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May 31, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-31

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THE DAILY
xO
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
'lE CAMPUS

Nwi i 1 1 rr Y w..yr ll wll IIY 1 l "
OP.

Phones :--jitorial 2414
Bhisiness 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL XXVI. No. 171. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 31, 1916. 1PRICE FIVE CEl

F r

ANNOUNCE EVENTS
IN 1916SCHEDUL
OF BIG REGATTA
WILL EE hIELD ON HURON RIVER
ABOVE BARTON DAM
ON JUNE 10
ENTRIES DUE THURSDAY JUNE 8
Canoe and Swimming Races and Fancy,
Diving Slated for Afternoon
Carnival in Evening
Announcement has just been made of
the schedule of events for the annual
Boat club regatta to be held Saturday,
June 10, on the river just above Bar-
ton dam. As in former years, the
afternoon program will consist of
canoe and swimming races, together
with a series of exhibitions of plain
and fancy diving.
The canoe races, with the exception
of the long handicap race beginning at
a point several miles up the river,
will be limited to short, snappy con-
tests, none of them being run over a
course of more than 2,000 feet.
The same poicy has been followed
in planning the swimming events, with
the idea that the shorter races enliven
the meet and prove of more interest
to the spectators.
An entrance fee of 25 cents will be
charged each man for each event. All
ontries must be in by 6:00 o'clock on
-Th rsday, June 8. Participants will
lave names and fees at Huston's and
fill out the regular entrance slips
which have been provided. Prizes in
the form of cups, medals, or ribbons
will be given for first, second and
third places in each contest.
In the evening, beginning about
7:30 o'clock, the annual water carni-
val will be held under the direction of
Abe S. Hart, '17. The feature of the
evening will be the water parade con-
sisting of floats contributed by vari-
ous campus societies, illuminated ca-
noes, and a number of feature floats
arranged by the Boat club. A large
cup donated by a State street mer-
chant will go to the owner of the best
decorated float. The names of the
judges for the contests will be an-
nounced later.
Following is the list of events, as
scheduled: Canoe races-500 ft. sin-
gles, 500 ft, doubles, 1,000 ft. singles,
1,000 ft. doubles, 2,000 ft. doubles, 2,000
ft. fours; swimming-40 yard, 100
yard, 220 yard, and 100 yard breast
stroke. Regulations for the diving
contests will be published as soon as
outlined by the committee in charge.
All who are anticipating entering the
canoe or swimming races should get
in touch with Irving S. Toplon, '17, or
F. J. Wurster, '17, respectively. H. G.
Muzzy, '17, is acting as general chair-
man of the regatta.
CAPR IGHT PLANS READY
Faculty Speaker Only Part of Program
Not Yet Arranged
Practically all arrangements for
Cap Night have been completed, the
student council committee announced
yesterday, with the exception of the
faculty speaker who has not as yet
been secured. The red fire to be used
in the torchlight procession of the four
classes, the boxes to be consumed in
the big blaze and something more than
1600 freshmen caps are awaiting the

big ceremonies of Friday night.
Arrangements for the affair are be-
ing carried out under the direction of
H, A. Taylor, '17E, and V. E. Burnett,
'17. F. F. tMcKinney, '1614, is to be
master of ceremonies.
Province Declares Its Independence
Shanghai, China, May 30. - The
province of Hu-Nan declared its inde-
pendence yesterday. Hu-Nan is an in-
land province, drained by the south-
ern tributary of the Yangtse river. It
has a population estimated at 22,-
000,000.
Engineers to Elect Councilman
Election of sophomore engineer
representatives to the Student Coun-
cil will be held today in the second
floor corridor of the new engineering
building from 1:00 to 3:00 o'clock. The
following men are nominees: S. S.
Atwood. E. G. Dudley, W. M. McKee.

Dariov Resta Wins
A"t Indianapolis
Crosses Line Two Minutes Ahead of
Nearest Opponent in 300-Mile
Classic
Indianapolis, May 30.-Dario Resta,
the- Italian, crouched over the wheel
of his big French Peugiot, won the
300-mile classic at the Speedway in
which 21 cars started today. He led
his nearest competitor by more than
two minutes. His time was 3:36:10.82,
an average of 83.26 miles an hour.
For the same distance inrlast year's
race, Ralph de Palma averaged 9021t
miles. Resta made only one stop for
tires and gasoline during the entire
race.
ORGANIZE EDCAIO
SOCIETY FOR GI S
Good Scholarship and Aptness in the
Field of Teaching Necessary
for Membershipl
A new club open only to university
women who are specializing in educa-t
tional work has recently been formedE
under the direction of the education1
department of the university.nEligi-
bility qualifications are based on gen-
eral scholarship together with special
aptness in the field of education.
Membership is to be limited to ap-t
proximately 25 seniors, and is to be
determined by the following stan-
dards:
1. The completion of at least twoz
courses in Education in this university.
2. No grade in Education below "B".'
3. One and one-half times. as many
honor points as hours credited in
the university.
4. Pursuing work in the department
of education at the time of election.
5. Unusual qualities of personality
and a pronounced interest in teaching
as a profession.
6. Graduate students majoring in
the department of Education.s
In accordance with the above stan-
dards the following members of senior
class were elected to membership
by the Education staff at its last meet-
ing:
Mildred Bachers, Margaret Black,
Ruth Burkley, Marjorie Carlisle, Fran-
ces Cushing, Luella Gallmeyer, Mar-
tha Gray, Jean Hughes, Mary Johns.,
Marguerite Kerns, Ruth Kreger, Gla-
dys Laufman, Helen C. McDonald,
Madge Mead, Catherine Regan, Nellie
Rosewarne, Leola Royce, Ruth Senff,
Florence Snyder, Ruth Trombley, Hel-
en Vanderveer, Jemima Wenley, Ruth
Elliott.
The candidates selected have organ-
ized in a formal way and are at pres-
ent formulating a constitution and by-
laws for the society.
CAMPUS ELECTION TOMORROW
Students Must Bring Athletic Books;
Hours from 9:4 to 4:00
Michigan's second All-Campus Elec-
tion will be held tomorrow. The elec-
tion will be held in the main corridor
of University hall, from 9:45 to 4:00
o'clock. The organizations which will
participate in the election are the
Michigan Union, board in control of
student publication, Women's Judi-
ciary Council, and athletic association,
while three student councilmen will
be chosen from the campus at large,
This will be the first time that student

councilmen will be nominated from
the campus at large and at a general
election,
Athletic books must be presented to
vote for student officials of the ath-
letic association, while Union mem-
bership cards must be presented to
vote for the Michigan Union officials.
Students will be elected to fill all
the positions except those on the fac-
ulty board of directors of the Union.
CALIFORNIA WANTS A L U X N U S
Dr. A. E. Hinsdale, '05, '0611, Offered
Chair of Materlar edica.
Dr. A. E. Hinsdale, '06, '06H, who
is now Professor of Materia Medica
and Therapeutics at Ohio State uni-
versity, has recently been offered a
similar position in the University of
California which he is seriously con-
sidering. Dr. Hinsdale is a son of
Dr. Wilbert B. Hinsdale of this city.

VARSITY 'BAND TO
PLAY ATPEPmFEST
Big Mass Meeting Planned for Friday
in Honor of Interscholastic
Athletes

YEARLINS TAK
GAME FRO~M YPSI
Normal Nine Loses by 6 to 1Score in
Contest With All-Fresh; Gather
14 Hits from Austin

MIDNIGHT SONS ON THE PROGRAM GLENN F A N S 18 NORMIALITES

Michigan's Varsity band has been
secured to stir up the "pep" at next
SSaurday's "Farewell" mass meeting
in Hill auditorium, which has been
arranged chiefly for the visiting In-
terscholastic athletes.
In addition to the band artists, the
Midnight Sons' Quartet has consented
to render several of the inimitable
numbers for which it is famous. Har-
ry Carlson will sing the popular new
Michigan song from Tres Rouge,
"Men of the Maize and Blue."
While the program arranged for
the yell-fest will in part be in the
nature of a musical concert, these
numbers will not overshadow the real
purposes of the gathering, and the ef-
fort of .the combined student body in
a snappy, old-time mass meeting,
which heretofore has been confined
to the fall football season, is expect-
ed to send the visiting high school men
back to their homes with the desire
in their hearts to assume an active
part in Michigan -student. life..
Other universities throughout the
country, which have used the Inter-
scholastic as a means of attracting
athletes, have had their entire stu-
dent body on hand at the time of the
meet to show the youths a real
glimpse of college life, and Michigan
is taking a further step this year in
showing them the Wolverine "spirit"
at its best as displayed at the Hill au-
ditorium get-together.
Four Killed When Awning Falls
Dallas, Tex., May 30.-Four people
were killed and fifteen injured when
an awning fell on a crowd that was
watching the Dallas preparedness pa-
rade this afternoon.

Michigan's All-Fresh baseball team
settled accounts with Ypsilanti Nor-
oral in a highly pleasing and entirely
satisfactory fashion yesterday after-
noon, winning 6 to 1.
The distinct feature of the game was
Glenn's excelM-nt twirling. He struck
out no less than 18 men, falling just
one short of Parks' mark of 19 against
the Polish Seminary.
The freshmen attacked Austin with
commendable vigor right from the
start, and they piled up 14 safe thumps.
Glenn was the only yearling to go hit-
less and any man who strikes out 18
in one game is automatically granted
the irrevocable privilege of going hit-
less for a full season if he so desires.
Ypsi counted in the eighth, after the
Michigan youngsters had the game
will in hand. McIntosh accidentally
chanced to be swinging right where
one of Glenn's curves was-destined to
cross the plate, and he smote a double
into left field. Torrey batted for the
pitcher anid walked. after a wild pitch
had placed McIntosh on third. Mor-
rison flung one into center field when
Torrey stole, and McIntosh triumph-
(Continued on Page Six)
Student Masons to Dance Saturday
The annual spring party of the
Craftsman club, an organization of-
student Masons, will be held next Sat-
urday, June 3, in the Masonic temple.
The dance will be informal, and all
Masons in the university, whether
members of the club or not, are in-
vited to attend. Dancing will begin
at 8:30 o'clock . The price of admit-
tance has not been announced since
it will consist of a per capita "tax"
just large enough to cover the actual
expenses -of the party.

Ann Arborownors
Its War Veterans
Varsity Band Leads Big Parade to
Court House Square; W. H. Poole
of Jackson Makes Address
Led by the Varsity band, company I,
31st Infantry M. N. G., and companies
A and B of the university battalions,
Ann Arbor's Civil War veterans paid
tribute to their dead yesterday fore-
noon.
Directly following the automobiles
bearing the veterans came other ma-
chines containing members of the
Woman's Rights club, city officials,
Knights'- Templar, Maccabees and La-
dies of the Maccabees. These were
followed by the Perry school band,
which furnished music for the large
number of high school and grade pu-
pils directly following.
At the court house after the parade
the' crowd listened to an address by
W. H. Poole of Jackson, after which
the soldiers strewed flowers on the
monument in court house square.
After the close of the meeting a
firing squad fired three volleys. There
was no formal service at the cemetery.
A short service was held at the Broad-
way street bridge in honor of the sol-
dier-sailor dead.
PROF SCHOLL OBJECTS
TO GERMANPROPAGANDA

ROOSEVELT GETS
GOOD0 RECEPTION
IN KANSAS CIT

ENORJfOUS CROWD GATHERS
HEAR COLONEL'S APPEAI
"TO A)IERICANS"
BYSTANDER THROWS KH

TO

Drunken Spectator Is Seized
Attempt to Injure Colonel
Way to Hotel

A
on

rublishes Letter in New York
Saying It Misleads Critics
German-Americans

Times
of

i

CAMPUS ELECTION DAY
DATE: THURSDAY, JUNE 1
TIME: 9:45 A. M. TO 4:00 P. M.
PLACE CORRIDOR OF U-HALL
NOMINEES

Union Nominations
President-Staats M. Abrams,
'17E, Kemp S. Burge, '17, Fer-
ris H. Fitch, '17L, Glenn M..
Coulter, '16-'18L.
Recording Secretary-Lee E.
Joslyn, '17, John W. Langs,
'17, Harold A. Taylor, '17E.
Vice-President for the Literary
School-A. S. Hart, '17, H. G.
G. Muzzy, '17, E. B. Palmer,
'17.
Vice-President for the Engineer-
ing College-R. W. Collins, '17E,
J. W. Neumann, '17E, Gordon
Smith, '17E.
Vice-President for the Law
School - Kenneth Barnard,
'17L, James Barrett, '16-'19L,
Glenn A. Howland, '17L.
Vice-President for the Medical
School - Joseph A. Darnall,
'18M, Geo. McClure, '17M.
Vice-President for the Combined
Colleges-C, B. Mandeville,
'17H,
Board of Directors
For Faculty Member-Dean Har-
ry M. Bates, Dr. Reuben Pe-
terson, Prof. Wm. A. Frayer.
Athletic Association
For Baseball Manager: elect one.
Theodore S. Cox, '17, Glenn A.
Howland, '17L, Howard G.
Muzzy, '17.
For Assistant Baseball Mana-
gers: elect four.
Coan H. Adams, '18, Paul M.
Ireland, '18, George W. Myers,
'18, Stephen G. Pratt, '18E,
Jasper B. Reid, '18, Alfred M.
Shearer, '18, Harold M. Ste-
phen, '18E, Frederick C. Van
Brunt, '18E.
For Intercollege Manager: elect
one.
Willis Brodhead, '17E, James
E. Chenot, '16-'19L.
For Assistant Intercollege Mana-
gers: elect four.

Arthur T. Heuer, '17, Carl Neu-
mann, '18, Harry T. Porter,
'18E, Shalton Shartel, '18, Leo
Tattersall, '18E.
For Track Manager: elect one.
Julian S. Burrows; '17E, John
E. Sanders, '17L.
For Assistant Track Managers:
elect four.
Henry S. Bohling, '18, William
S. Dinwiddie, '18E, Elbridge G.
Dudley, '18E, Albert C. Foley,
'18, Herbert A. Gustin, '18, God-
die F. Phillipp, '18, James M.
Taylor, '18, Frederick 3.
Thieme, Jr., '18E..
For Interscholastic Manager.
Gordon Smith, '17E, - W. Lee
Watson, '17E.
For Assistant Interscholastic
Managers: elect four.
R. B. Godfreyson, '18, D. T.
Mosier, '18, 15. C. Davidson,
'18, E. C. Schacht, '18E, C. R.
Sabin, '18E, C. W. Fischer, '18,
H. Foster, '18, R. M. Langley,
'18E.
For Board in Control: elect three
Yancy Altsheler, '17, Don
Smith, '17E, Geo. Caron, '17L,
Hanley Smith, '17, Tom C.
Reid, '17, Lamar Kishlar, '17E,
James Barrett, '16-'19L, Harry
Gault, '17L.
Women's Judiciary Council
For Senior Members-Margaret
Bassett, '17, Anita Kelly, '17.
For Junior Members -Pansy
Blake, '18, Frieda McClellan,
'18, Valora Quinlan, '18.
For Sophomore Members-Mar-
garet Hurst, '19, Margaret Ad-
dison, '19, Ida Belle Guthe, '19.
For Student Councilmen " at
Large: elect three.
M. L. Dunne, '17L, Harold
O'Brien, '17, Stanley Smith,
'17, H. K. White, '17, , E R.
Sylvester, '17, and J. Meade,
'17E.

In an article entitled "The German-t
American's Hallucination," which ap-
peared in the New York Times re-a
cently, Prof. J. W. Scholl, of the Ger-a
man department, defends the Ger-a
man-American agaihst the attacks{
which have been directed against him
since the beginning of the war. Prof.f
Scholl- points out that the German-r
American has not the power that itI
is said he threatens to use so disloy-
ally, and remarks that "there is not
the' slightest hope in regard to a pro-E
German interpretation of Americang
neutrality."
He points out that there is little
reason why the greater part of the{
Americans of Teutonic descent should
favor the fatherland in this struggle,t
because many of them came over toT
this country in pre-revolutionaryt
times, many are descended from the
"liberals and radicals who left despot-f
ic governments in Germany from 1828
to 1850," and still others came from;
he southern kingdoms of Germany andr
can therefore "have no sentimental at-
tachment at all for the house of Ho-
henzollern.".
Professor Scholl attributes the pre-
valent opinion that many men of Ger-
man descent favor the central powersJ
to a skillful propaganda which has
been creating "a type of sentiment
among German-Americans that has no
(Continued on Page Six)'
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ty: Probably cloudy.
TODAY
' 4:00 o'clock-J-tits vs. senior engi-
neers, baseball, South Ferry field.
7:00 o'clock-Second combined se-
nior sing, steps of Memorial hall.
7:15 o'clock-Canadian club smoker
and meeting, Union. Election of offi-
cers.
TOMORROW
8:00 o'clock-Last Glee club concert,
Hill auditorium.
9:45 o'clock to 4:00 o'clock-All-
Campus Election, Main Corridor, Uni-
versity hall.
U-NOTICES
Baseball practice for senior lits to-
day, 3:30 o'clock. Game called at
4:00 o'clock.
Band rehearsal tonight in University
hall at 7:00 o'clock.
The senior lit invitation committee
wishes to inform its class that the few
announcements left will be put on
sale to anyone who will buy them
Wednesday from 1:00 to 2:30 o'clock
in the main 'corridor of University,
hall. The committee feels that- suffi-
cient notice has been given those who
have not called for their order to
warrant this general saTe

Kansas City, Mo., May 30.-Colonel
Roosevelt brought his message of
Americanism to Kansas City today,
where more than 10,000 people gave
him an enthusiastic recebption.
They were "all Americans together,"
as Colonel Roosevelt told the people
when he made the first speech in the
lobby of 'the Hotel Muehlbach.
"I have come here on Decoration
Day because I want to appeal to the
patriotism of the west, where there -
are people of the right sort and where
they respond," the Colonel said.
"What I am afraid of -is lack of
preparedness which would render pat-
riotism useless. Without prepared-
ness, our courageous men would die
in far greater numbers and to less
avail than with it. I am appealing
for preparedness, not to bring on war,
but to avoid it, and to wage war with
less bloodshed if it is ever impossible
to avert it."
Afterward the ex-president made
an address to the Commercial club
and then took up the Memorial Day
address, which was virtually the
Colonel's keynote for the 1916 cam-
paign. In it he covered everything
from preparedness to the tariff. Pri-
marily it was an appeal for prepared-
ness. It was a bitter indictment of
defenselessness, of Henry Ford (not
by name though by unmistakable ref-.
erence), of the administration's policy,
and of social oppression.
The only incident to mar an other-
wise perfect day occurred when a
drunken man threw a knife at the
Colonel while he was on his way to
the hotel from the railroad station.
Mr. Roosevelt paid little attention to
the incident. No stringent prosecution
of the man who threw the knife will
follow, it is thought.
The Colonel left at 11:00 o'clock for
St. Louis, where he will deliver an
address tomorrow noon.
DAILY PLANS BIG CAMPAIGN
Alumni Offered Reduction on Daily if
They Sign Up This Spring
The business staff of The Daily will
start a campaign this week among the
seniors for subscriptions for next year.
Tables will be placed around the cam-
pus on Friday and Saturday of this
week for the convenience of those se-
niors who wish to buy their subscrip-
tions now. This is the first time such
a campaign has been made by the
staff.
Owing to the fact that The Daily is
the best means of alumni keeping in
touch with the doings of the univer-
sity, it is thought that a large num-
ber of seniors will sign up this week.
A special rate is being given to 1916
graduates during June of $2.50 for
next year, for out-of-town subscrip-
tions instead of $3.00 as it will be
after July 1.
DR. HINSDALE TO OFFICIATE
AT HOWELL COMMENCEMENT
Dean Wilbert B. Hinsdale, of the
Homeopathic Medical school, will go
to Howell Thursday evening to offi-
ciate at the graduating exercises at
the State Tuberculosis Training
school.
The members of the junior class of
the Homeopathic school will also
journey to Howell in the near future
to inspect the state sanatorium for
tubercular people which is located in
that city.
. Dr. Wilbert B. Hinsdale will go to

Hiram, Ohio, on June 13, to give an
address before the Alumni association
of Hiram college which is situated in
that city. Dr. Hinsdale graduated
I - fr m Tr m n l Y t 1- «. -

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