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May 28, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-28

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THE DAILY
;0oc
NEWS OF THE WORLD ANDI
THE CAMPUS

. J , of
K
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.

Phones :-Mlitorial 2414
Business 960
TELEVRAPI SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 169.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 28, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

.......

CORNELL SECOND
* TICTOR IN
EASTERN C LSSIC
MEREDITH BREAKS WORLD AND
COLLEGIATE MARKS IN QUAR-
TER AND HALF
SMITH WINS CENTURY DASH
Foss Vaults 13:2 7-8 in Exhibition; Red
and White Take Four Places
in Two-Mile Run
Cambridge, Mass., May 27.-Cornell
for the second time in as many years
proved herself supreme in the track
world this afternoon. The Red and
White scored 45 points.
The captains of three or the com-
peting teams captured all the indi-
vidual glory, Meredith of Pennsylva-
nia broke. the world's record in the
quarter on a circular track, and put
up a new intercollegiate record in the
880-yard run. Murray of Stanford set'
up a 15-second record in the high hur-
dles, and took away the low hurdles
as well. "Hal" Smith of Michigan
won the century and finished a scant
yard in the rear of Moore of Prince-
ton in the furlong. 'I
"Ted" .Meredith annihilated Long's
record of 47 4-5 seconds made in 1900,
by making the distance in 2-5 of a
second faster, but the .mark of 47
seconds of Long on a straight track
still stands. The wonderful Quaker
also made Caldwell's mark of two
years ago in the half go out of the
records, when he took two-fifths of a
second from the Cornellian's time of
1:53 2-5. Murray hung up a mark of
15 seconds in the high hurdles.
Foss of Cornell won the pole vault,
going over the timber at 12 feet, 8 in-
ches, and later broke all records by
clearing the cross bar at 13 feet 2 7-8
inches. This mark is disputed.
Windnagle, of Cornell, missed John
Pgul Jones' mark in the mile by less
than a second, covering the course in
4:15, Carroll, of the Wolverines, came
in second in 1 2-5 seconds slower.
Cornell took the first four places in
the two-mile when Corwirth made up
60 yards in the last lap on Putnam of
Yale, and came to the tape in fourth
position. *4
The summaries:
880-yard dash-Meredith (Penn,),
first; Bingham (Har.), second; 8oud-
der (Penn.), third; Taylor (Cor.),
fourth; Peterson (Syr.), fifth. Time,
1 minute, 53 seconds. New intercol-
legiate record.
16-pound hammer throw-Gilder-
sleeve (Cal.), first. 155 feet. 1 inch:
Ledbetter (Bowdoin), second, 152 feet,
4 inches; Richardson (Cal.), third, 150
feet, 9 1-2 inches; Hagerman (Cor.),
fourth, 142 feet, 3 1-2 inches; Spears
(Dart,), fifth, 141 feet,
(Continued on Page Six)

Dentist JBreaks{
When Convicted
Waite Can't Preserve Poise as Jury
Finds him Guilty of First
Degree Murder
New York, May 27.-Arthur War-
ren Waite was speedily convicted ofI
murder in the first degree this after-I
noon. It required but one hour and
23 minutes for the jury in the criminal
branch of the supreme court to record
its formal decision.
Waite endeavored to r9ceive the ver-
dict with the same poise and indiffer-
ence that enabled him to go upon the
witness stand and confess two murders
and the planning of at least two more,
but he could not prevent the mottled
flush which crept up into his face,
the reddening of his eyes, nor his body
from swaying slightly.
"I don't see what kept them so
long!" he exclaimed. "They could
have decided it in 15 minutes. The
whole thing was a farce. The trial
:aught not to have lasted more than
an hour altogether."
MANY MUSIAL LIGHTS
WILL YANISH NEXT YEAR

YARSRY CONQUEIRS
AGGIS;_SORE5-3
Michigan 3Ioundsmen Allow 1() Bin-
gles; Nieman Makes Three Hits;
Play Errorless Ball
WIN IN NINTI1 ANNING RALLY
Before the largest audience gathered
at East Lansing this season, the reor-
ganized Wolverine nine succeeded in
wiping out some of the sting of last
fall's gridiron defeat when they hand-
ed the Aggies a 5-3 beating yesterday
afternoon.
Miller, opening the game for the
Lundgrenites,. allowed eight scattered
hits in his seven inning term of duty,
and Robins, pitching the other two,
held the farmer team to two hits. The
M. A. C. coach employed the same tac-
tics with his hurlers, Brown, the
southpaw, allowing four hits, and De-
mond, his successor, allowing seven.
An air-tight infield played a large
part in the Wolverine victory, not
an error being chalked up against the'
Wolverines, wlereas the M. A. C. took
three of the demerits.
Niemann's hitting was the bright
spot in the game from a Michigan
standpoint, the little fielder gathering
three beauties, and scoring one earned
run for the Varsity.
The score stood a 3-3 tie up to the
ninth inning, when Michigan cinched
the game with two runs by Labadiq
and Harrington. Labadie assumed his
usual stellar role, making two hits and
two.runs.
(Continued on Page Six)

[BACK IAINLINE
Will Carry Fighting to Open Plains in
Attempt to Force Battle or
Retreat
'FRENCh VWCThRS AT ('U3IEIIES
London, May 27.-The center of the
Austrian army , sweeping down the
Arso valley, has battered down the
outer fortifications of-the Italian city
of Arisero, while a strong force to the
west is less than 10 miles from Schio.
These two points are the northern
terminals of the Venice-Vicenza rail-
road, so that the Austrian advance of
the last. 24 hours adds eminently to the
menace of its immediate objective,
Vicenza.
The fR-ghting is about to be carried
from the different concentrations to
the open area of the north Italian
plains, the Austrians evidently being
t' terrnined to force upon their oppo-
nents the alternative of making a
stand in the open field of battle or
withdrawing their whole defensive
line, thus removing all danger from
the f'rontier.
Paris, May 27.-In a furious battle
in which the French took the initia-
tine yesterday and which lasted far
into the night, the defenders of Ver-
dun succeeded in wresting from the
Germans the eastern part of the vil-
lage of Cumieres, the strategic point'
on the west bank of the Meuse.
* In addition to regaining this portion
of the village, the French captured
several trenches to the northwest.

3ooo Tell Teddy
They Want Him
Ex-Presideut Welcomes Supporters at
Oyster Bay; Feels Sure He
Is Understood
Oyster Bay, May 27.--Three thou-
sand enthusiastic men and women took
part in the pilgrimage io Sagamore
Hill today to tell Colonel Roosevelt
that they want him for the next Presi-
dent, and the Colonel stood on the
veranda of his home and looked out
over the crowd trampling his lawn
and told them that he understood that
they had pledged themselves to him
only so far as he embodied the prin-
ciples of Americanism.
WOMEN MARCH IN
CAP NIGHT PARHADEi
Aim to Promote Democratic Spirit by
Plan; Eliminate Gauntlet
Running

U.S. PLEDGED TO
A;SSIST IN PEACE,
AT, CLOSE *Of WAR
WILSON ADVOCATES :NEW WORLD
IPOL'Y IN SPEECII BE-
FORE PEACE LEAGUE
WILL PROTECTSMALLNATIONS
President Says That Country Must Be
Prepared to Prevent Future
War in Europe

SPEAKERS TUESDAY

ANNOUNCE

Expect to Fill Hill Auditorium
Final Appearance of Cam-
pus Luminaries

for

"Everyone is working at top speed,
and we have every hope of filling Hill
auditorium to overflowing next Thurs-
day night," said Charles W. Fischer,
'18, campus sales manager for the
concert of the combined musical clubs
last night.
"Despite the handicaps of the clos-
ing weeks of college, and the warm
'weather, the students are manifesting
a great desire not to miss the last ap-
pearance of so many campus musical
stars."
The Rag Pickers' Sextet, three of
whom, Wheeler, Scanlon and Leinin-
ger, play for the last time before a
campus audience, made a great hit on
the western trip. They were every-
(Continued on Page Six)
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

I I

CAMPUS ELECTION DAY
DATE: THURSDAY, JUNE 1
TIME: 9:45 A. M. TO 4:00 P. M.
PLACE CORRIDOR OF UI-HALL ;
NOMINEES

Two of the innovations in the Cap
Night celebration this year were an-
nounced by the student council com-
mittee last night.
For the first time in the history of
the annual festivities, the university
women will march in the procession
according to classes, along with the
men. It is believed that this will not
only promote a greater spirit of de-
mocracy among the men and women
students at the ceremony, but will also
make the event more of an all-univer-
sity affair. In addition, it will tend to
make the usual Cap Night "fussing"
less attractive;.
The other innovation announced is
that the. sophomores 'will be asked to
abstain from paddling the near-second
year men when the latter enter Ob-
servatory 1ollow. This will be ex-
plained to the committee of sopho-
mores having charge of the arrange-
ments, and the council feels sure that
the near-juniors will abstain from this
practice.
Speakers for the Cap bight festiv-
ities are practically all secured, and
the names of the men who will take
part in the annual ceremony will ap-
pear in Tuesday's Daily.
The other innovations on the coun-
cil program will be announced at the>
same time.

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INTERCOLLEGIATE RESULTS
Cornell, 45,
Yale, 29.
Leland Stanford and Califor-
nia, 22.
Pennsylvania, 18.
Dartmouth, 14.
Michigan, 13.
Harvard, 11.
Princeton, 10.
Bowdoin, 5,
Syracuse, 3,
Penn State, 2.
Massachusetts I. T., 1.
* * * * * * * * * * *

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Business len Must Build Public
Health 's Economic Foundation

Union Nominations
President-Staats M. Abrams,
'17E, Kemp S. Burge, '17, Fer-
ris H. Fitch, '17L, Glenn M..
Coulter, '16.
Recording Secretary-Lee E.
Joslyn, '17, John W. Langs,
'17, Harold A. Taylor, '17E.
Vice-President for the Literary
School-A. S. Hart, '17, H. G.
G. Muzzy, '17, E. B. Palmer,
'17.
Vice-President for the Engineer-
ing College-R. W. Collins, '17E,
J. W. Neumann, '17E, Gordon
Smith, '17E.
Vice-President for the Law
School - Kenneth Barnard,
'17L, James Barrett, '16-'19L,
Glenn A. Howland, '17L.
Vice-President for the Medical
School - Joseph A. Darnall,
'18M, Geo. McClure, '17M.
Vice-President for the Combined
Colleges--C. B. Mandeville,
'17H.
Board of Directors
For Faculty Member-Dean Har-
ry M. Bates, Dr. Reuben Pe-
terson, Prof. Wm. A. Frayer.
Athletic Association
For Baseball Manager: elect one.
Theodore S. Cox, '17, Glenn A.
Howland, '17L, Howard G.
Muzzy, '17.
For Assistant Baseball Mana-
gers: elect four.
Coan H. Adams, '18, Paul M.
Ireland, '18, George W. Myers,
'18, Stephen G. Pratt, '18E,
Jasper B, Reid, '18, Alfred M..
Shearer, f18, Harold M. Ste-J
phen, '18E, Frederick C. Vanr
Brunt, '18E.
For Intercollege Manager : elect
one.
Willis Brodhead, '17B James

E. Chenot, '16-19L.
For Assistant Intercollege Mana-
gers: elect four.
Arthur T. Heuer, '17, Carl Neu-
mann, '18, Harry T. Porter,
'18E, Shalton Shartel, '18, Leo
Tattersall, ,'18E.
For Board in Control.'
Yancy Altsheler, '17, Don
Smith, '17E, Geo. Caron, '17L,
Hanley Smith, '17, Tom C.
Reid, '17, Lamar Kishlar, '17E,
James Barrett, '16='19L, Harry
Gault, '17L.
For Track Manager: elect one.
Julian S. Burrows, '17E, John
E. Sanders, '17L.
For Assistant Track Managers:
elect four.
Henry S. Rohling, '18, William
S. Dinwiddie, '18E,. Elbridge G.
Dudley, '18E, Albert C. Foley,
'18, Herbert A. Gustin,;'18,;God-
die F. Phillipp, '18, James M.
Taylor. '18, rederick J.
Thieme,; Jr., 1'SE.
For Intcdqscholastic Manager.
Gordon Smith, '17E, W. Lee
Watson, '17E.
For Assistant Interscholastic
Managers: elect four.
R. B. Godfreyson, '18, D. T.
Mosier. '18, D. C. Davidson,
'18, E. C. Schacht,;'18E, C. R.
Sabin,.'18E, C. W. Fischer, '18,
H. Foster, '18, R. M. Langley,
'i8E.
Women's Judiciary Council
For SeniorMembers-Margaret
Bassett, '17, Anita' Kelly, '17.
For Junior Members -Pansy
Blake, '18, Frieda McClellan,
'18, Valora Quinlan, '18.
For Sophomore Members-Mar-
garet Hurst, '19, Margaret Ad-
dison, '19, Ida Belle- Guthe, '19.

1

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

I- l

Weather forecast for Ann
vicinity: Cloudy.

Arbor and I

Today every university is turning
out many graduates who expect to fol-
low a business career. The public
health movement touches the business
class perhaps more vitally than any
other class, for it touches it on the
economic side and it is only as the
economic side of the movement is
worked out satisfactorily that the
movement will receive the recognition
in the social scheme of things that it I
requires to become thoroughly effec-
tive.
As the State Board of Health work-
ers go from county to county in 1Viche
igan hunting out the hundreds of cases
of tuberculosis, they try to interest all
classes of people and professions. But
when it is all over and done, when
the victims have been found and their
names tabulated, it is the business
element of the county that is appealed
to. When a survey has been held in a
county, and about 200 or 300 tubercu-
losis sufferers have been discovered,
it becomes plain that this worl4 will be
to a large extent wasted unless some-
thing is done to follow it up. Merely
finding cases and doing nothing about
them does not make the ;work of per-
manent value. The finding of cases
shows that a sanatorium has to be
built, that the cities of the county need

Washington, May 27. - President
Nilson practically pledged the United
tates to assist the nations of Europe
n the maintenance of peace after the
var in an address tonight before the
eague to Enforce Peace at the New
eillis hotel.
Initiating as it does an advocacy of
e new world policy for this govern-
rent, the President's address made a
>rofound impression and is regarded
s certain to cause widespread con-
nent here and abroad. No reference
vas made to any plan on the part of
he President to offer mediation now
n the European war.
Mr. Wilson, however, outlined what
he policy of the United States would
>e "if it ever should be in a position
o suggest or initiate a movement
.or peace among the nations at war."
Plainly the purpose of the Presi-
[ent's speech was to further peace agi-
ration and informally to advise the
>elligerents as to what the United
States stands ready to do. The im-
)ortance of the speech is likely to
;ome from the comment and discus-
lion that it will start in Europe.
Inviolability of the smaller. nations'
overeignty, and their territorial in-
tegrity are some of the fundamental
things which the President indicates
this government will hold sacred. The
tdoption by the nation of some feas-
ible scheme to prevent further conflict
is also advocated and promised sup-
port by the President.
If this scheme must be maintained
by force, the President's address is
translatable into meaning that the
United States must be prepared to do
its share toward effectively preventing
future war in Europe, even if it takes
the military forces of the combined
powers to do it.
LATIN-AMERICANS PICK HEADS
Barradas- Reads Paper on Brazil; R.
V. Wann Honorary Member
Jose M. Hernandez, grad., was re-
elected president of the Latin-Ameri-
can Students' club at a meeting of
the club Friday night at the Phi Chi
Delta house. Other officers elected
were: Vice-president, E. G. Guzman;
secretary, G.' A. Covarrubias; treas-
urer, R. S. Caneco; vocalist, E. C. S.
Barradas; and censor, Carlos S. Este-
yes.
E. C. S. Barradas, read a paper on
Brazil, giving its history from its dis-
covery to the establishment of a re-
public, including its colonization and
life under various rules.
Mr. H. V. Wann, of the French de-
partment, was elected to honorary
membership in the club.
GIRLS GLEE CLUB PLEASES
"Sunrise Daughters' Sextette Well Re-
ceived; Mandoln Club Liked.
The Girls Glee club presented a va-
ried program before a large and un-
usually appreciative audience in Sar-
ah Caswell Angell hall last evening.
All the songs were rendered with a
smoothness that shows the results of
many weeks of conscientious rehears-
als.
The "Sunrise Daughters" Sextet
and the mandolin club were extremely
well received, responding to repeated
encores.
This concert was the last of the se-
ries given this year. The officials of
the club h ipe to double the number of
appearances next year.
After the concert an informal dance

as far as possible future cases, that
the county needs a complete health or-
ganization, composed of health officer,
sanitary inspectors, visiting nurses,
etc., for the same purpose. And all
this takes not only money, but takes
business ability. And in proportion
as the best busines ability of a city
or a county is applied to the public
health problem on the economic side,
in that proportion will the public
health movement in that community
be successful Therefore at the end
of each county campaign Dr. Wm. De
Kleine, in charge of this work, ap-
peals to the Chambers of Commerce, to
the common councils, to the business
element of the community, to shoulder
the burden and to effect a health or-
ganization.

TOMORROW
3:30 o'clock - Senior lit baseballt
practice at Ferry field. Game at 4:001
o'clock.
4 :45 ,clock-Adelphi meet at U-
hall and leave for boat house.
9:00 o'clock-Boat club dance. Bar-1
bour gymnasium.'
U-NOTICES
The band will meet Thursday morn-'
ing at 9:15 o'clock at the corner of
Fourth and Huron streets. The men
are expected to wear their blue ,uni-
forms.
Company B of officers' corps will
meet at Engineering arch Monday eve-
ning, 7:20 P. M., rifle drill.
All-Fresh track team will meet Mon-
day at 3:30 o'clock at Ferry field for
picture.
All freshmen desiring to try out for
the position of assistant student mana-
ger of the Varsity band should report
in room M-328, Natural Science build-
ing between 3:15 and 4:00 o'clock on
Monday.

4+ r . .

- - --- ----.

First Methodist Church
State and Washington Streets
A. W. STALKER, D. D., Minister
Rev. A. A. Hicks
of Saline, will be is charge of the

NOTICEI

ToMichit ui Dwily Advertisers
Since Tuesday, May 30 is a Holiday, all
copy for Wednesday', issue should be in by 1
p. M,, Monday, May 29.
The paper will be published Tuesday as
usual.
c

Morning Services, 10:30 -Evening Services7, T:30

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