden times uip to the pres-
ent against beleaguered towns
and counries, but it is also the

re e denor
goldndecor din' to
what-youApui n 'em. A little
V LXI'Twifpt a lot o'
a y' ourS
N ->,"A- A~et-. 13

i

0

SAM-I BURCHELELD

&CO*

Fine Tailoring

LOOK INI'O THIS ". IM'ay Fcstiva l artists make
The policy taken out in ~the Provi- l lRecords. chache crle & Son.
denTf' ~t ( ife Ind Trust Co. at an early ......-...._m__- -...._._

Victor
t ufl
a J1

! into b- t k.nhe-t '

'Four
w ' ' sity

~;tAW1i itseli ~ lii('h v. 'i';i{l 1cC~a :. a- , -
.t(('eptant e a~ a m-igk tai'o . 1~ -
HauLer, Distm-~ Ag-- at - ~1e 1 'i w
halO ~utt1 Trast to. - U. - ;- -An;

tf
1:1

g W" .!. :"Y l. o F; i. . a , lh' t Sc'A ''-" _,a

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