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June 02, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-06-02

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TH lE DAILY
JNEWIS 01 1FrUWORLD ANI
'THE CAMPUS

op.
,yam
At 3
1%"JAN

Ploles :---torial 2414
&islness 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 173.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 1916.

PRICE FIVE

FRESHMEN THROW
GAPS INTO HUGE
BO'NFIRE TONIGHT'
HUGE 1,31"1'WILL BE FORIE) BY
MOV1INt PROCESSION
OF STUDENTS
ALL STUDENTS MEET AT 1:30
Sophomor Torch Line Will Replacel
Former Custoug of .Paddling
Freshmen i

x:
a=
It
*

CAP NIGHT PROGRAM
Time---:00 o'clock
Place--bservatory Hollow.
All studenis meet by classes
on vCamtUIIs at 7:30 o'clock.
Processiout staris at 7 :45
o'c iock
Seniors meet at engineering
arch, jinmniors between economics
buildnig and library, sopho-
mI'ores nt flagjole, and freshmen
in auditorium of natural sci-
enIee biildig at 7:15 o'clock.
Seniors wear caps and gowns.
Freshmen idear tennis slhoes.
Officials iimeet ii north wing
of U'-hall at 6:44 o'clock.
LINE OF IfARCH-North on
State street to Ann, then east
on Ann to Observatory, south on
Observatory and along boule-
vard to Observatory Hollow.
licep off the lawns.
* * *s *' * * * * * * *

With exultant yells and fantastic
stops over one thousand fresneienf
will consign their little gray caps into
the flames of a huge bonfire at Ob-
servdtory Hollow tonight, thereby
marking their transition into the priv-
ileged ranks of sophomoredoni.
Accompanied by all the othert
classes they will march to the natural
amphitheater and in the presence of<
alumni, the Interscholastic men, and
(Continved on Page Four)
BARRI TERS TAKE IN 10 MENI
$enior Law Honorary Society Holds
llanquet After Initiatio4i
Once more the traditional pillory of#
the Barristers, senior law honoraryt
society, appeared upon the campus for
a short time yesterday afternoon, and
at that time it held 10 junipr laws.
The men who were initiated yester-
day are: L. L, #Alexander, Kenneth
Barnard, J. L. Beers, G. C, Caron, L.
F. Dahling, H. G. Gault, R. A. Mc-#
Ginnis, L. S. Moll, J. E. Sanders and
W. H. Sandford,
J. F. Scott, '16L, was the toastmas-
ter at the banquet held at Mack's
Tea Room after the initiation. Thet
speakers were: Dean Henry M. Bates,
R. A. McGinnis, '17L, M. E. Pitkin,{
'16L, and Renville Wheat, '1QL. I4. J.t
$carnlan, '16L, and B. H. Stevens,' 16L,
appeared in several musical numbers.t
't'URKIS111 TUOOPS IN ('AU(1ASIJS
PEPOIITE D AS ON OFFENSIVE1
Constantinople, June 1.-Turkish
troops in the Caucasus took the offen-
sive against the Russians over a front
of 20 miles on Tuesday. The Turiv
announce the capture by Turkish
troops of Namaksartum.
Report Italian Evacuation of To 1n
London, June 1.--Italian troops have+
evacuated the fortified town of Asiago
before the Austrian advance, accord-'
ing to the Rome correspondent of the+
Times.

TripConcert 'A
Howling Success '
Rag Pickers' S xtet and "B111" Wil-
lianis Please A pprecialive
Atieence
"A howling success" are the words
to characterize the Trip Concert held
before a crowdof 3,000 people in Hill
auditorium last night. The well-bal-
anced and Olever program was full of
life and "ginger" from first to last,
and every number was encored by the
audience, which gave the men an even
better reception than they receivedl
on their western trip.
By far the most popular number on
the. program was "Syncopations," by
the Rag Pickers' Sextet. The sextet
renrdered a medley of popular and
humorous airs in true ragtime style,
(Continued on Page Six)
WILON REUS
DEMNS -OFNOTE
Disatching of Two Millio Rations'
Puts Dangerous Light on
Mexican Situation
iiAP NOT EXPECTI'E) T 1 :SU'iN
Washington, June l.-President
Wilson will not comply with the de
mand of General Carranza for the
withdrawal of American troops from
Mexico until satisfied that the de facto
government is preparo to establish
and effectively maintain peace and
order. This flat statement of the ad-
ministration's policy will not, it is
believed, lead to war. The United
States does not want an armed con-
flict, it was said by the authorities in
Washington.
provide Provision for 'Troops
El Paso, June 1.--Two million ra-
tions have been sent to Columbus, New
Mexico, for the American army of oc-
cupation in Mexico. The dispatching
of such a large number of rations is
said to have been done so that un-
der trouble with the Carranzistas, in
which the American lines of communi-
cation might le cut, the American
command would not suffer for lack
of provisions.
Two million rations would last
13,000 men, which is about the number
now in Mexico with General Pershing,
for 154 days. Announcement of the
sending of this large supply of food
to the American army coming as it
does at a time when General Persh-
ing is meeting with General Gaviera,
the Mexican commander of the north,
is taken as an indication that the con-
ference has nothing to do with the
withdrawal of the American forces
from Mexico.
Discuss 'Plaing of -rores
Two meetings between the American
and the Mexican commander were
held today, and both generals stated
that they were merely discussing the
distribution of their forces to avoid
friction. It was said the latest Car-
ranza note to the United States re-
ceived not even an allusion during
the meeting of the two generals.
American forces continue to retire
northwards, according to the best in-
formation obtainable. Details of the
abandonment of the American camp

at San Antonio were received today
when a number of American soldiers
reached here from Namiquipa. They
said the withdrawl was made so hur-
riedly that all the supplies that could
not be taken were piled in the center
of the camp, saturated with gasoline.
set on fire and destroyed. The or-
ders for the withdrawal, the men said.,
came from Washington direct and
without any recommendation of Gen-
eral Pershing. and without even con-
sulting him.

U $'l'E GET TIKETS EN'IRfRESINIC'T C lARGE ME'

Promptly at 7:15 o'clock Saturday
evening, the strains of Michigan's
Varsity band will welcome hundreds
of Intrscholastic visitors to the first
"Farewell" mass meeting in the his-
tory of the university.
"Bob" Bennett, as cheer lader, will
introduce to the youthful athletes the
famous Wolverine battle-cries, the
"locomotive" and the U. of M. yell,
while George Burke and "Wap" John
in their talks will recall the memor-
ies of spirited yell-fests held during
football seasons of the past. Varsity
baseball, track and tennis men will
receive their "M's" at the first public
presentation of these letters, from the
hands of Prof. t. W. Aigler, chairman
of the board in control of athletics.
The same plan of ticket distribution
as employed for fall mass meetings
((ontinued on Page Four)
MICH IGANNSIAN Will
CO ON SALE1 TOMORROW
Wear Books to Be Placed in Corridor
ofU -hall; Sale ('ontinues
Until Monday.
Word was received today that the
entire edition of the Michiganensian
would arrive in Ann Arbor so that
it would be possible to place the book
on sale Saturday morning.
Copies 'f the book were received
last week and in the opinion of those
who have seen them the year book
promises this year to be the best an-
nual ever turned out at the University.
Not the least interesting thing about
the book is the fact that a steel en-
graving of one of the most popular
deans on the campus has been made
for the dedication page. The color work
of the book is uniform, following a
leafy design, and is made on five-color
process plates.
The books will be placed on sale
in the corridor in University hall Sat-
urday morning. At this place all of
the subscriptions will be. redeemed.
The sale will continue until Monday
night. Subscriptions which are not
redeemed by this time will be cancell-
ed and the books not taken will be
placed on sale. There are less than
50 books out of the entire edition or-
dered which are not subscribed. for,
and these may he' had at the stand
by those who did not subscribe in the
winter.
SOPHS TO ELECT COUNCILMAN
Voting of '18 Eingiieer Representative
l'ostponed from Wednesday
The election of the sophomore en-
gineer student councilman, which was
postponed from last Wednesday, will
be held from 9:00 o'clock to 12:00
o'clock today at the head of the main
stairs in the Engineering building,
near the Technic office, All soph en-
gineers should vote. S. S. Atwood, E'
G. Dudley and Waldo Wt. McKee are
the nominees.
LIA)Y)-(xEO}IGE NOT RE4i )Y
Tl) REPORT .11W11 STATi'S
London, June 1.-Officials of the
British government characterize as
premature statements that have ap-
peared in the press that David Lloyd-
George was about to make an an-
nouncement of the result of his con-
Iferences with the Irish leaders.

Representatives of 50 high and prep
schools are arriving in Ann Arbor this
morning to compete in Michigan's
eighteenth annual Intercholastic. En-
tries received by the management in-
dicate this year's classic will be the
largest meet ever conducted by the
university, and the reputations of in-
dividual entrants give promise of fast
performances on the cinder track as
well as some record breaking marks
in the field events.
The contestants wilL report to Inter-
scholastic Manager Ray Mills in the
athletic offices in the Press building
between 8:00 and 11:00 o'clock, after
which inspection of university build-
ings and automobile rides will occupy
their time until noon. The fraterni-
ties and house clubs which are shar-
ing the entertainment of the visitors
(Continued on Page Five)
MILLER PITCHES FIRST
NOTRE DAME CONTEST
Newell MAay Replace Harrington at
First Base; Game Beghis
at 4:0 o'lock
"ShortyY Miller will oppose Notre
Dame in the first of the two-game se-
ries which is scheduled for Ferry
field this afternoon and tomorrow
morning. The game today will begin
at 4:05 o'clock.
Coach Lundgren stated last night
that Newell might replace Harrington
at first base, since Tom is not in the
best shape. If this alteration is made,'
Thomas will follow Walterhouse in
the batting order, with "Morry" Dunne
going up to seventh position.
The lineup will be: Reem. lf; Nie-
mann, rf; Labadie. cf; Brandell, ss;
Walterhouse, 2b; Harrington, lb;
Thomas, 3b; Dunne, c; Miller, p.
REJECTS POLAND RELIEF PLAN
Germany W ill Not Accept Counter Pro-
posals Made by the Enemy
Berlin, May 30, via London, June 1.
-Germany will not accept Great Bri-
tain's counter proposals for the relief
of Poland. The British proposals were
found to be inacceptable to Germany
largely on account of the fact that this
country is unable to give the guaran-
tee demanded by Great Britain for the
simultaneous feeding of Serbia, Mon-
tenegro, and the section of Poland oc-
cupied by Austria as a condition for
permitting food for Poland to pass
the British blockade.-
Germany is willing to use best ef-
forts to have the system of rationing
introduced there, but those countries
are outside her sphere of control and
it would be necessary to obtain the
sanction of the Austrian and Bulgar-
ian authorities.
REPORT ITALIAN KING RETIING
B EFORE A USTRIAN OFFENSVE
Berlin, by wireless, June 1.-It is
reported, although not confirmed, that
King Victor Emmanuel and his special
staff have departed secretly from the
Italian general headquarters at Nagine
on account of the Austrian offensive,
and retired to Venice.
An air raid on Bari on the Italian-
Adriatic coast, during wieh various
government establishments were suc-
cessfully bombarded, is reported by the
Austro-Hungarian admiralty.

TO GIVE OUT "M'S"
A T MASS MEETING
Varsity Baseball, Track and Tennis
lMen to R*eeil c
Letters

INTERSCHOLASTIC
MEN HOLD TRILgS
Contestants to Report at Athletic
Office in Press Building
This Norning

Choose To for COULTER ELECTE
Gargoyle StaffUNO PRSD
Also Select Frank F. Nesbit, '17, Man.
aging Editor of the
SInlander .F R O I S Y

Three appointments to the staffs of
the Gargoyle and Inlander, for the
year 1916-1917, were made by the
Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions at a meeting held yesterday.
Ralph E. Folz, '17, was selected to
act as managing editor of the Gar-
goyle, and H. Kirk White, '17, was
chosen business manager of the same
publication. Folz has been a member
of the Gargoyle staff for the past two
years, while White has been connect-
ed with the business staff of the Daily
for three years.
Frank F. Nesbit, '17; was appointed
(Continued on Page.;Six),
Teutons Penetrate French Trenches,
but Lose Ground at Dead
Man's Hill
TrRIF .C FIGH'TING CONTINUES
Paris, June 1.-After several des-
perate assaults, German troops suc-
ceeded in penetrating French trenches
between Forts Douaumont and Vaux,
the official night report admits.
The Germans were, nowever, com-
pletely repulsed in an attack delivered
at 8:00 o'clock last night on the French
position at Dead Man's Hill. A violent
bombardment continued in this region
throughout the night.
French Gain Foothold
Berlin, via London, June 1.-In an
attack on German positions southeast
of Dead Man's Hill on the Verdun
front, the French obtained a foothold
in the German first line trenches over
"an extent of 400 meters, the war of-
fice admits today.
The French made repeated assaults
on the German lines, but all other than
that at the point mentioned were
beaten -off with extremely heavy
losses.
Bulgars Report Anglo-French Advance
Berlin, June 1.-A general move-
ment of Anglo-French troops at Salon-
iki toward the Macedonian border,
which has been in progress for some
time, is reported in an official state-
ment from the Bulgarion army head-
quarters under date of May 24. The
report also tells of the driving back of
a French reconnoitering party near
the frontier lines.

"'Mii wwii i ..,inMwum~:_":
MANAGERSHIPS GO TO HOWLAND
CHENOT, SANDERS. AND
SMITH
INCREASED INTEREST SHOW
Much Larger Number of Votes Cast
for All Officers Than
Last Year
Michigan's second annual all-cam-
pus election came to a close lastnight
with a much larger number of votes
cast for all officers than in the pre-
ceding year. The ballot for Union
president, in which four candidates
were running, was particularly close,
Glenn M. Coulter, '16-'18L, winning b'
a majority of six, in contrast to last
year's majority of 105.- Other results
also exhibited keen competition. The
final results of all elections follow:
Athletic Association Officers
Baseball manager: Glenn A. How-
land, '17L; majority, 119. Assistant
baseball managers: Can H. Adam,
'18;S. G. Pratt, '18E; H. M. Stephen,
'18E; P. M. Ireland, '18; majorities,
56, 34, 11, 11, respectively.
Intercollege manager: J. E. Chenot,
'16-'19L; majority, 85. Assistant in-'
tercollege managers: Carl Neumann,
'18; H. T. Porter, '18E; Stratton Shar-
tel, '18; Arthur Heuer, '18; majorities,
265, 196, 181, 81, respectively.
Track manager: J. E. Sanders, '17L;
majority, 330. Assistant track mana-
gers: F. J. Thieme, '18E; E. G. Dud-
ley, '18E; H. S. Bohling, '18; J. M.
Taylor, '18; majorities, 170, 122, $7,
82, respectively.
Interscholastic manager: Gordon
Smith, '17E; Atmajority, 16.' Assistant
interscholastic managers: C. W. Fisch-
er, '18; R. M. Langley, '18E; D. C.
Davidson, '18; E. C. Schacht, '18E; ma-
jorities, 154, 141, 56, 41. respectively.
Michigan Union Officers
President: Glenn M. Coulter, '16-
'18L; majority, 6. Recording secre-
tary: Lee E. Joslyn, '17; majority, 114.
Vice-president for Law school: Ken-
neth Barnard, '17L; majority, 14. Vice-
president for literary college: A. S.
Hart, '17; majority, 18. Vice-president
for engineering college: R. W. Collins,
'17E; majority, 10. Vice-president for
Medical school: George McClure,
'17M; majority, 10. Vice-president for
combined colleges: E. W. Crysler,
'17P; majority, 3. Faculty members
Board of Directors: Dean H. M. Bates,
Dr. Reuben Petersen, Prof. Wm. A.
Frayer (only three condidates).
Student Councilmen
M. L. Dunne, '17L; Harold O'Brien,
'17; H. Kirk White, '17; majorities,
311, 156, 40, respectively.
Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications
Harry Gault, '17L; Tom C. Reid,
'17; Don Smith, '17E; majorities, 292,
111, 29, respectively.
Women's Judiciary Council Repre-
sentatives
Senior representative, Anita Kelley.
Junior representative, Valora Quinlan.
Sophomore representative, Margaret
Hurst.
MR. AND MRS. W. F. MARSTELLER
CHAPERON UNIVERSITY DANCE
The last University dance of the
year will be held at Packard academy
on Saturday evening. Tickets will
be on sale today from 11:00 to 12:00
o'clock and from 2:00 to 3:00 o'clock
in the main corridor of University
hall. The remainder of the tickets
will be sold on Saturday from 11:00
to 12:00 o'clock. There will be no

Union dance this week. The chaperons
are Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Marsteller.

Ir

I

WHAT'S GOING ONI

t

f-

TODAY
1:30 o'clock-Preliminaries in Inter-
scholastic, Ferry field.
3:00 o'clock - Women's field day,
women's athletic field.
3130 o'clock--Senior lit baseball
practice, Ferry field.
4:05 o'clock--Notre Dame vs. Michi-
gan, baseball game, Ferry field.
Cap Night.

y

TO3YORROW
9:30 o'clock A. X1.-Notre Dame vs.
Michigan baseball game, Ferry field.
2:0{) o'clock-Finals in Interscho-
lastic, Ferry field.
8:30 o'clock-Masonic party, Mason-
ic temple.
9:00 o'clock - University dance,
Packard academy.
U-NOTICES
All men selling Trip Concert tick-
ets report between 1:00 and 3:00
o'clock, in room 160, New Science
building.
All band men report in blue uniform
at 7:00 o'clock tonight, in U-hall.

I W.. ,

Interscholastic

Today

Trials in Track and Field Events
FERRY FIELD, 1:30 P. M.
Admission Including Base Ball Came, 50c

BASEBALL'
Notre Dame vs.
FERRY FIELD, 4:0
Ad mQ~lefl - - -nn

TODAY II

Michigan
5 P.M.

m.-

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