100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 27, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DAILY .
NEWS OF TILE WORLD AND
TIE CAMPUJS
VOL. XXI. No. 168.

Ci - o
GAN D

Phones :-kjitorial 2414
1usiness 960
ITELERAPL SERVICE BY ThEI
EW YORK, SUN

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 27, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

LAWYER SPEAKS TO
LEGAL SOCIETY ON
WORLDPROBLEM
FREDERICK COUDERT PRESENTS
ASPECTS OF LAW IN
PRESENT WAR
UNITED STATESUNPROTECTED
Deals With Questions of Blockade, ;
Contraband Trade, and Foreign
Shipping
Frederick R. Coudert, the distin-
guished international lawyer, of New
York city, addressed the public meet-!
ing of the Order of the Coif, in Hill
auditorium yesterday afternoon on
"Some Current Problems of Interna-
tional Law." His remarks were
forceful, scholarly and dealt chiefly
with the history and sanction of in-
ternational law and especially its
status in the present war, with the
peculiar interest international law
holds for us now as neutrals, and with
several specific questions concerned
with trade, as contraband, particular-
ly cotton, and blockade.
He made the point that if interna-
tional law did not exist it would have
to be created, because of the relations
of nations to each other as individuall
units. While Rome held sway over
the civilized world, international law
was simply Roman law, and on the
downfall of Rome the church to some
extent succeded to this function of the
empire. International law grew up
(Continued on Page Six)
SENIOR ENGINEERS HOLD SING

Select lien For
Woard Positions

Student Itepresentatives Will
Voted Upon at General
Election

lie

At its meeting held Thursday after-
noon, the board in control of student
publications approved the following
men for candidates as student repre-
sentatives on the board for the year
1916-17: Yancey Altsheler, Don Smith,
George Caron, Stanley Smith, Torn
Reid, Lamar Kishlar, James Barret,
and Harry Gault.
As provided for in the constitution
of the board, all nominees will be
members of the senior class next
year. At the general election day,
to be held June 1, these men will be
voted upon, and three chosen to fill
the offices. Any further nominations
will be accepted if filed with Prof. F.
N. Scott on or before Wednesday,
May 31, at 4:00 o'clock.-
The business manager and manag-
ing editor of the Gargoyle as well as
a business manager for the Michi-
ganensian will be selected during the
first week in June. Positions on the
staff of the Inlander will be chosen
at a later meeting of the board.
Dig Crolvd Hears
Second Concert
Introducing Several New Pieces; Var-
led Program Scores
Success
The Varsity band gave their second
open air concert of the season last
evening at the campus band stand.
One of the largest crowds on the cam-
pus this spring crowded every place
of advantage, filling the benches, gath-
ering around the flag pole and stretch-
ing back to the Medical building.
"Captain" Wilson rendered a very
pleasing and varied program consist--
ing of "Underneath the Stars," "Tales
from Hoffman," and many other favor-
ites. Among the greatest hits of the
evening, however, were several popu-
lar pieces, including "That Michigan
Band," and "A Southern Medley."
Several selections were rendered by
the trombone section of the band
which were encored.
Announce Comniitteemen for Dance
Committeemen in charge of tonight's
University dance at Packard academy
have been announced as follows: Don-
ald W. Sessions, '17L, D. M. Hatch.
'18E. Tickets will be on sale in Uni-
versity hall at 11:00 o'clock this morn-
ing, and at the door tonight after
8:00 o'clock.

FIE MICHIGAN MEN
PLAEFOR TODAYS
INTERCOLLEGIATESI
SMITH SECURES FIRST IN BOTH
D)ASHES; O'BRIEN PLACES
IN CENTURY
UFER AND MURPHY ELIMINATED
Fontania, Cross and Fischer Also
Qualify in Prelim-
inaries
Cambridge, Mass., May 26.-Michi-
gan today qualified five men in six
events for the finals of the eastern
intercollegiates, which will be com-
pleted tomorrow on Soldiers' field.
Captain Smith of the Wolverines,
the present intercollegiate champion
in the dashes, came through both the
sprint heats with first places, and from
indications should be among the heavi-
est point winners in the big day to-
morrow. His team-mate O'Brien also
won his heat in the century.
The other Michigan men to qualify
in the preliminaries were Fontanna,
Cross, and Fischer.
Fontanna came through the quarter
in good style, and looks to 'be able to
boost the Wolverines' total. Fischer
won his heats in the low hurdles, while
Cross, one of the leaders in the shot
putting profession, lived up to ex-.
pectations by heaving the pill far.
enough to be among those who will:
throw the 16-pound shot in the finals.
(ContInued on Page Six)
WOLVERINE MEN TO REPORT
Summer Publication Men to Confer
'With Managers
Preparations for the university sum-
mer paper, The Wolverine, are well
under way. Regular credit may quite
likely be arranged with the summer
school authorities for the upperclass-
men who try out, and newspaper ex-
perience will be given similar credit
to that on The Michigan Daily.
Those anticipating work on the re-
portorial side are requested to confer
with V. E. Burnett, in The Daily offices
between 1:15 and 2:15 this afternoon,
or between 3:00 and 4:00 o'clock Mon-
day afternoon.. Those anticipating
work on the business side of The Wol-
verine are leaving notice to that ef-
fect with C. V. Sellers in The Daily
offices. Either of these men can be
reached by letter, addressed care of
Press building.
HOLMES TO SPEAK BEFORE
CRAFTSMEN THTS EVENNG
Clarence E. Holmes, of Lansing, su-
perintendent of the Michigan School
for the Blind, and acting superintend-
ent of the Lansing public schools, will
be the principal speaker at the annual
May banquet to be given by Craftsmen
at the Masonic temple this eve-
ning at 6:30 o'clock. Paul G. Eger,
'16L, Paul C. Gibson, '18P, and Pro-
fessor John R. Rood, of the Law
school, will respond to toasts. Hen-
ry D. Parker, '16L, will act as toast-
master. Following the banquet, new
officers will be installed by C. E. His-
cock, of Ann Arbor.

Publicist and Lawyer .:Has
lnwerests-nI Problems of
Great lWiar

MarledI

Frederick Rene Coudert, internation-
al law yer, putblicist, educator, business
man,author, :,chevalier Legion d'Hon-
neur, of .France, is all smiles and
warmth and sunshine-except when
tremendously in earnest, when the hu-
mor fades out of his eyes, and every
feature becomes intense. At such
times his hands mechanically search
for his pockets, his feet brace them-
selves, and he begins, "You see, it's
this way-
When questioned as to the circum-
stances under which he received the
cross of the French Legion of Honor,
he daughed. "That's rather a hard thing
to do. You see it is partly hereditary.
Both my father and grandfather were
members of the Legion, and I pre-
sume it was partly on their account..
Of course," he continued, "I have al-
ways been associated with French
affairs, and some seven or eight years
ago, for some little work I did, they,
vwre good enough to honor me. It
(Continued on. Page Six)
Waite Called
"Joral, Idiot

Coudert, As He Is
Off The Platform

GIRLS, GLEE CLUB TO
GIBE CNCRTTONIGHT
Constant Practice Asstures Success;
HoldJ Infornial Dance A ter
Performance
With weeks of continuous practice as
a guarantee of the most finished and
varied concert in years, the Girls' Glee
club will present their annual spring
concert in- Sarah Caswell Angell hall
at 84:00 this evening.
An informal dance in Barbour gym-
nasium will be held at the close of
the concert.
The program is as follows:
Chanson Provencal. Inez Gose, '17
and Club
Dinah ........................ Club
Violin solo, Legend ........ Wieniaski
Lucy Cannon, '18
Sunrise Daughters Quartette .....
Ellen Sargent, '16, Bernice Bor-
dlen.'18, Ruth Kreger, '16, and
Mildred Hill, '18
"From the Land of the Sky-Blue
Water"... ...........Cadman
"Far Off I Hear a Lover's Lute,"
Cadman
"Indian Mountain Song," ...Cadman
Club
Selection from "Kstinka"......
Mandolin club
Selections from Junior Girls' Plays,
1917, 1916, arranged by Ellen Sar-
gent, '16
Glee and Mandolin clubs
Spring Song ...Florence Paddock, '17
Mildred Hill, '18, and club
Miss Nora Crane I-funt . . . Director
Olga Shinkman, '17 ...Accompanist
OHIO CLUB MEN DANCE MONDAY
1'isher's Ban jorine Saxophone Or.
chestra to Furnish Music
"Real Buckeye features" will keep
things on the-move at the Ohio club's
dance at Paclard academy next Mon-
day evening. The sale of tickets has
been limited to forty, but a few more
tickets can still be engaged by call-
mg 799-M or 1855 today.
Dancing will be from 9:00 "to 1:00
o'clock to music by Fisher's Banjor-
ine-Saxophone orchestra. C. R. Bloom-
er, '17E, chairman of the dance com-
mittee, has announced the following
chalperones: Dr. A. L. Ferguson, and
Mrs: Ferguson and Dr. J. E. Harris
and Mrs. Harris.
WHAT'S GOING ON

Allenists Testify That He.
gally Responsible
Ilis.Acts

Is Not Le-
for,

Boilermakers ive Big Selection
Songs on Campus

of

That engineers can make music be-
sides the kind that is produced from
the anvil and the forge was proved last
night when the senior boilermakers
staged their first sing under the elms
at the senior engineer benches. Led
by "Howdy" Keeler the technical men
sang through all of the songs in their
new song book and a number of others
that do not a'ppear in the' book,- in
fact do not appear in print at all.
dThe sing was officially closed with
"Good Night, Ladies," but the song-
sters, being in the mood for free en-
tertainment, traveled over to the Law
building and gathering quietly under
the front entrance serenaded the Laws
with a few cially selected engineer-
ing songs then gave the '16E yell.

New York. May 26.-That Dr. Ar-
thur Warren Waite is a "moral idiot",
and therefore not legally responsible
for the murderof John E. Peck and
Mrs. Peck was the testimony today of
Dr. Morris J. Karpas and Allen Ross
Diefendorf, alienists retained in be-
half of the man on trial before Jus-
tice Shearn in . the criminal" branch
of the supreme court.
Upon their testimony the defendant
bases his entire hopes of escaping the
electric chair, for with them and Miss
Katherine Pecl as a witness on a
collateral matter, his counsel, Walter
R. Deuel, rested his defense tonight.
Miss Katherine Peck, the benefac-
tress of the defendant, went on the
witness stand and confirmed in part'
the defendant's statement that he had
tried to kill her. She remembered the
marmalade incident when Waite says
he filled a jar with ground glass. She
says 'she thought it was sand and
took it back to the grocer and made
him give her another jar.
Due to the speed with which the
trial has progressed, the case will be
placed in the hands of the jury to-
morrow evening.
SENIORS TO CALL FOR CARDS
Monday Set as Last Chance to Secure
Announcement Bids
Only 90 out of the 325 seniors who
ordered announcement bids have failed
to call for them after the cards have
been on sale for four days. On Mon-
day those who have not claimed their
bids may do so from 1:00 to 2:30
o'clock in the corridor of University
hall. After that time the tickets will
go on sale to the general public.
The engineers can get their cards
today outside the Engineering society
rooms from 9:00 to 11:00. o'clock.

REPORT VIENT
FIGHTING AROUND
VERDNFORTRESS
LULL OF INFANTRY FIGHTING IN-
DICATES REDISTRIBUTION OF
FORCES ON BOTH SIDES
FRENCH RECAPTURE TRENCH
Allies Plan First Strike for Peace
by Alining to Elhniinate
Bulgarians
London, May 26.-Violent artillery
fighting, preparing the way for a re-
newal of the- pitched battle between
the two-great armies around Verdun,
was reported in despatches from Paris
and Berlin this afternoon. The lull in
infantry fighting since early yester-
day, coupled with heavy cannonading,
is believed to indicate a redistribution
of forces on both sides for another
bloody struggle.
The combat around Verdun last
night, although of great violence, drew
comparatively small forces into ac-
tion, despatches from the German and
other war offices indicate. East of
the Meuse the French recaptured a
trench lost yesterday, Paris reported.
Berlin claims further progress in the
Douaumont region,
Rome, May 26.-A terrific smash
within a few weeks aimed ar elimin-
ating the Bulgars from the war will
be the Allies' first great strike for'
peace. This is the report in general
circulation here today. Heavy allied
blows from Saloniki and Mesopotamia
will be followed by a tremendous of-
fensive against the Austro-Germans in
an attempt to end the war before win-
ter. French, English, Serbian and
Italian forces are reported concentrat-
ing at Saloniki awaiting the word to
strike against the Bulgars and Ger-
mans in southern Serbia.
SPECIAL FIELD FOR TEACHERS
Tennessee and North Carolina Offer
Opportunities for Pedagogues
A special field of educational work
among the mountaineers of Tennes-.
see and North Carolina has been open-
ed up through the efforts of the Ameri-
can Missionary association, according
to announcement made by the appoint-
ment committee. Specially equipped
teachers who are willing to go among
the "Highlanders", as they are called,
and train them in the rudiments of
learning are at present in big demand.
While these mountaineers on the
whole are exceedingly backward, they
are naturally quick-witted and eager
to learn, and substantial salaries are
offered to all acceptable applicants.
Anyone who desires specific inform-
ation is requested to get in touch with
Miss Margaret Cameron, secretary of
the appointment committee.
STUTZ 'AR TURNS TURTLE;
ESCAPE SERIOUS INJURY
While returning from Ypsilanti last
night, the Stutz car driven by Richard
E. Gordon'18, M, accompanied by his

mother and two sistei's and S. G.
Pickus, '18, turned turtle just about
three miles from the city limits. The
big car left the road and mounted the
embankment along the D. U. R. track,
where it struck a semaphore and was
thrown back to the road, turning over
completely. The occupants were
thrown from the car and sustained
minor injuries. They were taken to
the St. Joseph hospital in Ann Arbor.

Schools, Nevspapers and Pulpit Can
Advance Public Health Mtovement
There is a miscellaneous. group oft as much for public health as any other

Weather forecast for Ann
vicinity-Cloudy.

Arbor aniI

professions, usually more closely asso-
ciated with the Lit College and the ac-
quirement of the A. B. degree, that also
have a close connection- with the public
health movement. There are such pro-
:ssions as that of the teacher, news-
;pper man, and the preacher.
What can the teacher do to advance
the public health movement? More
than almost anyone else. In the an-
ti-tuberculosis campaign, the teachers
are giving invaluable aid. They have
it practically in their power to make
or mar the health of the next genera-
tion. If every student could be im-
pressed with the fact that the public
health movement is a big constructive
movement in which he has a personal
stake, and which he can personally
help along, the next generation would
see the transfer made from mere
patching up of physical ills to a sys-
tem of public health service that would
prevent disease rather than cure it.
The service that the newspaper man
can render is hardly less important.
The newspapers of Michigan are doing

profession, with the possible excep-
tion of the medical. They are spread-
ing the gospel of right living. They
are making people familiar with the
principle that in public health it is
much better to prevent disease than
to cure it. The public health propa-
ganda is not solely a medical move-
ment; it is a great sociological move-
ment that the broad-minded newspa-
per man cannot ignore.
The minister too may go through life
without knowing there is such a move-
ment or he may become an active
force in advancing it. For the limited
number of his congregation his words
have a force and an authority that are
enjoyed by the words of few other men,
and the minister who has caught the
vision of a healthier race of man can
be of untold service. Moreover, he
can tack this work on to his own work
of advancing spiritual forces. It is
recognized today that the physical and
the spiritual are closely connected,
and by preaching the sound body the
minister is at the same time preach-
ing the healthy spirit.

TODAY
10:00 o'clock-Interclass track meet,
Ferry field.
3:00 o'clock-All Fresh vs. Ypsilanti
Normal college baseball game. Ferry
field.
4:30 o'clock-State Normal club
meets at bandstand for picnic.
7:30 o'clock-Soph engineers meet
for Pow-Wow, M. C. station.
'+:30 o'clock-Union dance, Barbour

gym.
9:00 o'clock--University
Packard academy.
TOMORROW

dance,

Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division Streets
Roy W. Hamilton
Will Preach
SUNDAY MORNING, 10:30 A. M.
University Bible Classes at Noon
Christian Endeavor Society at 6:30

10:30 o'clock-Rev. J. M. Wells
speaks at First Baptist church on
"Face to Face, or a First Hand Re-
ligion."
U-NOTICES
-All Freshmen desiring to try out
for position of assistant student mana-
ger of the Varsity band should report
in room 328 New Science building be-
tween 1:15 and* 2:00 o'clock.
Senior engineers can get invita-
tions outside engineering society
rooms from 9:00 to 11:00 o'clock this
morning. Last chance to get them.

I U

That Syncopated Musical Fest

Hill
Auditorium

The

Trip

Concert

Next

I

Thursday
June 1

A Snappy Program

Hill Auditorium

Thursday, June 1

U

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan