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June 01, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE :DAILY1
500C
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

or.
1P'

Phones :- 1toial 2414
Ihislness 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUZY

0

VOL. XXVI. No. 172.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THRIJSDAY, JUNE 1, 1916.

PRICE FIVE

BIG FIRE TO MARK
PASSING OF RHOSH
Space is;.,redt for Prep Athletes at
Fesici iies of Cap
Night
PACE EAN HATES ON PROGRAMI
One of the Biggest Cap Night blazes
since the institution of the tradition
at Michigan will belch forth in Ob-
servatory hollow tomorrow night, ac-
cording to the student council com-
mittee, who have secured the largest
amount of combustibles and boxes
that have ever been available.
The last sneaier for the occasion
was secured last night when Dean
Henry M. Bates, of the Law school,
consented to represent the faculty.
Pree shows 'for the freshmen Eave
been granted by the management of
the Orpheum and Arcade theaters.
The yearlings will not be admitted to
the Orpheum, however, until the end
,of the first show.
Space at the ceremonials has been
reserved for the several hundred prep
and high school athletes here for the
Interscholastic.
A mass meeting to instruct. the
freshmen regarding the ceremonies
will be held in the auditorium of the
natural science building at 7:00 o'clock
tomorrow night. The various classes
will gather on the campus at 7:30
"ueJock for the march to the hollow.
The ,eniors will meet at the engineer-
ing arc:, juniors between the econom-
ies building and the library, sopho-
mores at the flag pole and freshmen
behind the law bujlding.
The seniors will wear their caps and
gowns and the freshmen tennis shoes.
The committee of sophomores to
collect boxes will meet at the Union
at 4:30 o'clock today.
SPEAERS ECURE OR
FIALMASS MEETING

EVERYTHING HRDYFORI
BIG CONCERT TONIgT
Musical Stans Haive 61many Nv m
For This Enter ainwi bys
Muia Clubs

EXPECST BIG VOTE IN
ALL-CAMPUS ELECTION
'; )+ah# to s ie O'1v jed from
9 :15 &( lock Until 1:15
A big rote in today's All-Canipus
E.;'tion was forecasted yesterday by

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* * * 1: * * * 4,

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EVE RYBOD)Y (,,AN VOT1E !
Every student in the uiirr.
sity is expected to vote at the
different organization elections
to be held today in the corridor
of University hall from 9:4 to
4:15 o'clock.
All men and women students
cain vote, including freshmen.
*~ * * * * * * * * * *

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GERMANS GAINING
IN VERU-N REGION

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*k

"We're going to give the best
cert ever heard in Ann Arbor,"

}}I11
cm-1.

Crown Prince in Series of Attacks
Drives Back Frenel West
of Meuse
ASQUITH DENIES PEACE PLANS

a

a prominent member of the combined jh ,l; Ltudent Council committee in
musical clubs last night. 1 acon- a;eg of the voting.
tinued: Last year more than 800 persons
"Every one of the fellows is kved uoed, which was the largest number
to the highest notch for tonight's mu- ing at a similar election in the his-
sic fest. Sikes, Scanlan, Wilson, Hi- lory of the university, and it is be-
ett, Hartesveldt, Kerr, Wheeler and UIeved that the success of last year,
the numerous others who graduate ( c ombined wi.h the unusual interest in
this year, are determined to make this ithe elections this year, will result in
last appearance surpass all others in Ir even larger vote.
every respect. The Midnight Sans have The election booths will be opened
a collection of new tricks. The Varsity , t 9:45 o'clock and will close at 4:15
Quartet is in excellent condition. The o'clock. The tables of the different
Rag Pickers' Sextet, who have been so organizatiois participating in the elec-
well received in the past, have a num- Lion will be marked and will be in
ber of new hits which they will place charge of the men from the different
on exhibition tonight." crganizations,
({; sln tied on Pag .e h40 )(f'ontp tilt n age F ire)

"BILL" WILLIAMS, '14E
Who appears on Trip Concert progra
tonight
Food Shortage In
Germany Serious
Conditions Are Becoming Worse Daily;
Women and Children Wait
for Supplies
London, May 31.-A careful inves-
tigation of the actual food situation in
Germany reveals the fact that condi-
tions are becoming worse daily. Offi-
cials are no longer able to conceal the

k4/ 1144 Va4444 V 14. 1114 1. 44,6:q., ... iv kj

:vatets zncec i/xa A.t&Fu VAIVI

i

CAMPUS ELECTION DAY
DATE: THURSDAY, JUNE 1
T'IME: 9:45 A. . TO 4:15 i. M'
PLACE CORRIDOR OF U-HA I 2l
NOMINEES

alar:ming state of affairs. The food
uation is actually threatening to
come the most important factor

sit-
be-
of

Burke to
'I'l,Ik

for8!4 etrts; Mc'elalion
to Vpsiod

Complete announcement of the
spe 1;ers for Saturday night's "Fare-
well" n ss meeting has just been
made by the fcommittee in charge of
the get-together, and "pep" in no un-
certain quantity is bound to be un-
loosed by the men selected t.o do the
taiking.
George TBurke, city attorney and for-
mer county prosecutor, will represent
the alumni. Burke is possessed of elo-
quence which probably is not surpas-
sed by any resident within the pre-
cincts of Ann Arbor.
W. A. P. John, '16, managing editor
of the Gargoyle, will speak for the
student body. John was one of the
speakers at a football mass meeting
last fall when the audience broke
loose in unrestrainable enthusiasm.
George McMahon, '16, will preside
over the meeting, and will express the
university's welcome to the hundreds
of visiting high school athletes.
Prof. R. W. Aigler, chairman of the
board in control of athletics, will pre-
sent the "M's" to members of the Var-
sit y baseball, track and tennis teamps.
Captain "Hal" Smith of the track
team and Captain George Labadie of
the basebtll team may be called upon
for short talks in behalf of the mem-
bers of their respective teams.
The speaking portion of the pro-
gram will be short and snappy, so as
to allow enough time for the musical
numbers by the Varsity band and
Midnight Sons' Quartet.
Prof. F. W. Kelsey home front East
Prof. F. W. Kelsey has returned to
Ann Arbor from Washington, where
he represented the university at the
recent congress of. "A League to En-
force Peace."

the great war.
It has been sid that the German
government promoted the alarming zle-
ports of a food shortage months ago
with a view of misleading her ene-
mies. This idea is entirely unfounded.
If this were the case it would not be
possible .for the German authorities
to stage food riots throughout the
country with thousands of women and
children waiting all night in front of
the provision stores, nor would the
ever-growing discontent of the people,
apparent on all sides, have assumed
such great proportions as it has now
reached.
There is no question that the. food
shortage is alarming and that the sit-
uation is critical.
F.AIVANDERLIP FAVORS TEDDY
New Ygrk Bank President Thinks Pre.
parednes WTesar '
New York, May 31.-The first dec-
laration of the sentiment among the
recognized leaders of the country's fi-
nances In Wall Street was made today
by Frank A. Vanderlip, president of
the National City bank, in favor of
Theodore Roosevelt.
"I am for Roosevelt," he said. "I
admit that I was not some months ago,
but I have come to believe that Roose-
velt voices the one great principle
that politics has to deal with in this
campaign. The necessity for prepared-
ness overshadows everything else."
High School Class to Visit University
The graduating class of Tekonsha
high school will visit Ann Arbor and
the university on Saturday, June 10.

Union Nominations,
President-Staats M. Abrams,
'17E, Kemp S. Burge, '17, Fer-
ris H. Fitch, '17L, Glenn M.
Coulter, '16-'18L.
Recording Secretary--Lee E.
Josiyn, '17, Harold A. Taylor,
'17E.
Vice-President for the Literary
School-A, S. Hart, '17, H. x.
G. Muzzy, '17, E. B. Palmer,
'17.
Vice-President for the Engineer-
ing College-R. W. Collins, '17E,
J. W. Neumann, '17E, Gordon
Smith, '17E.
Vice-President for the Law
School - Kenneth Barnard,
'17L, James Barrett, '16-19L,
Glenn A. Howland, '17L.
Vice-President for the Medical
School - Joseph A. Darnall,
'18M, Geo. McClure, '17M.
Vice-President for the Combined
Colleges-C. B. Mandeville,
'17H, Edwin W. Crysler, '17P.
Board of Directors
For Faculty Member-Dean len-
ry M. Bates, Dr. Reuben Pe-
terson, Prof. Wm. A. Frayer.
Athletic Association
For Baseball Manager: elect one.
Thepdpre S. Cox, '17, Glenn A.
Howland, '17L, Howard G.
Muzzy, '17.
For Assistant Baseball Mana-
gers: elect four.
Coan T. Adams, '18, Paul M.
Ireland, '18, George W. Myers,
'18, Stephen G. Pratt, '18E,
Jasper B. Reid, '18, Alfred M.
Shearer, '18, Harold M. Ste-
phen, '18E, Frederick C. Van
Brunt, '18E.
For Intercollege Manager: elect
one.
Willis Brodhead, '17E, James
E. Chenot, '16-'19L.
For Assistant Intercollege Mana-
gers: elect four.

Arthur T. Heuer, '17, Carl Neu-
mann. '18, Harry T. Porter,
'1SE, Shalton Shartel, '18, Leo
Tattersall, '18E.
For Track Manager: elect one.
Julian S. Burrows, '17E, John
E. Sanders, '17L.
For Assistant Track Managers:
elect four.
Ilenry S. Bohling, '18, William
S. 1,widdie, '18E, Elbridge G.
Dudley, '18E, Albert C. Foley,
'18, Herbert A. Gustin, '18, God-
die F. Phillipp. '18, James M.
Taylor, '18, Frederick J.
Thieme, Jr., '18E.
-ar Interscholastic Manager.
Gordon Smith, '17E, W. Lee
Veaton, '17E'.
For Assistant Interscholastic
Managers: elect four.
It. B. Godfreyson, '18, D. T.
Mosier, '18, D. C. Davidson,
'18, E. C. Schacht, '18E, C. R.
Sabin, '18E, C. W. Fischer, '18,
H. Foster, '18, R. M. Langley,
'18E.
For Board in(M ntrol of Student
Pblications : elect three.
Yaney Altsheler, '17, Don
Smith, '17E, Geo. Caron, '17L,
Stanley Smith, '17, Tom C.
Reid, '17, Lamar Kishlar, '17,
James Barrett, '16-'19L, Harry
Gault, '17L.
Women's Judiciary Council
For Senior Members-Margaret
Bassett, '17, Anita Kelly, '17.
For Junior Members - Pansy
Blake, '18, Frieda McClellan,
'18, Valora Quinlan, '18.
For Sophomore Members-Mar-
garet Hurst, '19, Margaret Ad-
dison, '19, Ida Belle Guthe, '19,.
For Student Councilmen at
Large: elect three.
M. L. Dunne, '17L, Harold
O'Brien, '17, Stanley Smith,
'17, H. K. White, '17, E. R. Syl-
vester, '17. and J. Meade, '17E.

Roosevelt Scores
All Hyphenates
Makes Three Speeches in Which He
Denounces German-
Americans
St. Louis, May 31.-Colonel Roose-
velt spent a busy day here today mak-
ing three speeches in which he de-
nounced the German-American alli-
ance as an anti-American alliance. He
roundly scored all hyphenates, assert-
ing that the leaders of the German-
American alliance who seek to coerce
public men are guilty of moral trea-1
son.
His speech at the City club in thei
afternoon was the only one of the
three prepared in advance. In thisl
speech he added a special denuncia-
tion of the German-American alliances
in St. Louis for voting down a pro-1
posal to take part in the preparedness
parade which will be held here June 3.
Roosevelt's first speech of the day1
was made at breakfast at the Planter's£
hotel, where he was taken immediately
after his arrival. In his talk, the
colonel devoted most of his time to1
taking issue with President Wilson'st
Memorial Day address,
To Hold Interclass Pentathlon Today
The interclass pentathlon will start
at 3:00 o'clock this afternoon. The
entire list of events will be staged
today. In order to carry this out, all
entrants should report promptly at the
hour set for the opening of the meet.
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and viein-I
ity: Colder and clouy
TODAYl
9:45 o'clock to 4:15 o'clock--All-
Campus Election, Main Corrdor, Uni-
versity h1l
'0 clok-". Cabinet meeting,1
Newberry ha,1
7:00 o'lock - Alpha Nu meets,
roomns, i-hall.
7:30 o'clock-Poetry club meets, 202
South Wing, Prof. M. P. Tilley willj
speak on Robert Frost.
7x130 o'clock-Girls' Lower Section of
Deutscher Verein meets, rooms, U-hall.
8:00 o'clock-Last Glee club concert,
Hill auditorium.
TOMORROW
3:00 o'cloec - Women's field day,
women's athletic field,
4:0i Q'clok--Notre Dame vs. Michi-
gan, baseball game, Ferry field.
Cgp Ntgf
U-NOTICES
Coupon used in voting for officers
in today's election is No. 32.
Important meeting of ike commit-
tee for Cap Night at the Michigan
Union, 4: 30 o'clock today.

London, May 31.-The German of-
fensive west of the Meuse in the Ver-
dun region is being relentlessly pres-
sed and bit by bit the French are be-
ing forced back. In a series of pow-
erful attacks, the Crown Prince last
night drove southward to within six
miles of the northwest gate of Ver
dun, the nearest approach of the Ger-
mans on the west bank of the Meuse
since the titanic struggle for the fort-
ress began 100 days ago. Kaiser Wil-
helm is reported to be returning to the
Verdun front to witness the final as-
sault which is believed to bexnear.
Nothing in Peace Report
Premier Asquith stated in the House
of Commons today in answer to a
question put by Sir Arthur B. Mark-
ham, liberalist member from Notting-
hamshire, that there was nothing in the
report made by Dr. von Bethmann-oll-
weg that indicated that Germany was
preparing to consider terms of peace
which. would safeguard the interest
of the entente allies and the future
peace of Europe.
Churchill Again Scores Kitchener
Earl Kitchener's conduct of the
British war office was made the tar-.
get for another attack today by Win-
ston Churchill, former first lord of the
admiralty. Mr. Churchill demanded to
know where the millions of men were
that had been raised by Great Britain
for her army. He charged the war-
office with grave mismanagement, in-
(Continued on Page Six)
NEW YORK BANK PIKS MEN
C. C. Ashbaugh and W. J. Edwards
to Enter Training School
Word was- received yesterday from
the National City bank of New York,
by Professor G. W. Dowrie, that C. C.
Ashbaugh and W. J. Edwards had
been chosen to enter its training school'
this summer, Edwards was named
from the sophomore group, while Ash-:
baugh was chosen from the men in the
senior group. One other man from the
sophomore group received speeial
commendation by the bank, and per-
haps will be also chosen to enter the
bank's employ this vacation, if the.
school is not then overcrowded.
Only ten men in the undergraduate
class can be chosen from all the Amer-
ican universities. The men will leave
for New York on June 21, and will
start work immediately.
LAST CHANCE TO PAY DIPLOMA
FEES TO TREASURER TODAY
Today is the last day for the pay-
ment of diploma fees at the offices of
the treasurer, which closes at 4:00
o'clock. The first coupon must be re-
turned without delay to the secretary
of the school or college. It'is advised
that if anyone is in doubt as to whe-
ther he is to receive his degree in
June or July, he had better pay and
be safe, for his money will be re-
funded if the degree is not conferred
at that time.
FRESH TENNIS TEAM BEATS
DETROIT COLLEGE OF LAW
In a featureless match, the All-Fresh
tennis squad shut out the- Detroit Col
lege of Law racquet wielders, 3 to 0,
on the Ferry field courts yesterday aft-
ernoon. The visitors never had a
chance with the fast-going yearlings.
Summaries: Knoche (M) d. Byer (D),
6-3, 6-1; Steketee (M) d. Meisheimer
(D), 6-3, 6-3; 'Knoche and Steketee
'(M) d. Byer and Meisleimer (D), 6-4,
3-6, 6-1.

BILL

LIA

'

' 14E

Miohigan's Greatest Specialty Artist, will appear in
TR IP C NC E RT

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.
b
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x,
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^

Hear the Rag Pickers and Midnight Sons
AT THE
Trip cert

ii
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m -M In A& m d1b

lr- lot. lr& -UPR& Im

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